Loading...
  • vaccine
  • Seventeen (39%) were infected while visiting a health-care facility, including a child aged 12 months who was exposed in a physician's office when receiving a routine dose of measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine. (cdc.gov)
  • importations
  • Because these cases resulted from importations and occurred almost exclusively in unvaccinated persons, the findings underscore the ongoing risk for measles among unvaccinated persons and the importance of maintaining high levels of vaccination. (cdc.gov)
  • cases
  • The number of reported measles cases has declined from 763,094 in 1958 to fewer than 150 cases reported per year since 1997 ( 1 ). (cdc.gov)
  • However, during January 1--April 25, 2008, a total of 64 confirmed measles cases were preliminarily reported to CDC, the most reported by this date for any year since 2001. (cdc.gov)
  • Of the 64 cases, 54 were associated with importation of measles from other countries into the United States, and 63 of the 64 patients were unvaccinated or had unknown or undocumented vaccination status. (cdc.gov)
  • Cases are considered importation associated if they are 1) acquired outside the United States (i.e., international importation) or 2) acquired inside the United States and either epidemiologically linked via a chain of transmission to an importation or accompanied by virologic evidence of importation (i.e., a chain of transmission from which a measles virus is identified that is not endemic in the United States). (cdc.gov)
  • Fifty-six of the 64 measles cases reported in 2008 have occurred in five outbreaks (defined as three or more cases linked in time or place). (cdc.gov)
  • endemic measles
  • This report describes the epidemiology of measles in the United States in 2004, documenting the absence of endemic measles and the continued risk for internationally imported measles cases that can result in indigenous transmission. (cdc.gov)
  • conjunctivitis
  • A measles case is considered confirmed if it is laboratory-confirmed or meets the clinical case definition (an illness characterized by a generalized rash lasting ≥3 days, a temperature of ≥101°F [≥38.3°C], and cough, coryza, or conjunctivitis) and is linked epidemiologically to a confirmed case. (cdc.gov)
  • This graphic reminds clinicians to consider measles and ask about recent travel if patients have a febrile rash and cough, coryza, and conjunctivitis. (cdc.gov)
  • serologically confirmed
  • In the first case, the mother, age 44, returned to Indiana from the orphanage and developed a measles rash that was serologically confirmed. (in.gov)
  • In another case involving the same orphanage, the mother returned to Indiana and her baby, age 10 months, developed a rash illness, which was serologically confirmed as measles. (in.gov)
  • Both cases were serologically confirmed as measles. (in.gov)
  • exposure
  • One case of transmission after exposure on an aircraft flight was documented in a passenger who had been vaccinated with 2 doses of measles-containing vaccine and who was seated next to a person with infectious disease. (cdc.gov)
  • Ten (27%) of the cases were indigenous, of which six (60%) were import-linked and four (40%) had unknown sources of exposure (two occurring in a two-case chain of transmission and two sporadic cases with no epidemiologic link to any other measles case). (cdc.gov)
  • Cases are considered importations if exposure to measles virus occurred outside the United States 7-21 days before rash onset and rash occurred within 21 days of entry into the United States, with no known exposure to measles in the United States during that time. (cdc.gov)
  • Alberta Health Services is warning the public about possible exposure to an individual with lab-confirmed measles at the Sturgeon Community Hospital emergency department on May 31, June 1 and June 3. (thestar.com)
  • If a worker or workers could be exposed to measles, the employer must develop and implement an exposure control plan (ECP). (worksafebc.com)
  • virus
  • Know what to look for in patients that may have measles, when to recommend MMR vaccine, and other details about the virus. (cdc.gov)
  • These droplets can carry the measles virus. (kidshealth.org)
  • The measles virus can live on surfaces for 2 hours. (kidshealth.org)
  • The measles virus has also been associated with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE), which causes chronic brain disease in children and adolescents. (infoplease.com)
  • Measles is a disease caused by a virus that spreads very easily from person to person. (mass.gov)
  • The virus that causes measles lives in the nose and throat and is sprayed into the air when an infected person sneezes, coughs or talks. (mass.gov)
