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  • potent
  • In contrast, its effect on body weight and cholesterol appears to be more potent than native glucagon. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • Furthermore, whereas native glucagon is a potent insulinogenic stimulus ( 3 ), the analog does not appear to mimic this action. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • Glucagon has a potent effect in isolated fat cells in the laboratory, but appears not to affect fat mobilization in humans in vivo . (blogspot.com)
  • insulin's
  • CONCLUSIONS Together, these data suggest that insulin's inhibitory effect on α-cell glucagon release is in part mediated at the level of the VMH under both normoglycemic and hypoglycemic conditions. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • metabolism
  • The authors conclude that glucagon controls glucose levels, energy, and lipid metabolism, at least in part, via FGF21-dependent pathways. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • However, the role of glucagon in metabolism is frequently misunderstood in diet-health circles. (blogspot.com)
  • The idea goes like this: glucagon is the opposite of insulin, and if they're released together, as they are when you eat a high-protein meal, then their effects on blood sugar , on hunger , and on fat metabolism cancel one another out in a way that they would not following a carbohydrate-heavy meal. (blogspot.com)
  • vitro
  • A combination of in vitro, in situ, molecular biology and clinical studies has formed the basis of our knowledge about the taste receptor proteins in the glucose-sensing enteroendocrine cells and the secretion of incretins by these cells. (cambridge.org)
  • Thus, the data from extensive in vivo studies in human subjects show that low-energy sweeteners do not have any of the adverse effects predicted by in vitro, in situ or knockout studies in animals. (cambridge.org)
  • granules
  • In the mouse, islet contains approximately 7,000 granules per cell in total and the overall cellular density of glucagon granules is 9 granules/µm3. (edu.au)
  • Ligand
  • This may, in part, be due to technical difficulties associated with efficiently blocking the relatively large ligand/receptor-interacting pocket characteristic of the family B GPCRs. (aspetjournals.org)
  • intestinal
  • Low-energy (intense) sweeteners have been used as tools to define the role of intestinal sweet-taste receptors in glucose absorption. (cambridge.org)
  • These studies have given rise to major speculations that the ingestion of food and beverages containing low-energy sweeteners may act via these intestinal mechanisms to increase obesity and the metabolic syndrome due to a loss of equilibrium between taste receptor activation, nutrient assimilation and appetite. (cambridge.org)