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  • AEGLs
  • Used by emergency responders when dealing with chemical spills or other catastrophic exposures, AEGLs are set through a collaborative effort of the public and private sectors worldwide. (epa.gov)
  • toxins
  • Exposures to toxins during fetal and early childhood development are risk factors for learning and behavioral problems in children. (healthandenvironment.org)
  • Dr. Bruce Lanphear MD, MPH, has studied children's environmental health for nearly two decades and is currently principal investigator for the HOME Study, a 400-person birth cohort study, designed to examine the impact of low-level exposures to toxins on learning and behavioral problems in children. (healthandenvironment.org)
  • Can Stress And Low Level Exposure to Toxins Improve Health And Longevity? (donnieyance.com)
  • Almost daily, we are warned of the dangers of exposure to toxins from pollutants in our air, water, food, home, and workplace. (donnieyance.com)
  • The example of water as a potential toxin makes it obvious that not all potential toxins are toxic at any level. (donnieyance.com)
  • To understand how adaptogens support our bodies in dealing with toxins, let's take a look at detoxification on a cellular level. (donnieyance.com)
  • The mechanism of hormesis demonstrates that high levels of toxins cause damage resulting in death of the cell and eventually the corresponding organism, whereas low levels are capable of activating transcription factors that mediate the adaptive stress response, culminating in increased lifespan, improved health, and improved stress tolerance. (donnieyance.com)
  • As you can see from the illustration above, low levels of toxins activate different transcription factors (shown here in green) leading to downstream effects that increase the expression of important genes known to strengthen systemic defense mechanisms, including antioxidant enzymes, phase I and phase II detoxifying enzymes, heat shock proteins that act as important chaperones, and the unfolded protein response that is a major signal controlling cellular metabolism. (donnieyance.com)
  • PCBs
  • An earlier version of this Web page used the terminology "Recommended Public Health Levels for PCBs in Indoor School Air. (epa.gov)
  • EPA revised the terminology to "Exposure Levels for Evaluating PCBs in Indoor School Air" because the Agency believes the revised terminology better reflects the intended purpose of these levels. (epa.gov)
  • For example, if students spend more time in school than was assumed when calculating the values in the table, the levels of PCBs in the school's indoor air may have to be lower to prevent overall exposure from exceeding the RfD. (epa.gov)
  • serum
  • In addition, we investigated the association between brominated flame retardants and serum levels of FT3, FT4, and TSH. (ugent.be)
  • Consistently with experimental animal data, PBDE exposure was associated with changes in the motor function and the serum levels of the thyroid hormones. (ugent.be)
  • Outcome variables were self-reported physician diagnosis of gout and serum urate level. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • This study investigates the role of biocontaminants, including the relationship of exposure to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and fine particulate matter (of diameter of 2.5 µm [PM 2.5 ]) objectively measured in the farm settings (dwellings and workplaces) to serum cytokines involved in COPD, in a sample of 72 farmers from 50 farms in the Auvergne region, France. (dovepress.com)
  • Moreover, respiratory symptoms and diseases, including COPD, were associated with a decreased level of serum cytokines significantly in the case of IL5. (dovepress.com)
  • limits
  • Seiji Shiroya, a member of the Japan's safety commission, said the international organization's recommendation would be used as a reference point to possibly strengthen Japan's radiation exposure limits. (upi.com)
  • However, legal exposure limits to hazardous materials, as specified by government regulations, do not apply to all types of fibers that have similar and predictable biological effects. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • mercury
  • This duality is possible because many types of fish have low levels of mercury, so it is possible for a pregnant woman to eat nutritionally beneficial fish without being exposed to much mercury. (eurekalert.org)
  • These findings underscore the difficulties pregnant women face when trying to balance the nutritional benefits of fish intake with the potential detriments of low-level mercury exposure," said Dr. Korrick. (eurekalert.org)
  • Dr. Sagiv agrees this study provides an important public health message, saying, "Women need to know that nutrients in fish are good for the brain of a developing fetus, but women need to be aware that high mercury levels in some fish pose a risk. (eurekalert.org)
  • Researchers found an increased risk of childhood ADHD-related behaviors with increasing maternal hair mercury levels. (eurekalert.org)
  • These mercury levels were lower than levels shown to be potentially hazardous in most previous studies. (eurekalert.org)
  • 0.01
  • IL8: β: -0.82, CI: -1.4 to -0.2, P -value =0.005) and high exposure to VOCs according to a VOC global score with a decreased IL13 level (β: -0.5, CI: -0.9 to -0.1, P -value =0.01). (dovepress.com)
  • study
  • A new study reviews an existing framework of occupational risk management and describes possible methods for controlling exposure to nanomaterials in workplaces. (environmental-expert.com)
  • A new study has investigated five methods of estimating noise exposure and identified some of the reasons for variation in the data they produce. (environmental-expert.com)
  • In the NOAA study, scientists injected zebrafish two to four times a month over nine months with low levels of domoic acid in the laboratory. (noaa.gov)
