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  • hemolytic
  • Certain genetic diseases, such as sickle cell anemia, spherocytosis, thalassemia, pyruvate kinase deficiency, and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency can lead to increased red cell lysis and therefore hemolytic jaundice. (wikipedia.org)
  • Complications
  • As for your question, if the jaundice has been treated early and she has responded to treatment then she should not have future complications. (frihost.com)
  • diseases
  • Jaundice is not a disease but rather a sign that can occur in many different diseases. (slideshare.net)
  • Jaundice may be indicative of a disease such as liver disease, kidney problems or infectious diseases. (vetinfo.com)
  • Vaccinations to prevent against hepatitis , adenovirus or leptospirosis may also prevent jaundice that is caused by these infectious diseases. (vetinfo.com)
  • correlates
  • Kumral A, Ozkan H, Duman N, Yesilirmak DC, Islekel H, Ozalp Y. Breast milk jaundice correlates with high levels of epidermal growth factor. (medscape.com)
  • whites
  • Jaundice is when your skin and the whites of your eyes turn yellow. (www.nhs.uk)
  • Doctors can tell when people have jaundice because the whites of their eyes and even their skin turn yellow. (kidshealth.org)
  • Jaundice can be easily diagnosed judging by the appearance of the mucous membranes and the eye whites. (vetinfo.com)
  • Breastfeeding
  • For reasons that are unclear, breastfeeding increases a baby's risk of developing jaundice, which can often persist for a month or longer. (www.nhs.uk)
  • But in most cases, the benefits of breastfeeding far outweigh any risks associated with jaundice. (www.nhs.uk)
  • For reasons that are unclear, breastfeeding a baby increases the risk of them developing jaundice, which can often persist for a month or longer. (www.nhs.uk)
  • hemoglobin
  • jaundice resulting from increased production of bilirubin from hemoglobin as a result of any process (toxic, genetic, or immune) causing increased destruction of erythrocytes. (drugs.com)