Loading...
  • vitro
  • Mononuclear leukocytes in the newt limb blastema: in vitro behavior. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Since the precise interactions of the various newt limb blastema cell types (pleiomorphic, bipolar, signet and multinucleated cells) with one another are difficult to ascertain in vivo, in this study we describe the in vitro behavior and interactions of these cell types with one another. (semanticscholar.org)
  • These results establish mIGF-1 as a potent regenerative agent, increasing bone marrow and local SC pools and providing a mechanistic explanation for the dramatic effects of supplemental MLC / mIgf-1 transgene expression on muscle mass and integrity both in vitro and in vivo . (pnas.org)
  • We have found that pseudotyped Maloney Murine Leukemia Virus (MMLV) retroviruses can very efficiently infect axolotl cells in vitro and in vivo , and can be used for both lineage and functional analyses in regenerating limbs. (biologists.org)
  • We therefore sought a virus system that efficiently and stably infects salamander cells in vitro and in vivo and does not require pseudotyping and is not prone to silencing during initial and second round of regeneration. (biomedcentral.com)
  • proliferation
  • After blastema formation, a period of extensive proliferation of blastema cells follows, before the cells re-differentiate to produce all the different cell types for the tissues of the missing appendage. (biomedcentral.com)
  • In amphibians this process is regulated by nerve fibres present at the site of injury, which have been proposed to release factors into the amputated limbs/fins, promoting and sustaining the proliferation of blastemal cells. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Although the cellular mediators and immunological signaling necessary for regeneration in the salamander have not been described, recent reports suggest that inflammation may influence the initiation and completion of wound healing and regeneration ( 9 ⇓ ⇓ ⇓ ⇓ - 14 ), as the cytokine microenvironment directly influences the time course of leukocyte infiltration, cellular proliferation, angiogenesis, and collagen remodeling of damaged tissues. (pnas.org)
  • We identified stage-dependent functional roles of macrophages in mediating fin tissue outgrowth and bony ray patterning, in part through modulating levels of blastema proliferation. (biologists.org)
  • gene
  • This method opens up the possibility of marking and perturbing gene function inducibly in any definable cell populations in the axolotl, a key functionality required for the precise, rigorous understanding of processes such as regeneration. (pnas.org)
  • While the discovery of the function of gene p21 , as you will see, will allow us to regrow lost parts, scientists are also quickly learning how to rejuvenate and re-grow damaged muscle fibers. (viewzone.com)
  • The researchers inserted a gene known to be active in SMFCs into single-celled newt embryos. (qubitsnews.com)
  • The gene was linked to a red fluorescent protein which could be switched on and off at precise times with the addition of a particular chemical to the rearing solution.Selected transgenic newts had a limb removed under anesthesia. (qubitsnews.com)
  • Systemic macrophage depletion during this period resulted in wound closure but permanent failure of limb regeneration, associated with extensive fibrosis and disregulation of extracellular matrix component gene expression. (pnas.org)
  • adult newts
  • McLaughlin, H.M.G., Rathbone, M.P., Liversage R.A., and D.S. McLaughlin, 1983, Levels of cyclic GMP and of cyclic AMP in regenerating forelimbs of adult newts following denervation, J.Exp.Zool. (springer.com)
  • and it has remained unsettled whether adult newts possess a cellular population that is equal to mammalian satellite cells. (rupress.org)
  • flatworms
  • This breakthrough clears the way for humans to re-grow a missing finger, arm, leg, or virtually any cellular tissue much the same way as Newts, sponges, flatworms and some fish already do. (viewzone.com)
  • Planarians are non-parasitic Platyhelminthes (flatworms) famous for their regeneration ability and for having a well-organized brain. (biomedcentral.com)
  • In some invertebrates, such as flatworms, reserve cells scattered throughout the body supply the cells of blastemas. (britannica.com)
  • stem
  • Regenerating MLC / mIgf-1 transgenic muscles contained increased cell populations expressing stem cell markers, exhibited accelerated myogenic differentiation, expressed markers of regeneration and readily converted cocultured bone marrow to muscle. (pnas.org)
  • processes
  • Regeneration in biology, however, mainly refers to the morphogenic processes that characterize the phenotypic plasticity of traits allowing multi-cellular organisms to repair and maintain the integrity of their physiological and morphological states. (wikipedia.org)
  • Above the genetic level, regeneration is fundamentally regulated by asexual cellular processes. (wikipedia.org)
  • cell
  • Although in lethally irradiated mice, bone marrow-derived SCs replenish the depleted satellite cell pool and subsequently incorporate effectively into exercised skeletal muscle ( 9 ), less is known about the ability of bone-marrow-derived SCs to ameliorate muscle damage under more clinically relevant conditions. (pnas.org)
  • Indeed, the transplantation of bone marrow-derived SCs into the mdx dystrophic mouse model had a limited impact on muscle cell replacement ( 10 ), suggesting that the poor recruitment of circulating SCs is one of the limiting factors for tissue repair ( 10 , 11 ). (pnas.org)
  • CEH-2 protein is restricted to the nuclei of one type of small muscle cell, one type of epithelial cell, and three types of neurons in the anterior pharynx in the head. (biologists.org)
  • Furthermore, targeting specific cell types will be necessary to understand how regeneration of the diverse tissues within the limb is accomplished. (biologists.org)
  • We describe a multipotent Pax7 + satellite cell population located within the skeletal muscle of the salamander limb. (rupress.org)
  • Earlier studies identified a cell population that is closely apposed to the myofiber in the adult newt limb as well. (rupress.org)
  • regenerative capacity
  • We have previously reported that postmitotic expression of a local isoform of insulin-like growth factor 1 (mIGF-1) induces myocyte hypertrophy ( 16 ), increases mass and strength of postnatal muscle, and preserves regenerative capacity in senescent and dystrophic mice ( 17 - 19 ). (pnas.org)
  • humans
  • To some extent, humans already have the capacity for regeneration. (medgadget.com)
  • Understanding how to re-grow and rejuvenate cardiac muscle -- like the zebra fish does -- would prevent the number one cause of death for humans. (viewzone.com)
  • A possible hypothesis for the origin of human cancer is that during the course of evolution, humans lost an advanced regeneration ability as well as the associated control system, resulting in a more permissive environment for cancer development. (jcancer.org)
  • larval
  • The researchers made the exciting discovery that the mechanism for regeneration in the larval newt is different to the one used after metamorphosis. (qubitsnews.com)
  • The transgenic newt embryos were then reared until the swimming larval stage, at 3 months of age, or the metamorphosed juvenile stage, at 16 months. (qubitsnews.com)
  • transgenic
  • In nonirradiated MLC / mIgf-1 transgenic mice, muscle injury expanded the SP compartment in the bone marrow. (pnas.org)
  • This discovery was made using transgenic newts, the use of which has only recently been made possible. (qubitsnews.com)
  • One of the researchers on the team, Martin Casco-Robles, from the Faculty of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Tsukuba, is a pioneer in developing techniques for the creation of transgenic newts. (qubitsnews.com)