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  • involve
  • To limit the risk of prenatal radiation exposure as a trigger for leukemia (especially ALL), women who are pregnant or who suspect that they might be pregnant should always inform their doctors before undergoing tests or medical procedures that involve radiation (such as X-rays). (kidshealth.org)
  • Cutis
  • Leukemia cutis is the infiltration of neoplastic leukocytes or their precursors into the skin resulting in clinically identifiable cutaneous lesions. (wikipedia.org)
  • viral or bacterial infections
  • The following are symptoms of leukemia that lead doctors to look for different types of juvenile leukemia: feelings of fatigue repetitive viral or bacterial infections bone and joint pain abdominal pain which may cause loss of appetite and weight loss in a child swollen lymph nodes under the arms, in the groin, chest and neck. (wikipedia.org)
  • infection
  • To determine whether a child has leukemia, a doctor will do a physical examination to check for signs of infection, anemia, abnormal bleeding, and swollen lymph nodes. (kidshealth.org)
  • If the the donor had a leukemia that was the result of infection with HTLV-I (Human T-cell Leukemia Virus type I, causative agent of Adult T-cell Leukemia and Tropical Spastic Paraparesis), then there is the very real possibility that the recipient may also develope leukemia. (bio.net)
  • chemotherapy
  • While the exact cause(s) of leukemia is not known, risk factors have been identified, including radiation exposure, certain chemotherapy for cancer , smoking , family history of leukemia, and exposure to certain chemicals such as benzene. (medicinenet.com)
  • Most people with leukemia are treated with chemotherapy. (medicinenet.com)
  • Children who have received prior radiation or chemotherapy for other types of cancer also have a higher risk for leukemia, as do kids who are receiving medical drugs to suppress their immune systems after organ transplants. (kidshealth.org)
  • leukemic
  • This condition may be contrasted with leukemids, which are skin lesions that occur with leukemia, but which are not related to leukemic cell infiltration. (wikipedia.org)
  • affects
  • Leukemia inhibitory factor, or LIF, is an interleukin 6 class cytokine that affects cell growth by inhibiting differentiation. (wikipedia.org)