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  • Centers for Diseas
  • Mounting evidence that children can experience learning and behavior problems from low-level lead exposure prompted the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention last month to cut in half the level of lead in young children's blood at which health authorities are urged to intervene. (mcall.com)
  • inhalation
  • For non-school exposures, inhalation of indoor air and dietary intake account for the largest portions of total PCB exposures in uncontaminated buildings. (epa.gov)
  • Pulmonary toxicity from multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) inhalation exposure is well described and includes lung epithelial hyperplasia, inflammation, and fibrosis. (cdc.gov)
  • To address this question, a 19d inhalation exposure to MWCNT in C57BL/6J mice with daily alveolar depositions of 2340 ng (=1000 d of human exposure), 234 ng (=100 d), and 23.4 ng (=10d) was conducted. (cdc.gov)
  • biomarkers
  • Multiple regression models accounting for potential confounders were used to investigate the associations between biomarkers of internal exposure to brominated flame retardants [serum levels of polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) congeners 47, 99, 100, 153, 209, hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD), and tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA)] and cognitive performance. (ugent.be)
  • Touil N, Vande Aka P, Buchet J, Thierens H, Kirsch-Volders M. Assessment of genotoxic effects related to chronic low level exposure to ionizing radiation using biomarkers for DNA damage and repair. (ugent.be)
  • To quantify the contribution of risk factors, he tests various ways to measure children's exposures to environmental toxicants using novel biomarkers measured during pregnancy and early childhood. (healthandenvironment.org)
  • limits
  • Seiji Shiroya, a member of the Japan's safety commission, said the international organization's recommendation would be used as a reference point to possibly strengthen Japan's radiation exposure limits. (upi.com)
  • The present authors conclude that concentrations of diisocyanates far below current exposure limits may induce hypersensitivity pneumonitis in susceptible subjects. (ersjournals.com)
  • However, legal exposure limits to hazardous materials, as specified by government regulations, do not apply to all types of fibers that have similar and predictable biological effects. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • This meeting is an open public forum for parties and individuals interested in Cal/OSHA's project for updating of Table AC-1, Permissible Exposure Limits for Chemical Contaminants (PELs), in Section 5155 of Title 8 of the California Code of Regulations (8 CCR 5155). (ca.gov)
  • concern
  • The developing brain is of particular concern because lead exposure can have long-lasting effects that can continue well into puberty and beyond. (newsinferno.com)
  • In the UK a number of occupational groups have expressed concern that their health has been affected by exposure to organophosphates," explains Dr Virginia Harrison (Open University), co-author of the study. (healthcanal.com)
  • Japanese Industry Minister Banri Kaieda Tuesday apologized to the public, especially fishermen, for causing concern about the process but assured the discharge of the low-level radioactive water posed no major health risk. (upi.com)
  • For more than 20 years, the 'level of concern' in young children had been 10 micrograms of lead per deciliter of blood. (mcall.com)
  • study
  • The author suggests that the critical issue most in need of further study involves the adverse effects of maternal and paternal lead exposure upon the reproductive process. (cdc.gov)
  • The present study supports the hypothesis that environmental cadmium and lead exposures at levels currently observed in the U.S. may increase the risk of hearing loss, the third leading chronic condition experienced by adults ages 65 and older," the team wrote. (newsinferno.com)
  • We also wrote that another study revealed that childhood exposure to lead dust is linked to violence. (newsinferno.com)
  • A new study shares that children who have low levels of lead exposure (under 3.8 mcg/L) had cardiovascular systems that were not a good at handling stress, and that could eventually lead to high blood pressure. (ecochildsplay.com)
  • This is a preliminary study, but it certainly adds to the chorus of research about the dangers of low level exposures to lead in children. (ecochildsplay.com)
  • A new study reviews an existing framework of occupational risk management and describes possible methods for controlling exposure to nanomaterials in workplaces. (environmental-expert.com)