  • Touching tissues or sharing a cup used by someone who has measles can also spread the virus. (mass.gov)
  • In 1954 the virus that causes measles was isolated in Boston, Massachusetts, by John F. Enders and Thomas C. Peebles. (news-medical.net)
  • Measles spreads when an infected person coughs or sneezes the virus into the air and someone inhales or touches it. (nationwidechildrens.org)
  • Of the 37 cases, 34 (92%) were confirmed by laboratory testing (i.e., detection of measles-specific IgM antibodies or measles virus) and the remaining three (8%) were confirmed by meeting the clinical case definition ( 2 ) and by being epidemiologically linked to a laboratory-confirmed case. (cdc.gov)
  • Three genotypes of measles virus were identified among viral samples collected from nine patients. (cdc.gov)
  • Measles virus was isolated from eight chains of transmission linked to an imported measles case (including three chains of one case). (cdc.gov)
  • Laboratory confirmation of measles is made by detection in serum of measles-specific immunoglobulin M (IgM), a significant rise in measles immunoglobulin G (IgG) level, isolation of measles virus, or detection of measles virus by nucleic acid amplification from a clinical specimen. (cdc.gov)
  • The measles virus is spread through coughing and sneezing. (kingcounty.gov)
  • Measles is caused by a virus and spreads very easily when an infected person breathes, coughs, or sneezes. (kingcounty.gov)
  • Caused by a virus, measles is easily spread. (worksafebc.com)
  • Anyone with measles who breathes, coughs, sneezes, or talks releases virus into the air. (worksafebc.com)
  • doses
  • Children in child care and preschool need 1 dose of MMR and childcare workers also need to have 1 or 2 doses of measles containing vaccine, depending on their age and other factors. (mass.gov)
  • vaccinations
  • Those whose measles vaccinations aren't up to date should be getting their shots six weeks before travelling because the disease continues to circulate in many parts of the world, said Dr. Theresa Tam. (thestar.com)
  • children
  • Children are dying because of measles, they are one of the primary killers of children in developing countries. (google.com)
  • The number of people in Africa that have measles is very high, mostly being children. (google.com)
  • Two thousand an estimated 600 African children died from measles each day. (google.com)
  • Measles in history was considered to be a life event that almost all children went through. (news-medical.net)
  • Children infected with measles should not attend school or childcare for at least five days after the start of the rash. (nationwidechildrens.org)
  • These challenges need to be met to ensure that future generations of children do not die of measles. (nih.gov)
  • This infographic highlights CDC's routine measles vaccine recommendations for children, including special vaccine recommendations for children traveling abroad. (cdc.gov)
  • Serious health problems from measles are more common among children younger than five and adults older than 20. (kingcounty.gov)
  • What you may not know is that Stewart and his producers edited out part of the original CNN clip - the part where CNN reported that Skytt's children have, in fact, been vaccinated against measles. (gawker.com)
  • 1991
  • Despite the concerns, Bullock-DuCasse noted that Jamaica has been free of endemic or local transmission of measles since 1991 and said this is because of the country's expanded immunisation programme. (jamaica-gleaner.com)
  • diseases
  • Deafness, blindness, seizure disorders and other brain diseases with measles are less common. (mass.gov)
  • Because measles can look like other diseases that cause a rash, the only sure way to know if you have measles is to get a blood test. (mass.gov)
  • Diagnosis
  • CDC urges organizations and associations that reach healthcare professionals to place the web button or banner on your website to connect healthcare professionals to CDC's guidelines for patient evaluation, diagnosis & management of measles. (cdc.gov)
  • shorten
  • Since there's no medicine to make measles go away or shorten how long you have it, you'll just have to wait for it to heal on its own. (kidshealth.org)
  • deafness
  • Do you know that even though a child can survive measles they may suffer blindness, deafness, or brain damage? (google.com)
  • pneumonia
  • Measles often causes diarrhea, ear infections and pneumonia. (mass.gov)
  • Among the 70 (32%) measles patients who were hospitalized, 17 (24%) had diarrhea, 15 (21%) were dehydrated, and 12 (17%) had pneumonia. (cdc.gov)