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  • excess iron
  • 1996}). Excess iron is deposited in a variety of organs leading to their failure, and resulting in serious illnesses including cirrhosis, hepatomas, diabetes, cardiomyopathy, arthritis, and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. (diseaseinfosearch.org)
  • body
  • The HFE gene makes your body store too much iron. (aafp.org)
  • 1 , 2 Consequently, total body iron levels are precisely regulated under normal physiologic conditions. (aafp.org)
  • The two faulty genes cause your body to absorb more iron than usual from the foods you eat. (nih.gov)
  • treatment
  • The goal of the treatment is to keep a normal level of iron in your blood. (aafp.org)
  • In 1841, the Bohemian doctor and pharmacist Albert Popper published a treatment for Chlorosis containing Vitriolum martis (sulfuric acid and iron) and Sal tartari (potassium carbonate) in Österreichische medicinische Wochenschrift which was republished and refined in the following years. (wikipedia.org)
  • patients
  • 1 Affected patients harbor heterozygous mutations within the iron responsive element (IRE) located in the 5' untranslated region (UTR) of the L-Ferritin gene ( FTL ). (haematologica.org)
  • early
  • An early report was made of a woman who had developed an undifferentiated soft-tissue sarcoma following multiple injections of iron-dextran complex [ref: (inchem.org)
  • years
  • and one was a reticulum-cell sarcoma with fractures of the pelvis possibly only coincidentally related to iron injections six years before. (inchem.org)
  • Only one, a poorly differentiated spindle-cell fibrosarcoma, was believed likely to be related to iron-dextran injections given 14 years previously [ref: (inchem.org)
  • high
  • People who have a very high iron level may have skin with a bronze or gray color. (aafp.org)
  • give
  • It seems probable that the considerable publicity given to the initial case report [ref: and the tendency to give parenteral iron therapy intravenously may have considerably reduced human exposure to intramuscularly administered iron-dextran complex. (inchem.org)
  • heart
  • Too much iron in the heart can cause irregular heartbeats called arrhythmias (ah-RITH-me-ahs) and heart failure . (nih.gov)
  • report
  • In a report on 196 cases of sarcoma of the buttock, four of 90 for whom records on drug use were still available had been given intramuscular injections of iron. (inchem.org)
  • A selective tendency to report receiving iron injections may have introduced bias. (inchem.org)
  • atoms
  • As the iron passes through the Curie temperature there is no change in crystalline structure, but there is a change in "domain structure", where each domain contains iron atoms with a particular electronic spin. (wikipedia.org)
  • In both crystallographic modifications, the basic configuration is a cube with iron atoms located at the corners. (britannica.com)
  • Poisoning
  • Iron poisoning occurs when a person, usually a child, swallows a large number of iron-containing pills, most often vitamins . (webmd.com)
  • Acute iron poisoning mainly involves children under age 6 who swallow pediatric or adult vitamins containing iron. (webmd.com)
  • The amount of iron that will cause poisoning depends upon the size of the child. (webmd.com)
  • If you know, or even suspect, that a child has eaten tablets, you should consult a hospital's emergency department or a poison control center regarding a possible iron poisoning. (webmd.com)
  • Symptoms of iron poisoning usually become evident within 6 hours after an excessive amount of iron is swallowed. (webmd.com)
  • The diagnosis of iron poisoning is usually made by observing your child. (webmd.com)
  • A normal physical exam and no symptoms for 6 hours tells the doctor that the child has experienced either little poisoning or did not eat any iron-containing substances. (webmd.com)
  • Some tests are also too slow to affect the diagnosis and management of iron poisoning. (webmd.com)
  • If your child is diagnosed with iron poisoning, the doctor will first make sure your child is breathing normally. (webmd.com)
  • When a child is suspected to have ingested iron tablets, a serum iron test is ordered to detect and help assess the severity of the poisoning. (labcorp.com)
  • High levels of serum iron can occur as the result of multiple blood transfusions, iron injections into muscle, lead poisoning, liver disease, or kidney disease. (labcorp.com)
  • 1994
  • In 1994, the Iron Pagoda was featured on a two-yuan Chinese postage stamp. (wikipedia.org)
  • Iron Will is a 1994 American adventure film directed by Charles Haid, it stars Mackenzie Astin, Kevin Spacey, David Ogden Stiers, George Gerdes, Brian Cox, Penelope Windust and August Schellenberg. (wikipedia.org)
  • alloys
  • Iron metal has been used since ancient times, although copper alloys, which have lower melting temperatures, were used even earlier in human history. (wikipedia.org)
