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  • rubella
  • Haemophilus influenzae type b {Hib} conjugate {1,2} and hepatitis B {2,3} vaccines) and recommendations for a second dose of measles-mumps-rubella vaccine (MMR) (4,5) and the use of acellular pertussis vaccines (2,6). (cdc.gov)
  • childhood
  • For approximately 30 years, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) and the Committee on Infectious Diseases (COID) of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) -- the two groups responsible for developing vaccine recommendations for the public and private sectors -- worked to develop similar schedules for routine childhood vaccination. (cdc.gov)
  • vaccines
  • Practitioners should consult the Report of the Committee on Infectious Diseases (Red Book) (2), the vaccine-specific recommendations of ACIP, and the official manufacturers' package inserts or the Physician's Desk Reference (PDR) (7) for detailed information and specific recommendations for administration of vaccines. (cdc.gov)
  • towards measles
  • The LCA showed three classes of parents with different attitudes and believes towards measles vaccination: The biggest group (class 1) are those having positive attitudes towards immunisation, followed by the second biggest group (class 2) which is characterised by having fearful attitudes and by showing uncertainty about immunisation. (biomedcentral.com)
  • immunity
  • As families increasingly and purposefully restricted their sizes, mothers were better able to conserve vitamin A, iron, and other precious nutritional resources that they must supply to their unborn children and nursing infants in order to provide them with robust immunity to infectious diseases. (westonaprice.org)
  • Screening to detect HCW who lack presumptive evidence of immunity and vaccination with two doses of vaccine should be reinforced, especially in young workers, to minimize the risk of contracting measles and infecting the susceptible patients they care for. (biomedcentral.com)
  • mortality
  • Did Cod Liver Oil Contribute to the Historical Decline in Measles Mortality and Mortality From Other Infectious Diseases? (westonaprice.org)
  • It therefore seems timely to fulfill my now more than two-year-old promise to write a blog on the possibility and evidence that cod liver oil may have contributed to the historical decline in mortality from measles and other infectious diseases. (westonaprice.org)
  • I made that promise in a blog post about the contribution of family planning to the historical decline in infectious disease mortality . (westonaprice.org)
  • Conventionally, public health historians attribute the decline in infectious disease incidence and mortality to interventions that helped stop the spread of microorganisms, such as sanitation, hygiene, identification of infected individuals so they could be treated and the risk of transmission could be minimized, as well as specific vaccinations and medical treatments. (westonaprice.org)
  • They also argued, however, that declines in mortality from measles and other infectious diseases were part of a later trend that primarily affected infants and young children and did not begin until the 1890s. (westonaprice.org)
  • In order to explain how the decline in infectious disease mortality resulted in a population boom, one has to explain how mortality could be reduced more than family size had decreased so that there would be a net increase in surviving offspring. (westonaprice.org)
  • While McKeown, and Ostry and Frank after him, were concerned with how the decline in infectious disease mortality contributed to the population boom, my argument above is interesting to me not so much because I want to explain the population boom, but because it implies that there is still more to be explained about how infectious disease mortality was virtually eradicated. (westonaprice.org)
  • We find that nonmeasles infectious disease mortality in high-income countries is tightly coupled to measles incidence at this lag, in both the pre- and post-vaccine eras. (princeton.edu)
  • Despite huge efforts to promote widespread vaccination, measles remains an important cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, especially in African children. (springer.com)
  • susceptible
  • This vulnerability was previously thought to last a month or two, however, a new study shows that children may in fact live in the immunological shadow of measles for up to three years, leaving them highly susceptible to a host of other deadly diseases. (princeton.edu)
  • Although vaccine coverage among children improved, convincing susceptible young adults to get vaccinated remains a critical issue if the target to eliminate the disease by 2015 is to be met. (cdc.gov)
  • 3. Susceptible organism - no immunized people, older than 6 month, which never had measles. (blogspot.com)
  • When measles coughs and sneezes, the virus with droplets through the mouth, pharynx, conjunctival into susceptible disease. (scleritis.net)
  • Epidemiology
  • Global measles activity was associated with measles epidemiology in Quebec. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Differences in measles epidemiology between Ontario and Quebec from 2007-2011 are not explained by greater exposure in Quebec. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Measles epidemiology during elimination is therefore influenced by global measles activity and travel. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Our objective was to assess the contribution of travel patterns to the difference in measles epidemiology between the two provinces through a descriptive analysis and by exploring a new measure, the measles exposure index. (biomedcentral.com)
  • We did this by comparing international travel and measles activity among the source countries of travelers arriving via commercial flights to Ontario and Quebec, to the measles epidemiology of each respective province over the period of 2007 to 2011. (biomedcentral.com)
  • coughs
  • Measles can be easily spread through the air when someone coughs or sneezes or when they come in contact with mucus or saliva from an infected person. (abc11.com)
  • Infected droplets spray into the air where other people can inhale them when someone with measles talks, sneezes or coughs. (epharmapedia.com)
  • transmission
  • Parameter estimation for infectious disease models is important for basic understanding (e.g. to identify major transmission pathways), for forecasting emerging epidemics, and for designing control measures. (royalsocietypublishing.org)
  • The multiple modes of transmission help explain the severe communicability of measles. (mhealth.org)
  • In this podcast we round up the top news stories of the week, including an in-depth look at the measles vaccine and sexual transmission in Zika. (id-hub.com)
  • ELISA
  • In this algorithm, samples that are negative or doubtful by ELISA for measles (presence of immunoglobulin M) are tested in another ELISA for detection of rubella-specific IgM. (springer.com)