  • The present study reports a case of occupational HP due to diisocyanates after low-level exposure. (ersjournals.com)
  • one epidemiological study in a plant engineered for minimal exposure to diisocyanates did not report cases suggestive of HP 4 . (ersjournals.com)
  • This study assesses the levels and sources of household air pollution in the urban slums of Nairobi. (burningissues.org)
  • An 18-year study shows an increased annual risk of death from respiratory illnesses, depending on the pollution level. (latimes.com)
  • But the 18-year study of nearly half a million people, reported today in the New England Journal of Medicine, is the first to show that long-term, low-level exposure to the pollutant can also be lethal. (latimes.com)
  • But the federal study found scientific evidence of other harmful health effects, besides those related to learning and behavior, at those low levels. (mcall.com)
  • workplaces
  • While asthma is the most prominent disease, hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) induced by diisocyanates has been reported casually 2 , but recent information suggests that in some workplaces, HP may be a more frequent consequence of diisocyanate exposure than originally thought 3 . (ersjournals.com)
  • data
  • It is difficult to compare estimates of noise exposure across EU Member States because the methods used to produce the data vary between countries. (environmental-expert.com)
  • They were interviewed about lung health and work history, providing data about particular exposure levels and the numbers of years they worked. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • School-specific exposure levels can be calculated if sufficient data are available. (epa.gov)
  • Data on fuel and stove types and ventilation use come from 1058 households, while air quality data based on the particulate matters (PM2.5) level were collected in a sub-sample of 72 households using the DustTrak™II Model 8532 monitor. (burningissues.org)
  • Researchers
  • The researchers also found that long-term, low-level exposure to domoic acid does not build tolerance or resistance to it, but instead makes zebrafish more sensitive to the neurotoxin. (noaa.gov)
  • The researchers found no increase in deaths from cardiovascular disease associated with ozone levels -- those deaths are caused primarily by the fine particulates present in air pollution. (latimes.com)
  • The researchers conclude in the journal Epidemiology that: 'Even low-level pollen exposure was associated with daily asthmatic symptoms [in children 4-12 years]. (ei-resource.org)
  • suggests
  • The latest epidemiological research suggests exposure to even very small amounts of certain pollen types can trigger symptoms in children who suffer from asthma. (ei-resource.org)
  • health
  • There has been mounting evidence that adverse health effects in children are caused at a much lower levels. (ecochildsplay.com)
  • CERC are partners in a new 5-year air quality (AQ) & health project that will develop a real-time, urban AQ modelling system capable of analysing and forecasting pollution levels in Hong Kong down to individual street level. (environmental-expert.com)
  • However, little evidence on pollution levels and health effects exists in low-income settings, especially slums. (burningissues.org)
  • Even a brief exposure to smoke raises blood pressure, ( no matter what your state of health ) and can cause blood clotting, stroke, or heart attack in vulnerable people. (burningissues.org)
  • Interestingly, this seems to indicate that low levels of stress, instead of being harmful, may have positive effects on health and longevity. (donnieyance.com)
  • children
  • Grass pollen exposures exceeding 2 grains per square meter were associated with wheeze, night symptoms, shortness of breath, and persistent cough compared with lower exposure among sensitized children. (ei-resource.org)
  • toxic
  • NOAA scientists and their colleagues have discovered a biological marker in the blood of laboratory zebrafish and marine mammals that shows when they have been repeatedly exposed to low levels of domoic acid, which is potentially toxic at high levels. (noaa.gov)
  • blood
  • The team found that those people who tested with the highest quintile of blood cadmium levels were significantly likely to have hearing loss at speech frequencies versus those in the lowest quintile, said Sung Kyun Park, ScD, MPH, of the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Michigan, and colleagues. (newsinferno.com)
  • Scientists found a similar antibody response in blood samples taken from wild sea lions from central California, confirming that natural exposure to the toxin produces a similar response in marine mammals. (noaa.gov)
  • risk
  • Los Angeles had the second-highest ozone level and a 43% increase in risk. (latimes.com)
  • In contrast, San Francisco had the lowest average ozone level (33 ppb) of the 96 regions studied and only a 14% increased risk, probably because of the fog and prevailing winds, which reduce ozone formation. (latimes.com)
  • After adjustment for renal function, diabetes, diuretic use, hypertension, race, body mass index, income, and education level, the highest BLL quartile was associated with a 3.6-fold higher risk for gout and a 1.9-fold higher risk for hyperuricemia compared with the lowest quartile. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • However, clinicians must weigh the diagnostic benefit of CT against the risk posed by radiation exposure. (stlouischildrens.org)
  • harm
  • Many companies promote products that claim heavy duty "cleansing" of our organ systems, encouraging extreme approaches that can actually cause more harm to the body than the exposure itself. (donnieyance.com)
  • high levels
  • Since the early 1990s, regular monitoring of shellfish has protected people from amnesic shellfish poisoning caused by high levels of domoic acid. (noaa.gov)
  • Residents of the two slums are exposed to high levels of PM2.5 in their homes. (burningissues.org)