• These parts of the lung become inflamed and/or scarred, which leads to problems with getting oxygen out of the air and into the bloodstream. (caring.com)
  • A pulmonologist, a doctor who specializes in diseases of the lung, will treat you and help you to manage your medications and oxygen therapy. (upmc.com)
  • The scarring associated with interstitial lung disease eventually affects your ability to breathe and get enough oxygen into your bloodstream. (mayoclinic.org)
  • This lung remodeling leads to a decrease in the ability of the lungs to take in oxygen that makes breathing more difficult. (brighamandwomens.org)
  • Your care plan may include a variety of medications, oxygen therapy, pulmonary rehabilitation and, when indicated, lung transplantation. (brighamandwomens.org)
  • Devices are available that deliver pure oxygen to your lungs. (brighamandwomens.org)
  • Provides information on both the neonatal and the acute conditions in which the lungs are unable to provide enough oxygen for the body. (dmoztools.net)
  • Some forms of interstitial lung disease lead to irreversible scarring and respiratory failure. (medicinenet.com)
  • Because these problems are vague and tend to develop gradually - often long after you have irreversible lung damage - you may attribute them to aging, to being overweight or out of shape, or to the residual effects of respiratory infection. (mcw.edu)
  • A lung infection occurring within the interstitium. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Disease of the interstitium is recognized on imaging studies as a thick lace (sponge), sometimes symmetric, and in other types, scattered and irregular. (medicinenet.com)
  • Shortness of breath affects the breathing passages and the lungs, the heart, or blood vessels. (medicinenet.com)
  • This disease affects men more than it does women and typically develops in people over age 50. (targetwoman.com)
  • A lung diseased usually linked to a person's employment and caused by breathing in too much silica dust. (medicalnewstoday.com)