  • A new study has investigated five methods of estimating noise exposure and identified some of the reasons for variation in the data they produce. (environmental-expert.com)
  • This study paves the way for creating reliable blood tests for low-level domoic acid exposure, which could help scientists assess the effects of chronic exposure to both wildlife and people who eat seafood," said Kathi Lefebvre, Ph.D., a NOAA fisheries biologist and the lead author of the study. (noaa.gov)
  • In the NOAA study, scientists injected zebrafish two to four times a month over nine months with low levels of domoic acid in the laboratory. (noaa.gov)
  • The present study reports a case of occupational HP due to diisocyanates after low-level exposure. (ersjournals.com)
  • one epidemiological study in a plant engineered for minimal exposure to diisocyanates did not report cases suggestive of HP 4 . (ersjournals.com)
  • In a study published in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine , researchers show similar results even for workers who were exposed to the material - from a mine in Libby, Montana - at or below current legal levels. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • An 18-year study shows an increased annual risk of death from respiratory illnesses, depending on the pollution level. (latimes.com)
  • But the 18-year study of nearly half a million people, reported today in the New England Journal of Medicine, is the first to show that long-term, low-level exposure to the pollutant can also be lethal. (latimes.com)
  • This study assesses the levels and sources of household air pollution in the urban slums of Nairobi. (burningissues.org)
  • In this study, a pre-operational radiological baseline of the site and the occupational radiation exposures due to radon progeny in the mine were determined. (rsc.org)
  • Fifty-three cases of peritoneal mesothelioma were included in the study, and of those 40 patients or their next of kin were interviewed to determine whether asbestos exposure was present, and what the intensity of the exposure was. (mesothelioma-attorney.com)
  • The study found a significant association between asbestos exposure and peritoneal mesothelioma, but it also found that many of the asbestos exposures leading to peritoneal mesothelioma were lower than had previously been described in the literature. (mesothelioma-attorney.com)
  • The authors of the study noted that prior studies often do not separate out peritoneal mesotheliomas from pleural mesotheliomas, and those that do have not had good access to asbestos exposure histories. (mesothelioma-attorney.com)
  • Their study indicated that relatively low exposures can result in peritoneal mesotheliomas, and it supported the hypothesis that there is no threshold of exposure below which peritoneal mesotheliomas will not occur. (mesothelioma-attorney.com)
  • A recent government study, prepared with help of researchers from Johns Hopkins' Bloomberg School of Public Health, tallies the wide-ranging damage low-level lead exposure can do, beyond the well-documented effects of reducing youngsters' IQ and undermining their ability to learn and control their behavior. (mcall.com)
  • But the federal study found scientific evidence of other harmful health effects, besides those related to learning and behavior, at those low levels. (mcall.com)
  • The study also found adults had increased blood pressure and greater risk of hypertension at similar lead levels. (mcall.com)
  • But the federal research team and a group of independent scientists serving as technical advisors chose to broaden the study to look at all documental health effects from low levels of lead. (mcall.com)
  • The objective of this study was to compare radiation exposure levels of the operating physician during coronary interventions when incorporating both radial and femoral artery approaches. (springer.com)
  • The study design was prospective and observational, in which we measured the radiation exposure of the patient and the operator. (springer.com)
  • Dr. Sagiv agrees this study provides an important public health message, saying, "Women need to know that nutrients in fish are good for the brain of a developing fetus, but women need to be aware that high mercury levels in some fish pose a risk. (eurekalert.org)
  • Low-level lead exposure and the prevalence of gout: an observational study. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • Krishnan E, Lingala B, Bhalla V. Low-level lead exposure and the prevalence of gout: an observational study. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • TY - JOUR T1 - Low-level lead exposure and the prevalence of gout: an observational study. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • Behavioral
  • Behavioral problems related to lead exposure include hyperactivity, difficulty in task performance, deficiency in intelligence quotient, and nerve conduction deficits. (cdc.gov)