  • The mechanical properties of iron and its alloys can be evaluated using a variety of tests, including the Brinell test, Rockwell test and the Vickers hardness test. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mostly it appears in iron- carbon alloys such as steels, which contain between 0.003 and about 2 percent carbon (the majority lying in the range of 0.01 to 1.2 percent), and cast irons with 2 to 4 percent carbon. (britannica.com)
  • This versatility of iron-carbon alloys leads to their widespread use in engineering and explains why iron is by far the most important of all the industrial metals. (britannica.com)
  • Sometimes too much charcoal seems to have been used, and iron-carbon alloys, which have lower melting points and can be cast into simple shapes, were made unintentionally. (britannica.com)
  • Bronze Age
  • The Iron Age is the last principal period in the three-age system for classifying ancient societies, preceded by the Bronze Age and the Stone Age . (princeton.edu)
  • At present over 100 large-scale excavations of Iron Age sites have taken place, dating from the 8th century BC to the 1st century AD, and overlapping into the Bronze Age in the 8th century BC. (wikipedia.org)
  • The people of the Iron Age developed the basic economic innovations of the Bronze Age and laid the foundations for feudal organization. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Iron Age Period succeeding the Bronze Age , dating from about 1100 bc in the Near East, later in w Europe . (encyclopedia.com)
  • Ceremonial
  • The use of smelted iron ornaments and ceremonial weapons became common during the period extending from 1900 to 1400 BC About this time, the invention of tempering (see forging ) was made by the Chalybes of the Hittite empire. (encyclopedia.com)
  • slag
  • It is a semi-fused mass of iron with fibrous slag inclusions (up to 2% by weight), which gives it a "grain" resembling wood that is visible when it is etched or bent to the point of failure. (wikipedia.org)
  • This may have weighed up to 5 kilograms (11 pounds) and consisted of almost pure iron with some entrapped slag and pieces of charcoal. (britannica.com)
  • chemical
  • The patient receives a series of IVs containing deferoxamine mesylate ( Desferal ), a chemical that binds to iron in the blood and is then excreted in urine. (webmd.com)
  • Iron is a chemical element with symbol Fe (from Latin: ferrum) and atomic number 26. (wikipedia.org)
  • settlements
  • Rising to a height of almost 5 metres (16 ft) in places, the ramparts completely surround the village of Stanwick St John and form one of the largest Iron Age settlements in Britain, in extent if not necessarily in population. (wikipedia.org)
  • abundant
  • Its abundance in rocky planets like Earth is due to its abundant production by fusion in high-mass stars, where it is the last element to be produced with release of energy before the violent collapse of a supernova, which scatters the iron into space. (wikipedia.org)
  • Iron ore is one of the most abundant elements on Earth, and one of its primary uses is in the production of steel. (britannica.com)
  • supplement
  • If you can, tell the doctor the type of iron supplement and the number of tablets your child swallowed. (webmd.com)
  • excessive
  • demonstrate it to excessive download modelling of iron losses of permanent magnet synchronous by according in one of our variations and foreign strata iniquities! (sftv.org)
  • vitamins
  • Call your doctor, local poison control center, or go directly to the closest hospital's emergency department if you suspect your child has swallowed iron-containing vitamins, even if your child shows no symptoms . (webmd.com)
  • known
  • Fresh iron surfaces appear lustrous silvery-gray, but oxidize in normal air to give hydrated iron oxides, commonly known as rust. (wikipedia.org)
  • The oldest known article of iron shaped by hammering is a dagger found in Egypt that was made before 1350 BC This dagger is believed not to have been made in Egypt but to be of Hittite workmanship. (encyclopedia.com)
  • The Early Iron Age in central Europe, dating from c.800 BC to c.500 BC, is known as the Hallstatt period. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Stanwick Iron Age Fortifications (also known as 'Stanwick Camp'), a huge Iron Age hill fort , sometimes but not always considered an oppidum , comprising over 9 kilometers (5.6 mi) of ditches and ramparts enclosing approximately 300 hectares (700 acres) of land, are situated in Richmondshire , North Yorkshire , England . (wikipedia.org)
  • charcoal
  • In both cases, smelting involved creating a bed of red-hot charcoal to which iron ore mixed with more charcoal was added. (britannica.com)
  • mild steel
  • Sweet iron is a term for cold-rolled "mild steel" or carbon steel that has been work hardened, popular for use in bit mouthpieces used on horses in the western riding disciplines. (wikipedia.org)
  • hemoglobin
  • Serum iron tests are typically ordered as follow-up tests when abnormal results are found on routine tests such as a CBC , with decreased hemoglobin and hematocrit levels. (labcorp.com)
