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  • muscles
  • Due to their high flexibility, versatility and power-to-weight ratio compared with traditional rigid actuators, artificial muscles have the potential to be a highly disruptive emerging technology. (wikipedia.org)
  • Artificial muscles can be divided into three major groups based on their actuation mechanism. (wikipedia.org)
  • While these EAPs can be made to bend, their low capacities for torque motion currently limit their usefulness as artificial muscles. (wikipedia.org)
  • Artificial muscles constructed from ordinary fishing line and sewing thread can lift 100 times more weight and generate 100 times more power than a human muscle of the same length and weight. (wikipedia.org)
  • One application of thermally-activated artificial muscles is to automatically open and close windows, responding to temperature without using any power. (wikipedia.org)
  • Tiny artificial muscles composed of twisted carbon nanotubes filled with paraffin are 200 times stronger than human muscle. (wikipedia.org)
  • Shape-memory alloys (SMAs), liquid crystalline elastomers, and metallic alloys that can be deformed and then returned to their original shape when exposed to heat, can function as artificial muscles. (wikipedia.org)
  • humans
  • As technology improves, it seems, humans just keep on getting more artificial. (popularmechanics.com)
  • Learn about sex-attractant pheromones in humans and in pigs and about the use of pheromones in the artificial insemination of animals. (britannica.com)
  • The first recorded experiment with artificial insemination in humans occurred in the late 1700s, when Scottish-born surgeon John Hunter impregnated a women with her husband's sperm , resulting in a successful pregnancy . (britannica.com)
  • Today artificial insemination in humans is considered a form of assisted reproductive technology. (britannica.com)
  • The earliest recorded artificial induction of immunity in humans was by variolation or inoculation , which is the controlled infection of a subject with a less lethal natural form of smallpox (known as Variola Minor) to make him or her immune to re-infection with the more lethal natural form, Variola Major. (wikipedia.org)
  • Synthetic
  • Those little black dirt-like granules that fill up the space between synthetic blades of grass and make up some 90 percent of today's artificial turf fields are actually ground-up car and truck tires. (emagazine.com)
  • Artificial Riboswitches: Methods and Protocols focuses on the state-of-the-art methods developed in recent years for creating artificial riboswitches, therefore this volume could be regarded as a collection of recipes for the gene circuit elements in synthetic biology and metabolic engineering. (springer.com)
  • typically
  • Artificial hearts are typically used to bridge the time to heart transplantation , or to permanently replace the heart in case heart transplantation is impossible. (wikipedia.org)
  • The AbioCor is different from previous artificial hearts, which are typically used only to keep a patient alive while he or she is waiting for a human heart to become available for transplant. (wired.com)
  • successfully
  • Examples of wild animals that have been successfully impregnated through artificial insemination include big cats (e.g., the tiger , the puma , the cheetah , and the clouded leopard ), the white rhinoceros ( Ceratotherium simum ), and the onager ( Equus onager ). (britannica.com)
  • approach
  • This approach was refined in the 1930s in Russia , and the subsequent development of methods for the cryopreservation (preservation through freezing) of semen led to the widespread use of artificial insemination in animals. (britannica.com)
  • donor
  • In 1884 American physician William Pancoast performed a modified artificial insemination procedure when he injected sperm from a donor into a woman who was under anesthesia . (britannica.com)
  • make
  • Oh my good Master, this morning walk has been spent to my great pleasure and wonder: but I pray, when shall I have your direction how to make Artificial flyes, like to those that the Trout loves best? (wikipedia.org)
  • Artificial riboswitches and other ligand-responsive gene regulators make it possible to switch protein synthesis ON or OFF with arbitrary ligand molecules. (springer.com)
  • heart
  • For the Jonathan Coulton album, see Artificial Heart (album) . (wikipedia.org)
  • An artificial heart is a device that replaces the heart . (wikipedia.org)
  • An artificial heart is distinct from a ventricular assist device (VAD) designed to support a failing heart. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1949, a precursor to the modern artificial heart pump was built by doctors William Sewell and William Glenn of the Yale School of Medicine using an Erector Set , assorted odds and ends, and dime-store toys. (wikipedia.org)
  • Paul Winchell invented an artificial heart with the assistance of Henry Heimlich (the inventor of the Heimlich maneuver ) and held the first patent for such a device. (wikipedia.org)
  • There is some debate as to how much of Winchell's design Robert Jarvik used in creating Jarvik's artificial heart. (wikipedia.org)