  • They explained how new research shows even low levels of lead (blood levels lower than what is considered "safe" at 5 mcg/L )can lead to multiple problems for growing children, such as reading problems, behavioral and attention problems, school failure, and a decreased IQ . (ecochildsplay.com)
  • effectively
  • The health effects on any individual from tiny doses of lead may seem minor compared with the risk of retardation and even death at very high levels, Navas-Acien said, but widespread low-level exposure could effectively lower the intelligence and hurt the health of a broad segment of the population. (mcall.com)
  • OSHA
  • Earlier this month it was reported at ClaimsJournal.com that the U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has fined a marble and granite company over $40,000 for health and safety violations that included workers being exposed to unsafe levels of crystalline silica particles. (environmental-expert.com)
  • Both users and nonusers nay be interested to know that OSHA has lowered the Permissible Exposure Level (PEL) for benzene from 10 to 1 part per million (PPM), effective Dec. 10 for all industries covered by OSHA, including conservation laboratories. (conservation-us.org)
  • concentrations
  • Serum levels above the level of quantification were associated with an average decrease of FT3 level by 0.18 pg/mL (95% CI: 0.03 to 0.34, p = 0.020) for PBDE-99 and by 0.15 pg/mL (95% CI: 0.004 to 0.29, p = 0.045) for PBDE-100, compared with concentrations below the level of quantification. (ugent.be)
  • PBDE-47 level above the level of quantification was associated with an average increase of TSH levels by 10.1% (95% CI: 0.8% to 20.2%, p = 0.033), compared with concentrations below the level of quantification. (ugent.be)
  • EPA calculated the school indoor air PCB concentrations that would result in an estimated total exposure equal to the RfD when all other school and non-school PCB exposure pathways were set to average background levels. (epa.gov)
  • Assuming that PCB exposures through pathways other than school indoor air are equal to average background PCB exposures for those pathways, these indoor school air concentrations should keep total exposure below the oral RfD of 20 ng PCB/kg-day. (epa.gov)
  • Similarly, PCB concentrations in a school's outdoor soils or indoor dusts greater than those in non-school environments would indicate a potential for increased exposure from these pathways. (epa.gov)
  • Thus, school indoor air concentrations would need to be decreased to maintain overall exposure below the RfD. (epa.gov)
  • below
  • The toxic effects of high level poisoning are well established but the possibility that long-term low-level exposure to OPs in doses below that causing acute toxicity causes ill health is controversial. (healthcanal.com)
  • EPA has calculated exposure levels for evaluation that are intended to maintain overall PCB exposures below the oral reference dose (RfD) of 20 ng PCB/kg body weight per day. (epa.gov)
  • Additionally, the calculated indoor air levels in the table below have been revised to reflect more recent data on dietary exposure. (epa.gov)
  • Based on exposure predictions, considerable years of exposure may be necessary at facilities operating at an inhalable concentration of 10 mg/m3 or below to elicit marked molecular changes. (cdc.gov)
  • humans
  • While little is known about how low-level exposure to domoic acid affects marine animals or humans, high-level exposure through eating contaminated seafood can be toxic, and can lead to amnesic shellfish poisoning, with symptoms such as seizures, short-term memory loss, and, in rare cases, death. (noaa.gov)
  • Up until now, the absence of a marker for such chronic exposure has been a barrier to accurately assessing possible effects to humans. (noaa.gov)
  • At the DEHP-doses observed in humans, DEHP-exposure therefore does not represent a relevant cancer risk to humans. (greenfacts.org)
  • Toxicology
  • There does not appear to be a really safe level of lead exposure,' said Andrew A. Rooney, a senior health scientist with the National Toxicology Program who coordinated the review of existing research. (mcall.com)
  • effects
  • There has been mounting evidence that adverse health effects in children are caused at a much lower levels. (ecochildsplay.com)
  • More evidence about the troubling effects of low level lead exposure were reported recently on MSNBC. (ecochildsplay.com)
  • Synergistic cellular effects including mitochondrial destabilization, autophagy and apoptosis following low-level exposure to a mixture of lipophilic persistent organic pollutants. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • Nominations for studies were reviewed based on the frequency of use, extent of exposure and background exposure, number of workers exposed, severity and type of adverse health effects, technical feasibility of controls, and availability of sampling and analytical methods. (cdc.gov)
