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  • diabetes
  • Obesity puts people at increased risk for chronic diseases such as heart disease, type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, stroke and some forms of cancer. (wowindia.info)
  • It seems that along with increased risk for health problems such as type 2 diabetes and heart disease, obesity is bad for your brain: we have linked it to shrinkage of brain areas that are also targeted by Alzheimer's," said Pittsburgh's Raji. (psychcentral.com)
  • Demerath and her colleagues are submitting a number of NIH grant proposals this year to continue their research and expand its scope to look at methylation changes over time, race differences and genetic determinants of methylation variation related to obesity and diabetes. (umn.edu)
  • Obesity increases the likelihood of various diseases and conditions, particularly cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes, obstructive sleep apnea, certain types of cancer, osteoarthritis and depression. (wikipedia.org)
  • Excessive body weight is associated with various diseases and conditions, particularly cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus type 2, obstructive sleep apnea, certain types of cancer, osteoarthritis and asthma. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, other studies have found waist circumference, not WHR, to be a good indicator of cardiovascular risk factors, body fat distribution, and hypertension in type 2 diabetes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Having two copies of the allele called FTO increases the likelihood of both obesity and diabetes. (wikipedia.org)
  • There have been numerous studies that have attempted, with varying degrees of success, to show links between birth weight and later-life conditions, including diabetes, obesity, tobacco smoking and intelligence. (wikipedia.org)
  • This includes theorised links with obesity, diabetes and intelligence. (wikipedia.org)
  • risks
  • Although Body Mass Index does not directly measure percent of body fat, higher BMIs are usually associated with an increase in body fat and the potential health risks of excess weight. (cyberparent.com)
  • That said, the federal government announced guidelines which create a new definition of unhealthy weight: Those individuals with a BMI range of 25 or more with a waist size of over 40 inches for men and 35 inches for women, are considered to be at high risk for health problems-generally, the higher the BMI and the larger the waist measurement, the greater the health risks. (cyberparent.com)
  • Research shows that people with "apple-shaped" bodies (with more weight around the waist) face more health risks than those with "pear-shaped" bodies who carry more weight around the hips. (wikipedia.org)
  • Normal weight obesity is a condition of having normal body weight, but high body fat percentages with the same health risks of obesity. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the late 1980s and early 1990s insightful and powerful imaging techniques were discovered that would further help advance the understanding of the health risks associated with body fat accumulation. (wikipedia.org)
  • populations
  • The Body Mass Index, a scale scientists use to determine whether someone is overweight, is not the most accurate tool to determine whether one needs to lose some pounds, but it's a useful measurement when studying global populations, experts say. (huffingtonpost.ca)
  • However, BMI does not account for the wide variation in body fat distribution, and may not correspond to the same degree of fatness or associated health risk in different individuals and populations. (wikipedia.org)
  • BMI was designed to be used as a simple means of classifying average sedentary (physically inactive) populations, with an average body composition. (wikipedia.org)
  • Carl Lavie has written that, "The B.M.I. tables are excellent for identifying obesity and body fat in large populations, but they are far less reliable for determining fatness in individuals. (wikipedia.org)
  • behavioral factors
  • The team's goal of this research and other epigenetic research is to get a more exact understanding of how the behavioral factors including obesity, exercise, and cigarette smoking, as well as environmental exposures such as air pollution and dietary factors can change the DNA over our lifetime, and lead to disease. (umn.edu)
  • risk
  • Preventing additional weight gain is recommended if you have a BMI between 25 and 27 unless you have other risk factor for obesity related diseases. (wowindia.info)
