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  • epidermis
  • The larva, after penetrating the epidermis, is unable to enter the blood or lymph streams and instead burrows just below the corium, travelling up to an inch a day. (bmj.com)
  • The larvae penetrate the intact epidermis (e.g., feet, buttocks, or other exposed areas), presumably through the hair follicles or sweat glands, before entering the epidermis where they produce characteristic winding tracks. (egms.de)
  • migration
  • Migration is less irregular and produces broad, less clearly demarcated tracks on the extremities (progressing up to 5 cm per hour, hence the name larva currens) and usually disappears rapidly. (egms.de)
  • canis
  • T. canis larvae were identified in meat that was prepared from chicken taken from the same source as that ingested. (ajtmh.org)
  • Examination of the left eye showed a larva morphologically identical with T canis within the lower peripheral retinal tissues. (jamanetwork.com)
  • worms
  • In either case, the life cycle of the parasite is completed after larvae are released in the intestinal tract and develop into adult male and female worms. (cdc.gov)