  • However, little evidence on pollution levels and health effects exists in low-income settings, especially slums. (burningissues.org)
  • Rather, the finding of widespread health effects at low levels should provide further impetus for eliminating lead exposure, they said. (mcall.com)
  • Collaborative
  • Used by emergency responders when dealing with chemical spills or other catastrophic exposures, AEGLs are set through a collaborative effort of the public and private sectors worldwide. (epa.gov)
  • lead
  • Low-level exposure to lead in the workplace. (cdc.gov)
  • Low level lead exposure: the clinical implications of current research. (cdc.gov)
  • Criteria for lead (7439921) exposure standards in the workplace are discussed. (cdc.gov)
  • There is evidence that peripheral motor disease may be related to a history of increased lead exposure. (cdc.gov)
  • lead has an adverse effect on learning ability in offspring, with both maternal and paternal lead exposure. (cdc.gov)
  • We have also written that lead can accumulate in the body over time and pregnant women, infants, and young children, especially, should avoid exposure to lead. (newsinferno.com)
  • Mold is a natural part of the environment and people breathe it on a daily basis, but exposure to elevated levels of mold in the air in homes, schools or work environments can lead to indoor air quality (IAQ) issues and potential exposure concerns. (environmental-expert.com)
  • His primary research has been on quantifying and preventing the adverse consequences of low-level lead toxicity. (healthandenvironment.org)
  • Dr. Ana Navas-Acien, physician-epidemiologist at Johns Hopkins' Bloomberg School of Public Health, has done research on the link between cardiovascular disease and low-level lead exposure. (mcall.com)
  • Despite dramatic progress in reducing Americans' exposure to lead over the past 25 years, a growing body of research finds that children and adults still face health risks from even very low levels of the toxic metal in their blood. (mcall.com)
  • The best course of action,' he added, 'is to eliminate all lead exposure from our environment. (mcall.com)
  • In some areas, the report concluded that there was only limited research to date linking low-level lead exposure with cardiovascular disease . (mcall.com)
  • In addition to the risks of heart attack death, she said, there's some research linking low-level lead exposure to peripheral arterial disease, in which it becomes painful to walk or stand. (mcall.com)
  • While low-level lead exposure may harm people at all ages, Rooney and Navas-Acien said that for the most part, there's little to be done for adults. (mcall.com)
  • Chelation therapy, in which chemical compounds are injected to remove metals from the body, only work when lead is at much higher levels. (mcall.com)
  • Lead toxicity can lead to gouty arthritis (gout), but whether the low lead exposure in the contemporary general population confers risk for gout is not known. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • Blood lead level was the principal exposure variable. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • Blood lead level does not necessarily reflect the total body lead burden. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • Blood lead levels in the range currently considered acceptable are associated with increased prevalence of gout and hyperuricemia. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • Risk
  • Among workers who had the highest exposure levels, there was about a 6 to 16 times increase in risk of pleural changes compared to minimally-exposed workers. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Los Angeles had the second-highest ozone level and a 43% increase in risk. (latimes.com)
  • In contrast, San Francisco had the lowest average ozone level (33 ppb) of the 96 regions studied and only a 14% increased risk, probably because of the fog and prevailing winds, which reduce ozone formation. (latimes.com)
  • After adjustment for renal function, diabetes, diuretic use, hypertension, race, body mass index, income, and education level, the highest BLL quartile was associated with a 3.6-fold higher risk for gout and a 1.9-fold higher risk for hyperuricemia compared with the lowest quartile. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • radiation levels
  • Currently, the government said outside radiation levels greater than 50 millisieverts require evacuation and levels exceeding 10 millisieverts mean residents should remain indoors, Kyodo News reported. (upi.com)
  • Measurements of radiation levels were made using an electronic personal dosimeter (Diamentor® E2-DAP) at the radial and at the femoral artery access sites. (springer.com)
