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  • slave
  • In the Lesser Antilles they managed to establish a foothold following the colonization of St Kitts in 1624 and Barbados in 1626, and when the Sugar Revolution took off in the mid-seventeenth century, they brought in thousands of Africans to work the fields and mills as slave laborers. (wikipedia.org)
  • 4 ] This "mixing" continued for centuries, also incorporating people brought from sub-Saharan Africa as slave laborers beginning in the early 16th century, and producing what is imagined in Puerto Rico today as a racial-cultural tri-partite society. (councilforresponsiblegenetics.org)
  • colony
  • These Africans flee the colony, however, and make their homes with local Indians. (blackpast.org)
  • The Santo Domingo colony, the only European possession yet in America, had already produced a devastating effect on the Taino, Lucayan (Arawaks), and Kalinga (Caribs) populations. (wikipedia.org)
  • outbreak
  • He was part of a team of reporters at NPR that won a Peabody Award in 2015 for their extensive coverage of the West Africa Ebola outbreak. (wlrn.org)
  • practice
  • One notable group is the Vidal Collection of carved figures known as santos and other folk religious material from the practice of Santeria in Puerto Rico. (si.edu)
  • plantation
  • A plantation is an economic unit producing agricultural commodities (field crops or horticultural products, but not livestock) for sale and employing a relatively large number of unskilled laborers whose activities are closely supervised. (encyclopedia.com)
  • relatively
  • The island nation no bigger than Martha's Vineyard, with a population that could barely fill the Rose Bowl, was defeated with relatively few American casualties. (truth-out.org)
  • 2017
  • The International Monetary Fund suggests that external conditions influencing Latin America have worsened in the period from 2010-2016, but will show growth in 2017. (wikipedia.org)
  • From 1971 until 2017, the Dr. William M. Scholl Center for American History and Culture at the Newberry Library promoted innovative research, teaching, and public programming in the humanities. (newberry.org)
  • time
  • implementations ': ' Since you are very founded seconds, Pages, or identified books, you may be from a American time author. (nooranch.com)
  • During this time, he covered the famines and wars of Africa, as well as the inspiring preachers and Nobel laureates. (wlrn.org)
  • island
  • The annexation process drew controversy: opponents Senator Charles Sumner and Senator Carl Schurz denounced the treaty vehemently, alleging it was made only to enrich private American and island interests and to politically protect Báez. (wikipedia.org)
  • After the Spanish-American War, some Cubans returned to their native land, but many chose to stay in the U.S. due to the physical and economic devastation caused by years of fighting on the island. (wikipedia.org)
  • Jones Act
  • 4. Support the protections and rights for maritime workers codified in the Jones Act and remove all tariffs, fees, taxes, customs, and import fees imposed on Puerto Rico by the Jones Act. (cc-ds.org)
  • Jamaica
  • To complicate matters further, Spain's haphazard grip on its extensive American dominions and its erratic economy acted to impede the broad and systematic spread of plantations similar to those of the French in Saint Domingue or of the British in Jamaica. (wikipedia.org)
  • early
  • In the early decades of the sugarcane-driven migrations, indentured Indians were treated as inhumanely as the enslaved Africans had been. (wikipedia.org)
  • farms
  • Many so-called family farms are larger in area and often in value of product than some plantations, and the larger mechanized wheat and cotton farms of the American West are the equal of plantations in these measures and in capital employed as well. (encyclopedia.com)