  • Obesity is a condition where there is excess accumulation of body fat which poses a risk to the health of the individual. (medindia.net)
  • Some parents and experts are concerned that so much talk of BMI - and students do compare, say nurses - may distort a child's body image, especially among older girls at risk for anorexia and bulimia. (philly.com)
  • Groups such as the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, which last week announced plans to spend $500 million on programs to give children more exercise opportunities and affordable, healthy food, hope to reduce the number of kids whose obesity puts them at risk for adult diseases. (philly.com)
  • It is defined by body mass index (BMI) and further evaluated in terms of fat distribution via the waist-hip ratio and total cardiovascular risk factors. (wikipedia.org)
  • The greatest risk factor for child obesity is the obesity of both parents. (wikipedia.org)
  • Recent validation has concluded that total and regional body volume estimates correlate positively and significantly with biomarkers of cardiovascular risk and BVI calculations correlate significantly with all biomarkers of cardio-vascular risk. (wikipedia.org)
  • A baby born small or large for gestational age (either of the two extremes) is thought to have an increased risk of obesity in later life, but it was also shown that this relationship is fully explained by maternal weight. (wikipedia.org)
  • excessive
  • It specifically refers to an excessive amount of body fat. (wowindia.info)
  • overweight" refers to an excessive amount of body weight that includes muscle, bone ,fat and water. (wowindia.info)
  • Obesity is most commonly caused by a combination of excessive food intake, lack of physical activity, and genetic susceptibility. (wikipedia.org)
  • Obesity is defined as the excessive accumulation of fat and is predominately caused when there is an energy imbalance between calorie consumption and calorie expenditure. (wikipedia.org)
  • Most people with obesity hypoventilation syndrome have concurrent obstructive sleep apnea, a condition characterized by snoring, brief episodes of apnea (cessation of breathing) during the night, interrupted sleep and excessive daytime sleepiness. (wikipedia.org)
  • insulin resistance
  • Increased adiposity (obesity) raises serum resistin levels, which in turn directly correlate to insulin resistance. (wikipedia.org)
  • There is debate regarding whether obesity or insulin resistance is the cause of the metabolic syndrome or if they are consequences of a more far-reaching metabolic derangement. (wikipedia.org)
  • The vast majority of anovulation patients belong to the WHO2 group and demonstrate very heterogeneous symptoms ranging from anovulation, obesity, biochemical or clinical hyperandrogenism and insulin resistance. (wikipedia.org)
  • nonalcoholic fatty l
  • Associated conditions include hyperuricemia, fatty liver (especially in concurrent obesity) progressing to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, polycystic ovarian syndrome (in women), erectile dysfunction (in men), and acanthosis nigricans. (wikipedia.org)
  • apnea
  • Similarly, regarding the subject of Body Mass Index, a measurement which expresses the ratio of fat to muscle in an individual, FMCSA medical programs director Mary Gunnels said BMI would not be a factor by itself in any testing mandate for conditions associated with obesity, such as sleep apnea. (overdriveonline.com)
  • this is confirmed by the occurrence of 5 or more episodes of apnea, hypopnea or respiratory-related arousals per hour (high apnea-hypopnea index) during sleep. (wikipedia.org)
  • this requires a rise of CO2 levels by 10 mmHg (1.3 kPa) after sleep compared to awake measurements and overnight drops in oxygen levels without simultaneous apnea or hypopnea. (wikipedia.org)
  • weight
  • Both studies relied on the use of the Body Mass Index scale, which is simply a ratio of one's weight in kilograms divided by their height in metres squared. (huffingtonpost.ca)
  • In part, the scale is used as a global indicator of obesity because it's much easier to gather mass data on height and weight than other factors. (huffingtonpost.ca)
  • Millar agreed that body fat, rather than weight, is a much better measure of someone's overall health, and that electronic devices and not the BMI are better suited to examine that. (huffingtonpost.ca)
  • An ideal body weight is something that varies from individual to individual, and depends on body type, stage in the lifecycle and assorted genetic factors. (blogs.com)