  • In January 1982 surgeons at the University of Utah implanted the first permanent artificial heart into Barney Clark, a 61-year-old dentist from Seattle who was hours from death as he went into the operating room. (scientificamerican.com)
  • Artificial Heart: Death Sentence? (wired.com)
  • But the recipient of this artificial heart is expected to live no more than 60 days, and that will be considered a success. (wired.com)
  • Older versions of artificial hearts work via an external machine that powers the heart. (wired.com)
  • early
  • By the early 19th century, the term artificial fly was being routinely used in angling literature much like this representative quote from Thomas Best's A Concise Treatise on the Art of Angling (1807) to refer to all types of flies used by fly fishers. (wikipedia.org)
  • local
  • But the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) isn't taking sides, leaving it up to state and local jurisdictions to decide whether or not to allow artificial turf. (emagazine.com)
  • When you put your mouse over the figure below, the red lines and/or arrows pointing radially outward denote the local direction of the artifical gravity (and "fake" centrifugal force) that accelerated organisms riding on the ring might measure with a spring balance, and invoke to explain what happens e.g. when they try to jump "up" toward the center of the ring. (umsl.edu)
  • term
  • Artificial muscle is a generic term used for materials or devices that can reversibly contract, expand, or rotate within one component due to an external stimulus (such as voltage, current, pressure or temperature). (wikipedia.org)
  • people
  • Artificial pancreas (AP) systems will automate blood-sugar management, dramatically reducing T1D-related risks and improving lives of people who have the disease. (jdrf.org)
  • Natural
  • While there is no general theory that allows for actuators to be compared, there are "power criteria" for artificial muscle technologies that allow for specification of new actuator technologies in comparison with natural muscular properties. (wikipedia.org)
  • As of 2014, the most powerful artificial muscle fibers in existence can offer a hundredfold increase in power over equivalent lengths of natural muscle fibers. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ro did not begin with attempting to rival or supplant any other language whatever, either natural or artificial, nor was it suggested by any of them. (wikipedia.org)
  • Artificial butter flavoring may contain diacetyl, acetylpropionyl, or acetoin, three natural compounds in butter that contribute to its characteristic flavor. (wikipedia.org)
  • The chief advantage of artificial insemination is that the desirable characteristics of a bull or other male livestock animal can be passed on more quickly and to more progeny than if that animal is mated with females in a natural fashion. (britannica.com)
  • Artificial respiration , breathing induced by some manipulative technique when natural respiration has ceased or is faltering. (britannica.com)
  • artificial respiration, any measure that causes air to flow in and out of a person's lungs when natural breathing is inadequate or ceases, as in respiratory paralysis, drowning, electric shock, choking, gas or smoke inhalation, or poisoning. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Chromosomes, Artificial Artificial chromosomes are laboratory constructs that contain DNA sequences and that perform the critical functions of natural chromosomes. (bookrags.com)
  • contains
  • The 1652 4th edition of John Dennys 's The Secrets of Angling , first published in 1613, contains the first known illustration of an artificial fly. (wikipedia.org)
  • materials
  • Artificial flies are constructed by fly tying , in which furs , feathers , thread or any of very many other materials are tied onto a fish hook . (wikipedia.org)
  • technology
  • That's why JDRF is committed to advancing technology like artificial pancreas systems that can automate blood-sugar management, making life with T1D easier and safer overall. (jdrf.org)
  • development
  • Following the launch of our Artificial Pancreas Project in 2006, our first steps were to support the development of continuous glucose monitors and increasingly sophisticated insulin pumps. (jdrf.org)
  • type
  • An artificial fly or fly lure is a type of fishing lure , usually used in the sport of fly fishing (although they may also be used in other forms of angling). (wikipedia.org)
  • no one type of artificial muscle is the best in all areas. (wikipedia.org)
  • Respiration can be taken over by an artificial lung (especially in respiratory paralysis), a pulmotor, or any other type of mechanical respirator (see resuscitator ). (encyclopedia.com)
  • size
  • Would a large hoop with "one gee" of artificial gravity (e.g. the size of a space station, an L5 space colony, a covenant halo, or Larry Niven's ringworld) require rotation frequencies smaller, or larger, than 0.16 Hertz? (umsl.edu)
  • sugar
  • In recognition of American Diabetes Month, I'd like to share the results of some new research on the role of sugar and artificial sweeteners (sugar substitutes) in diabetes, to bring you up to date. (splenda.com)