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  • Neurology
  • The first step in neurology cases is to localise the lesion, but that can be challenging, particularly if it is not something you do frequently. (vin.com)
  • clinical
  • The NeuroMap and associated table are simple aids that have been distilled from years of clinical practice and can assist you in localising lesions. (vin.com)
  • Clinical signs of dysfunction indicate that a lesion is disrupting that neural system. (vin.com)
  • As the clinical signs of spinal cord disease are characteristic for each of these regions, animals are considered to have a region-specific localisation: e.g., thoracolumbar disease. (vin.com)
  • 97.6%) sensitivity for diagnosis of intradural spinal cord lesions but specificity varied before and after provision of clinical data (68.6% vs. 82.4%, P = 0.023). (avmi.net)
  • Sensitivity was lower for classifying inflammatory lesions but improved with provision of clinical data (48.1% vs. 81.5%, P = 0.015). (avmi.net)
  • Despite the traditional use of acupuncture for treatment of different clinical conditions in China, access to research involving Chinese acupuncture is hampered by language constraints and studies involving the use of acupuncture for treatment of spinal cord injuries are hard to come by [ 5 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • While at the onset of the disease there is no worsening of symptoms between attacks, subsets of patients eventually experience progression of neurological deficits between attacks (termed secondary progressive MS). In contrast to the relapsing and remitting course, a smaller group of patients follows a gradually progressive clinical course termed primary progressive MS. (ama-assn.org)
  • The McDonald criteria, as revised in 2005 [8, attempt to formalize a means to incorporate clinical symptoms, imaging, and tests in the diagnosis of MS. The requirement for dissemination in space and time is achieved with adjunctive laboratory tests and imaging, namely MRI imaging of brain and spinal cord, CSF fluid analysis, and functional assays of the nervous system such as evoked potentials. (ama-assn.org)
  • The pathways of importance (Fig. 18.8) in clinical diagnosis decussate in the medulla and pass to the contralateral halves of the cord as the crossed lateral corticospinal tracts. (medassignments.com)
  • Injury Rehabilitation
  • The Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation (SCIRehab) project , a 5-year project led by the Rocky Mountain Regional Spinal Injury System (RMRSIS) at Craig Hospital, used practice-based evidence (PBE) research to identify the rehabilitation interventions most strongly associated with positive outcomes. (medscape.com)
  • dysfunction
  • The aim of the study was to investigate S100 β levels in the cerebrospinal fluid of nonambulatory dogs with intervertebral disk disease treated with electroacupuncture: 10 dogs with thoracolumbar disk extrusion graded 3 to 5 (EA group) and 7 dogs without neurologic dysfunction (control group). (hindawi.com)
  • Atrophy
  • These include the loss of muscle mass due to atrophy below the level of the spinal cord lesion, an increase in body fat, and a general decrease in the ability to maintain cardiovascular or aerobic fitness. (jik.com)
  • abnormalities
  • Insulin resistance results in multiple metabolic and blood pressure abnormalities that can increase the risk of developing the atherosclerotic-type of heart disease. (jik.com)
  • Contributing to the metabolic abnormalities are certain physical changes associated with spinal cord injury that increase the risk of CHD development. (jik.com)
  • it shows signal abnormalities, usually T2 hyperintensity, focal or extensive, gadolinium enhancement and sometimes cord swelling. (rutgers.edu)
  • however small multiple enhancing lesions are more suggestive of MS (or lupus) while extensive, multilevel abnormalities reflect vasculitis as in antiphospholipid antibody syndrome. (rutgers.edu)
  • paralysis
  • Expression profiling of gene expression in SOD1-G93A transgenic mouse spinal cords indicates extensive glial activation coincident with the onset of paralysis at 3 months of age. (docme.ru)
  • Ann Neurol 2001;50:730 -740 An important clue to the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) was provided by the discovery of mutations in the SOD1 gene encoding copper, zincsuperoxide dismutase (cu,zn SOD) in patients with a familial form of ALS.1 ALS causes the progressive loss of motor neurons from cortex, brainstem, and spinal cord with consequent paralysis and death. (docme.ru)
  • Nevertheless, acupuncture has been used for treatment of thoracolumbar intervertebral disk disease (IVDD) [ 6 - 8 ] and spinal cord injuries with paralysis and paresis [ 9 ] in dogs. (hindawi.com)
  • pathology
  • Deliberate induction of myelin-targeting autoimmunity in animal models results in CNS inflammation and pathology that recapitulates some features of human MS, although the degree to which these models resemble human disease varies depending on how autoimmunity is induced and on the species or strain of animal used ( 8 - 10 ). (frontiersin.org)
  • Extensive pathology develops in the spinal cord well before the display of overt symptoms of motor neuron disease. (docme.ru)
