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  • compounds
  • Being a strong reactant that forms stable compounds with chlorine, oxygen, and sulfur, magnesium has several metallurgical applications, such as in the production of titanium from titanium tetrachloride and in the desulfurization of blast-furnace iron. (britannica.com)
  • Its chemical reactivity is also evident in the magnesium compounds that have wide application in industry, medicine, and agriculture. (britannica.com)
  • Epsom
  • Overuse of milk of magnesia (as a laxative or antacid) or Epsom salts (as a laxative or tonic) can cause you to ingest too much magnesium, especially if you have kidney problems. (spineuniverse.com)
  • seawater
  • During World War II the Dow Chemical Company of the United States and Magnesium Elektron Limited of the United Kingdom began the electrolytic reduction of magnesium from seawater pumped from Galveston Bay , Texas, and the North Sea at Hartlepool, England. (britannica.com)
  • compound
  • In the study, published Jan. 28 in Neuron , neuroscientists from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and Tsinghua University in Beijing found that increasing brain magnesium using a newly developed compound, magnesium-L-threonate (MgT), improves learning abilities, working memory, and short- and-long-term memory in rats. (webmd.com)
  • alloys
  • However, the addition of alloying elements improves these properties to such an extent that both cast and wrought magnesium alloys are widely used, particularly where light weight and high strength are important. (britannica.com)
  • Other contributions by IG Farben were the development of numerous cast and malleable alloys, refining and protective fluxes, wrought magnesium products, and a vast number of aircraft and automobile applications. (britannica.com)
  • muscles
  • Magnesium is a mineral that helps muscles, nerves, the immune system , and the heart work as they should. (kidshealth.org)
  • Of the body s magnesium, 30-40 percent is found in muscles and soft tissues, 1 percent is found in extracellular fluid, and the remainder is in the skeleton, where it accounts for up to 1 percent of bone ash ( 4, 5 ). (fao.org)
  • Because of its benefits in relieving stiff muscles, magnesium can be especially beneficial to fibromyalgia patients. (dailystrength.org)
  • intake
  • A new study suggests that increasing your intake of magnesium , an essential mineral found in dark leafy vegetables and certain fruits, beans, and nuts, may help combat memory lapses associated with aging. (webmd.com)
  • The researchers conclude that the study provides "evidence for a possible causal relationship between high [magnesium] intake and memory enhancements in aged rats. (webmd.com)
  • They also call for further studies to investigate the relationship between dietary magnesium intake, body and brain magnesium levels, and cognitive skills. (webmd.com)
  • tissues
  • Soft tissue magnesium functions as a co-factor of many enzymes involved in energy metabolism, protein synthesis, RNA and DNA synthesis, and maintenance of the electrical potential of nervous tissues and cell membranes. (fao.org)
  • Little is known of other roles for magnesium in skeletal tissues. (fao.org)
  • The body attempts to keep blood magnesium levels relatively stable and will release magnesium from bone and tissues to accomplish this. (labcorp.com)
  • bone
  • However, the proportion of bone magnesium in this exchangeable form declines significantly with increasing age ( 9 ). (fao.org)
  • Significant increases in bone mineral density of the femur have been associated positively with rises in erythrocyte magnesium when the diets of subjects with gluten-sensitive enteropathy were fortified with magnesium ( 10 ). (fao.org)
  • widely
  • Magnesium is widely distributed in plant and animal foods, and geochemical and other environmental variables rarely have a major influence on its content in foods. (fao.org)
  • excessive
  • When someone has a kidney disorder or uncontrolled diabetes, a magnesium test may be ordered periodically, along with kidney function tests such as a BUN and creatinine , to help monitor kidney function and to make sure that the person is not excreting or retaining excessive amounts of magnesium. (labcorp.com)
  • decline
  • This study not only highlights the importance of a diet with sufficient daily magnesium, but also suggests the usefulness of magnesium-based treatments for aging-associated memory decline," one of the study's authors, Susumu Tonegawa, says in a news release. (webmd.com)
  • content
  • Corn flour, cassava and sago flour, and polished rice flour have an extremely low magnesium content. (fao.org)
  • adults
  • Table 45 presents representative data for the dietary magnesium intakes of infants and adults. (fao.org)
  • The recommended dietary allowance for magnesium for adults 19-30 years old is 400 milligrams/day for men and 310 milligrams/day for non- pregnant women. (webmd.com)
  • water
  • A magic attack that deals water damage or creates water slows a magnesium golem (as the slow spell) for 3 rounds, with no saving throw. (google.com)
  • You should take small doses of magnesium throughout the day, with a full glass of water with each dose to avoid diarrhea. (spineuniverse.com)
  • levels
  • It also might be done if someone has a medical condition that makes low magnesium levels more likely, such as a kidney problem. (kidshealth.org)
  • Magnesium levels may be checked as part of an evaluation of the severity of kidney problems and/or of uncontrolled diabetes and may help in the diagnosis of gastrointestinal disorders. (labcorp.com)
  • Magnesium blood levels tend to be decreased in the second and third trimesters of pregnancy. (labcorp.com)
  • Magnesium also aids in maintaining healthy blood pressure levels. (dailystrength.org)