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  • topical
  • The FDA granted marketing approval for the orphan drug Valchlor (mechlorethamine) gel on August 23, 2013 for the topical treatment of stage IA and IB mycosis fungoides-type cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) in patients who have received prior skin-directed therapy. (drugbank.ca)
  • intravenous
  • Mechlorethamine may be administered into a vein (intravenous), into the abdomen (intraperitoneal), into the lining surrounding the heart (intrapericardial), into the lining surrounding the lungs (intrapleural), or directly onto cancer on the skin and the dose depends on several factors, including the condition being treated, the size of the patient, the particular regimen being used and the overall health of the patient. (unm.edu)
  • Intravenous (IV) mechlorethamine should be used cautiously in patients receiving other myelosuppressive therapy (e.g., radiation therapy). (pdr.net)
  • MOPP
  • It contains less procarbazine than MOPP (procarbazine is given only for 10 days in cycle instead of 14), and the very toxic mechlorethamine, which is prone to give severe neutropenia and to severely heighten the risk of secondary malignancies, is changed to less toxic cyclophosphamide, which is more safe to the progenitor stem cells (thus, less neutropenia) and less prone to give late secondary malignancies. (wikipedia.org)
  • toxic properties
  • Review and diligently follow special handling procedures before and during mechlorethamine handling because of the toxic properties of the drug such as corrosivity, carcinogenicity, mutagenicity, and teratogenicity. (pdr.net)
  • Due to the toxic properties of mechlorethamine (e.g., corrosivity, carcinogenicity, mutagenicity, teratogenicity), special handling procedures should be reviewed prior to handling and followed diligently. (rxdrugsinfo.com)
  • sodium
  • To clean gloves, tubing, surfaces, etc., after contact with mechlorethamine, soak in aqueous solution containing equal parts sodium thiosulfate 5% and sodium bicarbonate 5% for 45 minutes. (pdr.net)
  • Accidental skin contact with parenteral mechlorethamine should be treated with thorough rinsing of the area with water for at least 15 minutes, while removing contaminated clothing and shoes, followed by rinsing with 2% sodium thiosulfate solution. (pdr.net)
  • drug
  • In water or body fluids, mechlorethamine undergoes rapid chemical transformation and combines with water or reactive compounds of cells, so that the drug is no longer present in active form a few minutes after administration. (rxdrugsinfo.com)
  • Mannomustine was, at the time of its creation as a drug, claimed to be considerably less toxic than mechlorethamine. (wikipedia.org)
  • occur
  • Some side effects of mechlorethamine may occur that usually do not need medical attention. (drugs.com)
  • Immunosuppression has been reported with IV mechlorethamine therapy and bacterial, fungal, or viral infection (e.g., varicella, herpes infection) may occur. (pdr.net)
  • inflammation
  • Extravasation resulting in severe tissue damage (e.g., inflammation, induration, or sloughing of tissue) has been reported with mechlorethamine therapy. (pdr.net)