  • extra-axial spinal pathology, however, has more often a chronic and progressive presentation. (rutgers.edu)
  • segmental
  • Buerger's disease (BD) is characterised by segmental inflammation of medium and small size arteries, affects mainly young adult men, and is more prevalent in the southeast Mediterranean and the Far East. (bmj.com)
  • symptoms
  • Symptoms that have a waning course with recurrences and worsen over time suggest a disease that destroys nerve cells. (healthofchildren.com)
  • This delay in the appearance of symptoms is related to the degree of strain placed on the spinal cord over time which may become more evident during sports and pregnancy. (onlymyhealth.com)
  • Pressure of fluid may cause cysts to form syringomyelia in the spinal cord which can lead to further loss of movement, feeling or the onset of pain or automatic symptoms. (onlymyhealth.com)
  • While in adults, surgery is done to free the spinal cord can reduce the size and further development of cysts in the cord and may restore some function or alleviate other symptoms. (onlymyhealth.com)
  • What are the symptoms of Tethered Spinal Cord Syndrome? (onlymyhealth.com)
  • Injuries
  • Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is perhaps the most devastating orthopedic injury, and with prolonged survival being the rule, rehabilitation of these injuries has an increasingly important role. (medscape.com)
  • S100 β may be associated with neuroplasticity following spinal cord injuries with intervertebral disk extrusion. (hindawi.com)
  • destruction
  • This is followed by activation of genes involved in metal ion regulation (metallothionein-I, metallothionein-III, ferritin-H, and ferritin-L) at 4 months of age just prior to end-stage disease, perhaps as an adaptive response to the mitochondrial destruction caused by the mutant protein. (docme.ru)
  • refers
  • Disc lesion refers to a disruption of annular fibers and subsequent displacement of nuclear material. (ilchiro.org)
  • periphery
  • The anatomy of DRG neurons has been described as pseudounipolar, meaning that they possess a single-branched axon, which extends both into the periphery to associate with sensory receptors and into the spinal cord to form synapses with second-order neurons in either the dorsal gray matter or brainstem nuclei ( 4 ). (frontiersin.org)
  • etiology
  • The presence of infiltrating immune cells in MS CNS tissues, including potentially myelin-specific T and B cells, supports a primary immune etiology for disease ( 3 - 6 ), as do studies that have identified genes associated with the immune system, immune regulation, and antigen presentation as the primary genetic risk factors for MS ( 7 ). (frontiersin.org)
  • hemiplegia
  • In a severe lesion (e.g. an infarct of the internal capsule causing hemiplegia) this response can be elicited from a wide area of the affected limb. (medassignments.com)
  • disorders
  • Disorders of the somatosensory system such as neuropathic pain are common in people with chronic neurologic and musculoskeletal diseases, yet these conditions remain an underappreciated morbidity in veterinary patients. (frontiersin.org)
  • Disorders of the somatosensory system such as neuropathic pain affect up to 8% of the general population and up to 90% of people living with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI), yet these conditions remain an underappreciated morbidity in veterinary patients ( 1 , 2 ). (frontiersin.org)
  • Most women with chronic neurological disease who become pregnant will have successful outcomes, but some disorders have specific risks. (mhmedical.com)
  • gene
  • The disease has an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance, indicating that one copy of the mutant gene is sufficient to cause disease. (docme.ru)
  • lower
  • Lesions without mechanical compression may produce only local discomfort and pain, or sensory disturbances that radiate into the buttock or lower extremity, sometimes below the knee. (ilchiro.org)
  • MS lesions showed a large reduction in MTR, with old lesions exhibiting a lower MTR than new lesions. (ajnr.org)
  • test
  • Researchers in the School of Cellular and Molecular Medicine focus on studying how the immune system causes these diseases, using models systems that allow us to test the effects of interventions that target specific molecular pathways, as well as basic lymphocyte signal transduction mechanisms underlying altered cellular function (Christoph Wuelfing). (bristol.ac.uk)
  • By noting from these test results which systems are functioning normally and which are abnormal, then by referring to the NeuroMap (and accompanying table), you can determine where the lesion is likely to be cited. (vin.com)
  • Recent studies by Bauman and Spungen demonstrated that people with a spinal cord injury who were less fit on a cardiovascular test were more likely to be insulin resistant. (jik.com)
  • wound
  • SCS were used in all three patients to manage intractable pain, poor wound healing, and recurrence of ischaemic lesions occurring postoperatively. (bmj.com)
  • describe
  • The most accepted nomenclature for disc lesions is the use of the term "protrusion" to describe bulging of an intact annulus, "extrusion" to describe contiguous nuclear material that has herniated through the annulus, and "sequestration" to describe a detached nuclear fragment. (ilchiro.org)