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  • jaws
  • pair of chewing jaws (mandibles), a pair of complex first maxillae, and a pair of similar second maxillae joined together behind the mouth to form a structure called the labium. (britannica.com)
  • Mandibles ('jaws') are a crucial tool for many insects, but perhaps in no insect group are they more highly utilized than in the ants (Formicidae). (tolweb.org)
  • examination
  • We report a rare case of unicystic ameloblastoma (UA) of mandible which showed multilocular radiolucency on the left side of mandible on radiographic examination which is very unusual, and the majority of the cases of UAs till date has been reported of unilocular radiolucency. (hindawi.com)
  • sides
  • As the body of the mandible extends anteriorly from the rami on both sides, it forms an arch with the chin at its peak. (innerbody.com)
  • Mass foraging predators (e.g. army ants, described below) use their mandibles to pin down prey from all sides while their nestmates dispatch it. (tolweb.org)
  • In dorsal and cranial direction, you can see the mylohyoid line of the mandible ascending on both sides, imitating the course of the Linea obliqua on the external side. (doccheck.com)
  • inferior
  • From the necks, the mandible widens considerably as it descends obliquely in the inferior and anterior directions to form the rami of the mandible. (innerbody.com)
  • At its inferior end, the rami turn almost ninety degrees anteriorly to form the body of the mandible. (innerbody.com)
  • The platysma muscles, which depress the jaw, form insertions along the inferior edges of the body of the mandible. (innerbody.com)
  • Several other muscles form their origins on the mandible, such as the buccinators muscles, which arise inferior to the alveoli, and the mentalis muscles, which arise from the mental protuberance. (innerbody.com)
  • lower lip
  • The basic mouthparts of insects include (from anterior to posterior) the labrum (upper lip), paired mandibles, paired maxillae, and the labium (lower lip) (Chapman, 1998). (tolweb.org)
  • Tools
  • Mandibles can be wielded as formidable weapons in their own right, or as tools with which to grasp prey until a paralyzing sting can be delivered (a common strategy in the Ponerinae , most of which are solitary predators). (tolweb.org)
  • insects
  • Like most insects, ants lack grasping forelegs (such as those found in the Mantodea and Mantispidae) and compensate for this by using their mandibles as 'hands. (tolweb.org)
  • Like other social insects, ants construct often elaborate nests, using their mandibles to dig into dirt or wood, and then again to carry the debris away. (tolweb.org)
  • close
  • The shape of the condyles of the mandible allows it to elevate as well as depress in order to open and close the mouth. (innerbody.com)
  • Keeping hydration close, the Mandible stays mounted to your steed adding a mere 28 grams a piece. (jensonusa.com)
  • site
  • This is the condyle of the mandible and site of an often-missed fracture. (medscape.com)
  • Another fascinating use of mandibles in some ants is social carrying, in which one worker will physically carry another worker in its mandibles to aid in recruitment to a food source or new nest site. (tolweb.org)
  • General
  • This information refers to the general prevalence and incidence of these diseases, not to how likely they are to be the actual cause of Mandible infection. (rightdiagnosis.com)
  • often
  • Carnivorous ants often use their mandibles to decapitate or dismember their prey, to facilitate feeding or storage. (tolweb.org)
  • important
  • Perhaps more important generally is the role of mandibles in defense against smaller predators and competitors, such as other ants. (tolweb.org)