  • widely
  • The Iron Horse term became widely popularized and found frequent use in the century and a half following the competition won by Stephenson's Rocket , in innumerable newspaper articles as well as in various novels. (wikipedia.org)
  • relatively
  • Pure iron is relatively soft, but is unobtainable by smelting because it is significantly hardened and strengthened by impurities, in particular carbon, from the smelting process. (wikipedia.org)
  • Iron (Fe) is a relatively dense metal with a silvery white appearance and distinctive magnetic properties. (britannica.com)
  • Unlike
  • Unlike the metals that form passivating oxide layers, iron oxides occupy more volume than the metal and thus flake off, exposing fresh surfaces for corrosion. (wikipedia.org)
  • chronic
  • In this article, these studies are systematically examined, as are studies of the effects of chronic PPI use on absorption of VB 12 , iron, and magnesium. (springer.com)
  • In chronic diseases, both iron and transferrin or TIBC are typically low. (labcorp.com)
  • suitable
  • Iron is a versatile metal and was suitable for tools and weapons, but it was not until the Viking Age that iron incited a revolution in ploughing. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hoop iron-suitable for the hoops of barrels, made by passing rod iron through rolling dies. (wikipedia.org)
  • Plate iron-sheets suitable for use as boiler plate. (wikipedia.org)
  • mostly
  • Bronze could not be produced in Scandinavia, as tin was not a local natural resource, but with new techniques, iron production from bog iron (mostly in Denmark) slowly gained ground. (wikipedia.org)
  • content
  • And that's what we've found with Iron Mountain, a partner that knew how to protect and preserve our content and help us make it fan friendly. (ironmountain.com)
  • cast iron
  • This cast iron post was placed here by Captain Thomas Lee of the U.S. Army Corps of Topographical Engineers. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cast iron can break if struck with a hammer. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bar iron is a generic term sometimes used to distinguish it from cast iron. (wikipedia.org)
  • The applications of this cast iron were limited because of its brittleness, and in the early Iron Age only the Chinese seem to have exploited it. (britannica.com)
  • Britain
  • The British Iron Age lasted in theory from the first significant use of iron for tools and weapons in Britain to the Romanisation of the southern half of the island. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Romanised culture is termed Roman Britain and is considered to supplant the British Iron Age. (wikipedia.org)
  • often
  • The data on iron is so consistent that it is often used to calibrate measurements or to compare tests. (wikipedia.org)
  • They retain that description because they are made to resemble objects which in the past were wrought (worked) by hand by a blacksmith (although many decorative iron objects, including fences and gates, were often cast rather than wrought). (wikipedia.org)
  • Early iron deficiency often goes unnoticed. (labcorp.com)
  • Serum iron levels are often evaluated in conjunction with other iron tests . (labcorp.com)
  • although
  • The doctor may also ask for an X-ray of your child's abdomen to confirm whether there are iron pills in the gastrointestinal tract, although sometimes the pills can be there and not seen. (webmd.com)
  • Like the other group 8 elements, ruthenium and osmium, iron exists in a wide range of oxidation states, −2 to +7, although +2 and +3 are the most common. (wikipedia.org)
  • During this period people learned to smelt iron , although the Hittites had probably developed the first significant iron industry in Armenia soon after 2000 bc. (encyclopedia.com)
  • sometimes
  • This iron sheeting had a smooth, glossy black surface coating, sometimes greenish-tinged, which did not flake upon bending and made the sheets highly resistant to rusting. (wikipedia.org)
  • form of iron
  • The form of iron that is stable under standard conditions can be subjected to pressures up to ca. 15 GPa before transforming into a high-pressure form, as described in the next section. (wikipedia.org)
  • This form of iron, called delta-ferrite, remains until the melting point is reached. (britannica.com)
  • freezing point
  • As molten iron cools past its freezing point of 1538 °C, it crystallizes into its δ allotrope, which has a body-centered cubic (bcc) crystal structure. (wikipedia.org)
  • Article
  • Included in this article also is a discussion of the mining of iron and of its preparation for smelting. (britannica.com)
  • common
  • The Iron Age is not an archaeological horizon of common artefacts, but is rather a locally diverse cultural phase. (wikipedia.org)
  • agricultural
  • Even though the advent of the Iron Age in Scandinavia was a time of great crisis, the new agricultural expansions, techniques and organizations proceeded apace. (wikipedia.org)