  • Persons with a body mass index of 30 kg per m 2 or greater or 27 kg per m 2 or greater with comorbidities who do not succeed in losing weight with diet and activity modifications may consider medication to assist with weight loss. (aafp.org)
  • Body mass index (BMI) is measure of body fat based on height and weight that applies to both adult men and women. (ifso.com)
  • The BMI is a tool used to assess overweight and obesity and monitor changes in body weight. (wowindia.info)
  • The method of treatment depends on you level of obesity, overall health condition, and readiness to lose weight. (wowindia.info)
  • Depending upon persons circumstances a reasonable target goal may be a weight loss of 10% of body weight over six months. (wowindia.info)
  • A variety of formulas are available to determine your ideal body weight, but keep in mind they don't factor in your activity level, muscle mass and frame size. (livestrong.com)
  • Ideal body weight is based on your height and gender. (livestrong.com)
  • Using this equation, a 5-foot, 7-inch female would have an ideal body weight of 135 pounds, plus or minus 13 pounds. (livestrong.com)
  • A 6-foot, 3-inch male should have an ideal body weight of 196 pounds, plus or minus 20 pounds. (livestrong.com)
  • To define the weight categories, they used the Body Mass Index (BMI), the most widely used measurement for obesity. (psychcentral.com)
  • Concern about the affect of children's weight on health has led at least a half-dozen states, including Pennsylvania, to require in-school BMI calculations, and to alert parents with 'obesity report cards. (philly.com)
  • BMI is a calculation that uses your height and weight to estimate how much body fat you have. (kidshealth.org)
  • Fad diets and other weight-loss methods can be hard to stick to, may not provide the nutrients your body needs, can have unwanted or dangerous side effects, and are usually not effective in the long run. (kidshealth.org)
  • Your Body Mass Index (BMI) is basically the relationship between your height and weight. (cyberparent.com)
  • People with small frames may be considered a healthy weight when they actually have an unhealthy level of body fat. (cyberparent.com)
  • The system can be used to calculate a persons Body Mass Index (BMI) by dividing their weight (in kilograms) by the square of their height (in meters). (wikipedia.org)
  • For both measurements, the individual should stand with feet close together, arms at the side and body weight evenly distributed, and should wear little clothing. (wikipedia.org)
  • The body fat percentage is considered to be an even more accurate measure of relative weight. (wikipedia.org)
  • Relative weight and body mass index (BMI) are nearly identical and are reasonable estimates of body fatness as measured by percentage body fat. (wikipedia.org)
  • Whether children's school lunches are based on the new nutrition guidelines suggested by the initiative, or children use equipment donated to schools to promote exercise, it is nearly impossible for children not to be affected by Let's Move Body mass index (or BMI) is a measurement of weight in relation to height that can help to determine weight status. (wikipedia.org)
  • The body mass index (BMI) or Quetelet index is a value derived from the mass (weight) and height of an individual. (wikipedia.org)
  • The modern term "body mass index" (BMI) for the ratio of human body weight to squared height was coined in a paper published in the July 1972 edition of the Journal of Chronic Diseases by Ancel Keys and others. (wikipedia.org)
  • if not fully satisfactory, at least as good as any other relative weight index as an indicator of relative obesity" The interest in an index that measures body fat came with increasing obesity in prosperous Western societies. (wikipedia.org)
  • B M I = mass kg height m 2 = mass lb height in 2 × 703 {\displaystyle \mathrm {BMI} ={\frac {{\text{mass}}_{\text{kg}}}{{\text{height}}_{\text{m}}^{2}}}={\frac {{\text{mass}}_{\text{lb}}}{{\text{height}}_{\text{in}}^{2}}}\times 703} BMI provides a simple numeric measure of a person's thickness or thinness, allowing health professionals to discuss weight problems more objectively with their patients. (wikipedia.org)
  • A frequent use of the BMI is to assess how much an individual's body weight departs from what is normal or desirable for a person's height. (wikipedia.org)
  • Over 200 genes affect weight by determining activity level, food preferences, body type, and metabolism. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, despite the importance of obesity, patients who are of normal weight may also be insulin-resistant and have the syndrome. (wikipedia.org)
