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  • person's
  • disabled family coping a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as the behavior of a significant person (family member or other primary person) who disables his or her own capacities and the client's capacities to address tasks effectively that are essential to either person's adaptation to the health challenge. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The significant person's coping response is disabling if it involves short-term behaviors that are highly detrimental to the welfare of either the client or the significant person. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Chronically disabling patterns by a primary person are described as continued use of selected coping skills that have interrupted the person's longer-term capacity to receive, store, or organize information or to react to it. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Direct effects are those that reflect the person's motivated attempts to cope with perceived threats and pressures. (kelmacmedical.us)
  • threats
  • defensive coping a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as the state in which an individual has a repeated projection of falsely positive self-evaluation based on a self-protective pattern that defends against underlying perceived threats to positive self-regard. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • patients
  • It is for these patients that multidisciplinary management strategies have been developed. (lww.com)
  • Taheri Otaghsara S T, Khaleghdoost Mohammadi T, Hasavari F, Kazem Nezhad Leyli E. Comparing Coping Styles Between Patients With Cancer and Healthy People. (ac.ir)
  • Objective: This paper aims to compare the coping styles of cancer patients referring to a medical educational and healthy individuals in Rasht City. (ac.ir)
  • He concluded that subtype differences may account for the inconsistencies among CFS patients grouped into one category, and that subtyping may well lead to more appropriate treatment strategies. (phoenixrising.me)
  • clinicians
  • Through deeper understanding of the anxieties, negotiations and compromises experienced by caregivers of children with FH when they are eating out, clinicians and support charities can tailor their support to meet the needs of caregivers and children. (biomedcentral.com)
  • disease
  • In February, 2015 the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences released a report on the illness suggesting that the name be changed to Systemic Exertional Intolerance Disease (SEID). (massmecfs.org)
  • Food intolerances generally have a delayed reaction, and rarely have immediate clinically severe consequences, although they can cause severe chronic disease such as malnutrition. (biomedcentral.com)
  • suggests
  • 9 Research on perceived discrimination and health also suggests that the generic perception of unfair treatment tends to be adversely related to health, regardless of whether the discriminatory behaviour is attributed to race or other factors. (scielo.org.za)
  • Current evidence suggests that transition has led to economic and social dislocation, creating an environment that allows illicit drug markets, drug injecting, and related HIV risk to thrive. (bmj.com)
  • health
  • 4 Empirical research has examined the association between perceived discrimination and health. (scielo.org.za)
  • compromised family coping a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as a situation in which a usually supportive primary person (family member or close friend) is providing insufficient, ineffective, or compromised support, comfort, assistance, or encouragement that may be needed by the client to manage or master adaptive tasks related to his/her health challenge. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • 1- Social Determinants of Health Research Center (SDHRC), Nursing (MSc. (ac.ir)
  • 1 2 The spread of HIV is shaped by variations in population behaviour and public health response, which are themselves shaped by differences in social, cultural, economic, and political condition. (bmj.com)
  • cohesion
  • L. J. Hanifan 's 1916 article regarding local support for rural schools is one of the first occurrences of the term social capital in reference to social cohesion and personal investment in the community. (wikipedia.org)
  • thinkers exploring the relation between associational life and democracy were using similar concepts regularly by the 19th century, drawing on the work of earlier writers such as James Madison ( The Federalist Papers ) and Alexis de Tocqueville ( Democracy in America ) to integrate concepts of social cohesion and connectedness into the pluralist tradition in American political science. (wikipedia.org)
  • arise
  • Hübl works alongside a team of trained therapists and facilitators, there to support an energetic initiation, so that safety and coherence arise at the beginning of the group session. (kosmosjournal.org)
  • Ears
  • Tinnitus, or chronic ringing or buzzing in the ears, and hyperacusis, a potentially disabling intolerance of moderate to loud sounds, occur commonly in the adult population. (lww.com)
  • Empirical
  • 1 Yet empirical evidence is lacking on the role of social and political transition in creating the HIV risk environment. (bmj.com)
  • prevention strategies
  • The experience of participants who maintain behaviour change highlights the challenges for the wider implementation of diabetes prevention strategies. (springer.com)
  • Prevention strategies aimed at individual behaviour may therefore only partially reduce the risk of transmission. (bmj.com)
  • include
  • Efforts to encourage behaviour change maintenance should take account of context and the way this changes over time, and should include strategies to address these issues. (springer.com)
  • We use the term food hypersensitivity to include both food allergy and food intolerance. (biomedcentral.com)
  • skills
  • The best strategy is for a patient to accept the fact of the illness and to develop coping skills that will make the situation as tolerable as possible. (massmecfs.org)
  • individual
  • Participants (aged 10-18 years) were randomized to either 10 weeks of individual CBT (n = 20) or supported wait-list (n = 20). (springer.com)
  • See also ineffective individual coping . (thefreedictionary.com)
  • ineffective individual coping a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as the inability to form a valid appraisal of the stressors, inadequate choices of practical responses, and/or inability to use available resources. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • responses
  • Rapid change may contribute to weakening of civil society and fragmentation of community responses in the face of social dislocation. (bmj.com)
  • found
  • When found, these are addressed by vetting through a multi-level review process, and through requirements for references to be provided to support the content. (uptodate.com)
  • environments
  • 3 We also need strategies to create the local environments and social structural conditions supportive of risk reduction by individuals and communities. (bmj.com)
  • groups
  • Social capital has been used to explain the improved performance of diverse groups, the growth of entrepreneurial firms, superior managerial performance, enhanced supply chain relations, the value derived from strategic alliances, and the evolution of communities. (wikipedia.org)
  • Discrimination includes actions (subtle or overt, direct or indirect) that limit the social, political or economic opportunities of particular groups 1 and may have short- and long-term consequences. (scielo.org.za)
  • Medical
  • Medical and social services in the community may be needed when the patient leaves hospital. (bmj.com)
  • important
  • Perceived discrimination constitutes an important stressor that should be taken into account in the aetiology of psychiatric disorders. (scielo.org.za)
  • life
  • In the first half of the 19th century, Alexis de Tocqueville had observations about American life that seemed to outline and define social capital. (wikipedia.org)
  • Coping with life challenges. (ac.ir)
  • work
  • EI often leads to lifestyle alterations (e.g. not taking part of activities formerly engaged in) and functional impairment (e.g. not being able to work, social deprivation). (diva-portal.org)
  • risk
  • We suggest the concept of risk environment as a way of analysing the effect of large scale and abrupt social, economic, and political change in eastern Europe and the western Balkans on the spread of HIV and show how it can be used to plan a response. (bmj.com)
  • themselves
  • When strangers come together in a meeting place, some may arrive wearing social masks, protecting themselves from expectations and judgments, or presenting an image of themselves as how they want to be perceived. (kosmosjournal.org)
  • Those who have no conscience at all are a group unto themselves, whether they be homicidal tyrants or merely ruthless social snipers. (bibliotecapleyades.net)