  • serum
  • In addition, we investigated the association between brominated flame retardants and serum levels of FT3, FT4, and TSH. (ugent.be)
  • Consistently with experimental animal data, PBDE exposure was associated with changes in the motor function and the serum levels of the thyroid hormones. (ugent.be)
  • Outcome variables were self-reported physician diagnosis of gout and serum urate level. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • cardiovascular disease
  • The researchers found no increase in deaths from cardiovascular disease associated with ozone levels -- those deaths are caused primarily by the fine particulates present in air pollution. (latimes.com)
  • found
  • Scientists found a similar antibody response in blood samples taken from wild sea lions from central California, confirming that natural exposure to the toxin produces a similar response in marine mammals. (noaa.gov)
  • The researchers also found that long-term, low-level exposure to domoic acid does not build tolerance or resistance to it, but instead makes zebrafish more sensitive to the neurotoxin. (noaa.gov)
  • No differences were found between groups, either for smoking or for exposure status. (ugent.be)
  • data
  • It is difficult to compare estimates of noise exposure across EU Member States because the methods used to produce the data vary between countries. (environmental-expert.com)
  • They were interviewed about lung health and work history, providing data about particular exposure levels and the numbers of years they worked. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • School-specific exposure levels can be calculated if sufficient data are available. (epa.gov)
  • Data on fuel and stove types and ventilation use come from 1058 households, while air quality data based on the particulate matters (PM2.5) level were collected in a sub-sample of 72 households using the DustTrak™II Model 8532 monitor. (burningissues.org)
  • adverse
  • Between 1985 and 1998 more than 600 reports of ill health following exposure to sheep dip were received by a government adverse reaction surveillance scheme. (healthcanal.com)
  • lower
  • All of the mean values of radon progeny were lower than the action levels for working places recommended in the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) 65. (rsc.org)
  • toxic
  • NOAA scientists and their colleagues have discovered a biological marker in the blood of laboratory zebrafish and marine mammals that shows when they have been repeatedly exposed to low levels of domoic acid, which is potentially toxic at high levels. (noaa.gov)
  • radioactive
  • Adding to the concerns of food contamination is Tokyo Electric's program to release low-level radioactive water into the Pacific, which Tokyo Electric hoped would provide additional storage for the more contaminated water in the basement of the reactor buildings. (upi.com)
  • The assessment of the radiation exposure from coal burning is critically dependent on the specific activity of radioactive elements in coal and in the fly ash that remains after combustion . (rsc.org)
  • indoor
  • Non-school exposure pathways include indoor and outdoor air, indoor dust, outside soils and diet. (epa.gov)
  • School exposure pathways include school indoor and outdoor air, indoor dust, and nearby outside soils. (epa.gov)
  • We measured PM2.5 levels mainly during daytime and using sources of indoor air pollutions. (burningissues.org)
  • We recommend interventions, especially those focusing on clean cookstoves and lighting fuels to mitigate indoor levels of fine particles. (burningissues.org)
  • high
  • Since the early 1990s, regular monitoring of shellfish has protected people from amnesic shellfish poisoning caused by high levels of domoic acid. (noaa.gov)
  • Results indicated marked inflammation at the high dose that was sustained through 84 d post-exposure. (cdc.gov)
  • In households where air quality was monitored, the mean PM2.5 levels were high and varied widely, especially during the evenings (124.6 g/m3 SD: 372.7 in Korogocho and 82.2 g/m3 SD: 249.9 in Viwandani), and in households using charcoal (126.5 g/m3 SD: 434.7 in Korogocho and 75.7 g/m3 SD: 323.0 in Viwandani). (burningissues.org)
  • Residents of the two slums are exposed to high levels of PM2.5 in their homes. (burningissues.org)
  • relevant
  • We suggest that exposure to low, environmentally relevant levels of Hg, disrupts tolerance by interfering with BCR signaling in immature B cells, potentially leading to the appearance of mature auto-reactive B cells which have the ability to contribute to auto-immune disease. (ovid.com)
  • However, at levels relevant to workplace exposures the contributing molecular mechanisms are not well described. (cdc.gov)