Loading...
  • humans
  • However, adiponectin production and release in obese humans and animals are thought to be downregulated by feedback inhibition by as-yet-unidentified serum humoral components, resulting in decreased serum adiponectin, with insulin or tumor necrosis factor-α playing a possible role in this mechanism ( 9 ). (diabetesjournals.org)
  • hormone
  • Secondary diabetes is carbohydrate intolerance secondary to pancreatic disease, excess production of certain hormones (eg, growth hormone), use of certain drugs (eg, corticosteroids), insulin receptor abnormalities, and certain genetic disorders. (health.am)
  • Adiponectin, a hormone almost exclusively secreted by adipocytes, participates in several anti-inflammatory and insulin-sensitizing processes ( 1 ). (diabetesjournals.org)
  • levels
  • This insulin release further decreases insulin receptors due to elevated hormonal levels, and thus a vicious cycle begins of excessive appetite with weight gain. (health.am)
  • receptor
  • Ambient insulin levels, various physiologic and disease states, and drugs regulate insulin receptor concentration or affinity. (medscape.com)
  • L. J. Hale and R. J. Coward, "The insulin receptor and the kidney," Current Opinion in Nephrology and Hypertension , vol. 22, pp. 100-106, 2013. (hindawi.com)
  • Par14 protein associates with insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1), thereby enhancing insulin-induced IRS-1," The Journal of Biological Chemistry , vol. 288, no. 28, pp. 20692-20701, 2013. (hindawi.com)
  • Role of the insulin receptor substrate 1 and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling pathway in insulin-induced expression of sterol regulatory element binding protein 1c and glucokinase genes in rat hepatocytes," Diabetes , vol. 51, no. 6, pp. 1672-1680, 2002. (hindawi.com)
  • J. Landis and L. M. Shaw, "Insulin receptor substrate 2-mediated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling selectively inhibits glycogen synthase kinase 3 β to regulate aerobic glycolysis," The Journal of Biological Chemistry , vol. 289, no. 26, pp. 18603-18613, 2014. (hindawi.com)
  • When insulin binds to its receptors on the surface of a cell, the hormone receptor complex undergoes endocytosis and is subsequently attacked by intracellular lysosomal enzymes. (wikipedia.org)
  • At high plasma concentrations, the number of surface receptors for insulin is gradually reduced by the accelerated rate of receptor internalization and degradation brought about by increased hormonal binding. (wikipedia.org)
  • This process is illustrated by the insulin receptor sites on target cells in a person with type 2 diabetes. (wikipedia.org)
  • mutations
  • The scientists then looked at gene activation in insulin signaling pathways for iPSCs and fibroblasts with IR mutations, and for corresponding cells derived from people without those mutations. (harvard.edu)
  • reduces
  • Therefore, we suppose that the lemon detox program reduces body fat and insulin resistance through caloric restriction and might have a potential beneficial effect on risk factors for cardiovascular disease related to circulating hs-CRP reduction without hematological changes. (nih.gov)
  • The study demonstrated that insulin resistance also reduces the ability of the iPSCs to grow and proliferate. (harvard.edu)
  • Clinical data from humans and animals reveals honey supplementation reduces or improves insulin resistance, according to the "IJBS" review. (livestrong.com)
  • role of insulin
  • The role of insulin as a boost to the immune system to improve its ability to fight infection has been detailed for the first time by Toronto General Hospital Research Institute scientists. (news-medical.net)
  • action of insulin
  • Regulation of endothelial constitutive nitric oxide synthase gene expression in endothelial cells and in vivo: a specific vascular action of insulin," Circulation , vol. 101, no. 6, pp. 676-681, 2000. (hindawi.com)
  • Fat cells also secrete adiponectin which acts in an opposite way to RBP4 by improving the action of insulin, however, engorged fat cells secrete it in lower amount than normal fat cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • injections
  • If the injections have been done repeatedly in the same area, the tissue can toughen and cause the insulin to pool, rather than be absorbed. (vetinfo.com)
  • Pet owners should be able to make a commitment in terms of both time and money to administer insulin injections. (vetinfo.com)
  • To achieve this goal, individuals with an absolute deficiency of insulin require insulin replacement therapy, which is given through injections or an insulin pump. (wikipedia.org)
  • secretion
  • It is now used as a synonym for dominantly inherited, monogenic defects of insulin secretion occurring at any age, and no longer includes any forms of type 2 diabetes. (wikipedia.org)
  • ineffective
  • A medication history should be taken to rule out any drugs the dog may have taken as the cause of the ineffective insulin. (vetinfo.com)
  • Just because your diabetic dog's insulin may have become ineffective, doesn't automatically mean he has developed insulin resistance. (vetinfo.com)
  • There are several reasons why the insulin may have become ineffective. (vetinfo.com)
  • In some forms of MODY, standard treatment is appropriate, though exceptions occur: In MODY2, oral agents are relatively ineffective and insulin is unnecessary. (wikipedia.org)
  • diabetic
  • If your diabetic dog suddenly requires a substantially higher dose of insulin to keep his blood sugars in line, it's important to consult your veterinarian. (vetinfo.com)
  • high blood
  • If the pancreas is not able to produce enough amount of insulin and/or if the cells do not respond normally to the insulin, you will have high blood sugar as a result of your body's inability to move glucose from the blood into muscle and fat cells and because your liver produces too much glucose that it releases into the blood. (alexpage.ru)
  • cells
  • The experimental elimination of senescent cells from transgenic progeroid mice and non-progeroid, naturally-aged mice led to greater resistance against aging-associated diseases. (wikipedia.org)