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  • coronary heart d
  • Some investigators have argued that excessive sugar consumption is associated with increased risk of obesity, coronary heart disease, diabetes (T2D), metabolic syndrome, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and stimulation of reward pathways in the brain potentially causing excessive caloric consumption. (chemweb.com)
  • The Framingham risk score (FRS) to predict the 10-year coronary heart disease (CHD) risk was calculated to compare the proportion of MS cases below or above 20%, according to both high and low waist circumference (WC) thresholds. (biomedcentral.com)
  • risks
  • Obesity is a growing concern in the medical field, and providing additional avenues through which to diagnose obesity and address obesity-related health risks can improve prevention efforts and lead to expedited weight management. (jaoa.org)
  • 5 In this article, we describe the tools that have been used historically to diagnose obesity and outline new efforts to redefine important early markers for obesity and obesity-related health risks in patients. (jaoa.org)
  • Researchers
  • Using information on nearly 2,500 men and women enrolled in a study of diet and cancer, researchers from Maastricht University validated ties between a person's clothing size and waist and hip size and their body mass index - a standard measure used to tell how fat or thin a person is. (reuters.com)
  • The study researchers will conduct a physical examination, measure patients height and weight, and draw blood for testing. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Both men and women with the hypertriglyceridemic-waist phenotype had an increased risk of developing heart disease than those who did not have the phenotype, and this increase remained significant after researchers accounted for traditional risk factors. (diabetesincontrol.com)
  • The researchers found that in the 12 years of data studied, the average waist size in the United States grew from 36 inches to 38 inches for women and from 34 inches to 40 inches for men. (clevelandclinic.org)
  • The CDC researchers argue in the new study that their findings of expanding waistlines should prompt doctors to routinely measure their patients' waist circumference "as a key step" in preventing, controlling and managing obesity. (clevelandclinic.org)
  • morbid
  • The ensuing discussion begins by increase in morbidity1 and a decreased life expectancy.2 focusing on issues that the surgeon should carefully consider Morbid obesity-defined as (a) a body weight that exceeds when operating on an extremely overweight patient. (slideshare.net)
  • belly
  • In recent years, physicians have become aware of the increased danger posed by abdominal fat - the fat that accumulates beneath the abdominal wall and gives you a pot belly or makes you apple-shaped . (clevelandclinic.org)
  • liver
  • A group including Peter Libby, chief of the cardiovascular medicine division at Brigham and Women's hospital in Boston and a professor at Harvard Medical School, presented a summary of results of an international study showing links between intra-abdominal fat and liver fat and higher disease risk. (wholehealthcenters.com)
  • weight
  • it is estimated that obesity costs the United States 147 billion dollars a year and the annual medical costs for obese individuals are 1,429 dollars higher than those who have a normal body weight (Center for Disease Control, 2013). (ceufast.com)
  • BMI should not, however, be used in isolation as a measure of unhealthy weight. (bpac.org.nz)
  • Body weight was measured to within 1 kg, body length to within 1 cm, hip circumference at the iliac crests to within 1 cm, and waist circumference at the umbilicus to within 1 cm. (bmj.com)
  • For the 82 cases with body mass index between 20 and 30 r was 0.81 for body weight, 0.80 for body mass index, and 0.91 for hip circumference. (bmj.com)
  • Body mass index (BMI) was calculated from body length (BL) and weight, and waist circumference (WC) and ilium wing distance (IWD) were measured. (vin.com)
  • The following BMI categorization-18.5-24.9 kg/m 2 = normal weight, 25-29.9 kg/m 2 = overweight, and ≥30 kg/m 2 = obese-has virtually become the "gold standard" for evaluation and management of obesity. (wiley.com)
  • For a given amount of weight loss, according to ICCR, exercise burns more intra-abdominal fat than cutting calories, while preserving lean body mass. (wholehealthcenters.com)
  • This makes it possible to reduce intra-abdominal fat without necessarily losing weight. (wholehealthcenters.com)