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  • Medieval Latin
  • Medieval Latin had been the practical working language of the Roman Catholic Church, taught throughout Europe to aspiring clerics and refined in the medieval universities. (wikipedia.org)
  • The heyday of New Latin was its first two centuries (1500-1700), when in the continuation of the Medieval Latin tradition, it served as the lingua franca of science, education, and to some degree diplomacy in Europe. (wikipedia.org)
  • definition
  • In 1874, John Wordsworth used this definition: "By Early Latin I understand Latin of the whole period of the Republic, which is separated very strikingly, both in tone and in outward form, from that of the Empire. (wikipedia.org)
  • Uses a social problems approach to look at two controversial Latin American issues since the late 1960's: the tension between adopting a procedural vs. a substantive definition of democracy, and the emphasis on political vs. socioeconomic factors in explaining democratization. (temple.edu)
  • extinct
  • Though Latin and New Latin are considered extinct (having no native speakers), large parts of their vocabulary have seeped into English and several Germanic languages. (wikipedia.org)
  • Rhythms
  • Manhattan Latin (subtitled The Sensuous Rhythms of Spanish Harlem) is an album by American jazz vibraphonist Dave Pike which was recorded in 1964 for the Decca label. (wikipedia.org)
  • Fulanito and their LP "El hombre mas famoso de la tierra" is a good combination of house and Latin-American rhythms from that time. (wikipedia.org)
  • scholarly
  • New Latin (also called Neo-Latin or Modern Latin) was a revival in the use of Latin in original, scholarly, and scientific works between c. 1375 and c. 1900. (wikipedia.org)
  • Modern scholarly and technical nomenclature, such as in zoological and botanical taxonomy and international scientific vocabulary, draws extensively from New Latin vocabulary. (wikipedia.org)
  • Particularly since the Renaissance , Latin has also been the scholarly and literary seed-corn for the VERNACULAR European languages. (encyclopedia.com)
  • He chose Latin to ensure that the Principia would be widely read, but later wrote Opticks in English, its date of publication (1704) marking the point at which significant scholarly work began to appear in English first and, in due course, without any translation into Latin. (encyclopedia.com)
  • A large part of the lexicon of Latin has entered English in two major waves: mainly religious vocabulary from the time of Old English until the Reformation, and mainly scientific, scholarly, and legal vocabulary (slightly different in English and Scottish law), from the Middle Ages onwards. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Tongue
  • Thomas Sheridan wrote several mnemonic poems, with the intention of helping students to remember various parts of Latin grammar, prosody, and rhetoric, which were published as An Easy Introduction of Grammar in English for the Understanding of the Latin Tongue and A Method to Improve the Fancy. (wikipedia.org)
  • lexicon
  • In the case of English, about 60% of its lexicon can trace its origin to Latin, thus many English speakers can recognize New Latin terms with relative ease as cognates are quite common. (wikipedia.org)
  • scholars
  • Over the 377 years from 452 to 75 BC, Old Latin evolved from being partially comprehensible by classicists with study to being easily read by scholars. (wikipedia.org)
  • His example was followed in England by such scholars as Aldhelm (7c), Bede (7-8c), Alcuin (8-9c), and AELFRIC (10-11c), while the translations from Latin into OLD ENGLISH by King ALFRED of Wessex (9c) laid the foundation of early English prose writing. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Such scholars as William Camden wrote by preference in Latin, considering that to use English was to write in sand, and for major contributors to the canon of English literature , such as John Milton, Latin was an essential professional tool. (encyclopedia.com)
  • likewise
  • The end of the New Latin period is likewise indeterminate, but Latin as a regular vehicle of communicating ideas became rare after the first few decades of the 19th century, and by 1900 it survived primarily in international scientific vocabulary and taxonomy. (wikipedia.org)
  • writings
  • The use of "old", "early" and "archaic" has been standard in publications of Old Latin writings since at least the 18th century. (wikipedia.org)
  • Renaissance
  • Classicists use the term "Neo-Latin" to describe the Latin that developed in Renaissance Italy as a result of renewed interest in classical civilization in the 14th and 15th centuries. (wikipedia.org)
  • After the Renaissance the writing of Latin was increasingly confined to the narrow limits of certain ecclesiastical and academic publications. (britannica.com)
  • It does, however, provide a broad overview of the literary works produced in Latin by European writers during the Middle Ages and Renaissance. (britannica.com)
  • generally
  • Latin honors are often conferred upon law school students graduating as a Juris Doctor or J.D., in which case they are generally based upon class rank or grade point average. (wikipedia.org)
  • sought
  • The humanist reformers sought both to purify Latin grammar and style, and to make Latin applicable to concerns beyond the ecclesiastical, creating a body of Latin literature outside the bounds of the Church. (wikipedia.org)
  • formal
  • For centuries, formal education in the British Isles has been closely associated with the teaching and learning of Latin. (encyclopedia.com)
  • literature
  • The period during and after the Reformation, coinciding with the growth of printed literature, saw the growth of an immense body of New Latin literature, on all kinds of secular as well as religious subjects. (wikipedia.org)
  • 0145. Other Voices: Black, Native Peoples, and Women in Latin American Literature (3 s.h. (temple.edu)
  • This article focuses primarily on ancient Latin literature. (britannica.com)
  • dictionaries
  • In the 17c, such makers of English dictionaries as John Bullokar deliberately converted Latin words into English, building on the already strong French component of the vocabulary so as to create a Latinate register of education and refinement. (encyclopedia.com)
  • found
  • For example, in Britten's opera The Turn of the Screw, he used the words of a Latin mnemonic that he had found in a Latin grammar book belonging to Myfanwy Piper's aunt for Miles' "malo" song. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although simple alliteration involving only the initial consonants of words is very common, in Latin authors of all periods it will often be found that primary alliteration on an initial consonant is accompanied by a secondary or "minor" alliteration on a medial consonant. (wikipedia.org)
  • traditions
  • Unlike the Latin Church, the Pope does not exercise a direct patriarchal role over the Eastern Catholic churches and their faithful, instead encouring their internal hierarchies separate from that of the Latin Church, analogous to the traditions shared with the corresponding Eastern Christian churches in Eastern and Oriental Orthodoxy. (wikipedia.org)
  • history
  • By giving attention to these writers, we can analyze their viewpoints on Latin American society, history, and culture, comparing their vision as outsiders with that of the official version. (temple.edu)
  • First, the Oxford cleric Galfridus Monemutensis ( Geoffrey of Monmouth ), an Englishman with Welsh and Breton connections, wrote the Latin prose work Historia regum Britanniae (History of the kings of Britain, c. 1135). (encyclopedia.com)
  • study
  • Russia's acquisition of Kiev in the later 17th century introduced the study of Latin to Russia. (wikipedia.org)
  • century
  • This method of Latin grammar instruction was used by teachers well into the 20th century, it still being used in English schools in the 1950s and 1960s. (wikipedia.org)
  • Attempts at reforming Latin use occurred sporadically throughout the period, becoming most successful in the mid-to-late 19th century. (wikipedia.org)
  • Old Latin authored works began in the 3rd century BC. (wikipedia.org)
  • Against this background, speakers will then examine Sino-Latin American diplomacy in the twentieth century. (ucl.ac.uk)