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  • Earth's
  • Degassing of the Earth's mantle through magmatism results in the irreversible loss of helium to space, and high He-3/He-4 ratios observed in oceanic basalts have been considered the main evidence for a 'primordial' undegassed deep mantle reservoir. (columbia.edu)
  • The mining of helium-3, the "solar isotope, on Earth's natural satellite, is the cornerstone of such a concept. (pravdareport.com)
  • Talk about passing gas: Vast stores of helium are escaping from the steam vents and hot springs of Yellowstone National Park after being trapped within Earth's crust for up to 2 billion years, according to new research. (latimes.com)
  • Helium, or more accurately the isotope helium-4, is produced in Earth's crust as uranium and thorium decay. (latimes.com)
  • But in areas where there is little groundwater or movement in Earth's crust, helium-4 can remain trapped and build up over time. (latimes.com)
  • This helium source may have been isolated at the core- higher in Ni than olivines that are expected to crystallize from anymantle boundary region since Earth's accretion4-6. (slideshare.net)
  • minerals
  • Research at the Fusion Technology Institute at the University of Wisconsin has also suggested that the process of mining helium-3 would produce other minerals to support space settlements. (cnn.com)
  • He believes that focusing on mining self-sustaining minerals would be more beneficial than trying to harvest and then transport helium-3. (cnn.com)
  • solar
  • Experts have estimated that the moon is a rich depository of the isotope with possible reserves that stretch meters down into the lunar soil that have been carried there by solar winds. (cnn.com)
  • mantle
  • and 70±10 Kcal/mole, log Do = +2.1±1.2, respectively), but are still too low to transport or homogenize helium in the mantle or even in magma chambers. (mblwhoilibrary.org)
  • tons
  • Suffice it to say, that 100 million tons of lunar soil would have to be processed for the production of one ton of the isotope. (pravdareport.com)
  • In fact, researchers say, the escaping helium -- about 60 tons per year -- is enough to fill one Goodyear blimp every week. (latimes.com)
  • It has been estimated that about 25 tons of helium-3, equal to just one payload of a space shuttle, would provide enough energy for the U.S. for a year at current consumption levels. (cnn.com)
  • produce
  • The standard way to produce helium-3 is to skim it as a byproduct of the radioactive tritium decay. (cuvillier.de)
  • Although techniques are believed to produce ultra-pure helium, until recently no experimental methods have confirmed that the amount of 3 He present in a sample is indeed that small. (isoflex.com)
  • What makes helium-3 so attractive as an alternative future fuel source is its environmentally friendly credentials, as it does not produce radioactive waste. (cnn.com)
  • researchers
  • In a study published Wednesday in the journal Nature, researchers with the U.S. Geological Survey determined that the famed national park was releasing hundreds -- if not thousands -- of times more helium than anticipated. (latimes.com)
  • University of Tokyo researchers discovered an increase in a helium isotope during a ten-year period before the 2014 Mount Ontake eruption in central Japan. (phys.org)
  • loss
  • The corresponding timescales for 50% helium loss or exchange with seawater (1 cm spheres) are about one million years for mid-ocean-ridge- basalts, and about 100,000 years in seamount alkali basalts. (mblwhoilibrary.org)
  • Equations for simultaneous helium production and diffusive loss allow model ages for surface exposure to be corrected for helium loss, and demonstrate that cosmogenic 3He geochronology will not be limited by helium loss for timescales of approximately 1 million years in quartz and 10 million years or more in olivine. (mblwhoilibrary.org)
  • cannot
  • Though the helium itself cannot be dated to determine how long it has been in the ground, they can extrapolate how long it's been there by comparing density levels with other areas. (latimes.com)
  • chemical
  • This article is supported by WikiProject Elements , which gives a central approach to the chemical elements and their isotopes on Wikipedia. (wikipedia.org)
  • Helium is the chemical element with atomic number 2 and an atomic weight of 4.0026, which is represented by the symbol He . (statemaster.com)
  • higher
  • Diffusivities of cosmic- ray produced 3He in surface exposed rocks are several orders of magnitude higher than for inherited helium. (mblwhoilibrary.org)
  • He pointed out that "even under the most favorable circumstances possible the ignition of reaction (of deuterium and helium-3) would require… much higher plasma characteristics than those necessary for triggering the reaction of deuterium and tritium. (pravdareport.com)
  • require
  • Many experiments require ultra-pure helium, with a 3 He component at least another million times smaller, or one in a trillion of the He atoms. (isoflex.com)
  • space
  • of the rare isotope helium-3,' said Nikolai Sevastianov, head of Russian space vehicle manufacturer Energia, at a seminar in Moscow in January. (cnn.com)
  • production
  • It is noteworthy that John Marburger, director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy at the White House, made a special reference to the controversial issue of helium production while delivering a speech at the American Aeronautical Society on March 15, 2006. (pravdareport.com)
  • I'm not talking about the production of helium-3 for the purpose of using it as a fuel for a thermonuclear reactor. (pravdareport.com)
  • addition
  • In addition to inflating balloons and blimps, helium is used in electronics, the car and aerospace industries and healthcare. (latimes.com)
  • energy
  • Helium-3 used as a thermonuclear fuel is alleged to be capable of providing mankind with immense advantages in terms of energy. (pravdareport.com)