  • The body fat percentage is a measure of fitness level, since it is the only body measurement which directly calculates a person's relative body composition without regard to height or weight. (wikipedia.org)
  • Most modern body composition laboratories today use the value of 1.1 kilograms per litre for the density of the "fat free mass", a theoretical tissue composed of 72% water (density = 0.993), 21% protein (density = 1.340) and 7% mineral (density = 3.000) by weight. (wikipedia.org)
  • With a well engineered weighing system, body density can be determined with great accuracy by completely submerging a person in water and calculating the volume of the displaced water from the weight of the displaced water. (wikipedia.org)
  • If there were no errors whatsoever in measuring body density, the uncertainty in fat estimation would be about ± 3.8% of the body weight, primarily because of normal variability in body constituents. (wikipedia.org)
  • Birth weight is the body weight of a baby at its birth. (wikipedia.org)
  • child's
  • The early physical effects of obesity in adolescence include, almost all of the child's organs being affected, gallstones, hepatitis, sleep apnoea and increased intracranial pressure. (wikipedia.org)
  • Other reasons may also be due to psychological factors and the child's body type. (wikipedia.org)
  • depression
  • Many people think that individual with obesity are gluttonous, lazy or both feeling of rejection, shame or depression may occur. (wowindia.info)
  • Researchers
  • When comparing their results for over 2,000 African American individuals with 3,000 white individuals in other studies, researchers were interested to learn signatures of obesity were largely similar across race/ethnic groups. (umn.edu)
  • Hence
  • Hence, people with obesity need to expend more energy to breathe effectively. (wikipedia.org)
  • This results in a lower rate of heat removal from the body, hence the sensation of being overheated. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hence, the heat index could seem unrealistically low, unless resting inactive (idle) in heavily shaded areas. (wikipedia.org)
  • metric
  • The BMI may also be determined using a table or chart which displays BMI as a function of mass and height using contour lines or colours for different BMI categories, and which may use other units of measurement (converted to metric units for the calculation). (wikipedia.org)
  • Adolescents
  • Adolescents 'are more aware of body image,' McLaughlin said. (philly.com)
  • Other issues that may affect the results surrounding this method for children and adolescents includes their age, sex, ethnicity muscle and bone mass, their height as well as their sexual maturation levels. (wikipedia.org)
  • people
  • Therefore, body builders and people who have a lot of muscle bulk will have a high BMI but are not overweight. (ifso.com)
  • People with stockier builds may be considered overweight without having a lot of body fat. (cyberparent.com)
  • Obesity hypoventilation syndrome (also known as Pickwickian syndrome) is a condition in which severely overweight people fail to breathe rapidly enough or deeply enough, resulting in low blood oxygen levels and high blood carbon dioxide (CO2) levels. (wikipedia.org)
  • This results in taller people having a reported BMI that is uncharacteristically high, compared to their actual body fat levels. (wikipedia.org)
  • normal people, who don't have so great a muscular mass, should stay into the fitness range in the table to be healthier. (wikipedia.org)
  • Because the humidity index is based on temperatures in the shade, while people often move across sunny areas, then the heat index can give a much lower temperature than actual conditions of typical outdoor activities. (wikipedia.org)
  • Also, for people exercising or active, at the time, then the heat index could give a temperature lower than the felt conditions. (wikipedia.org)
  • syndrome
  • Obesity hypoventilation syndrome is defined as the combination of obesity (body mass index above 30 kg/m2), hypoxemia (falling oxygen levels in blood) during sleep, and hypercapnia (increased blood carbon dioxide levels) during the day, resulting from hypoventilation (excessively slow or shallow breathing). (wikipedia.org)
  • Obesity hypoventilation syndrome is a form of sleep disordered breathing. (wikipedia.org)
  • apple-shaped
  • This body type is also known as "apple shaped", as opposed to "pear shaped", in which fat is deposited on the hips and buttocks. (wikipedia.org)
  • condition
  • For Australians aged between 4 and 17 years, obesity is a very concerning condition as once gained it is favourably harder to be liberated from. (wikipedia.org)