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  • sequences
  • These 100-200bp sequences facilitate replication activity during S phase. (wikipedia.org)
  • Animal cells contain a much more cryptic version of an ARS, with no conserved sequences found as of yet. (wikipedia.org)
  • DNA replication is initiated from specific sequences called origins of replication, and eukaryotic cells have multiple replication origins. (wikipedia.org)
  • In this organism, replication origins are specified by the autonomous replication sequences (ARS), which are around 100 base pairs and contain a shared 11-base-pair autonomous consensus sequence (ACS). (biomedcentral.com)
  • It is therefore possible that potential origin sequences are distributed at relatively short intervals throughout chromosomes and are regulated to adjust their use in different biological situations. (embopress.org)
  • When a few of these sequences are deleted, DNA is still copied from other intact origins, but when many are deleted, chromosome replication slows down dramatically. (wikipedia.org)
  • The lamins are type V intermediate filaments which can be categorized as either A-type (lamin A, C) or B-type(lamin B1, B2) according to homology of their DNA sequences, biochemical properties and cellular localization during the cell cycle. (wikipedia.org)
  • It has been shown that lamin polypeptides have an affinity for binding chromatin through their α-helical (rod like) domains at specific DNA sequences called matrix attachment regions (MAR). A MAR has a length of approximately 300-1000 bp and has a high A/T content. (wikipedia.org)
  • Transition
  • Using clb1,2,3,4 cells rescued by conditional overproduction of CLB1, it has been shown that the CLB genes perform an essential role at the G2/M-phase transition, and also a role in S phase. (sdbonline.org)
  • This transition involves the ordered assembly of additional replication factors to unwind the DNA and accumulate the multiple eukaryotic DNA polymerases around the unwound DNA. (wikipedia.org)
  • The transition from the inefficient replication that takes place in differentiated erythrocyte nuclei in Xenopus egg extracts to efficient replication more typical of early development is dependent on the re‐programming of replicon organization during mitosis and results in shorter interorigin distances ( Lemaitre et al , 2005 ). (embopress.org)
  • The G1/S transition is a stage in the cell cycle at the boundary between the G1 phase, in which the cell grows, and the S phase, during which DNA is replicated. (wikipedia.org)
  • During this transition the cell makes decisions to become quiescent (enter G0), differentiate, make DNA repairs, or proliferate based on environmental cues and molecular signaling inputs. (wikipedia.org)
  • The G1/S transition is highly regulated by transcription factor p53 in order to halt the cell cycle when DNA is damaged. (wikipedia.org)
  • If a cell passes through the G1/S transition the cell will continue through the cell cycle regardless of incoming mitogenic factors due to the positive feed-back loop of G1-S transcription. (wikipedia.org)
  • Chk1 impacts various stages of the cell cycle including the S phase, G2/M transition and M phase. (wikipedia.org)
  • The concentration of Dbf4 at the G1/S transition of the cell cycle is higher than the concentration at the M/G1 transition. (wikipedia.org)
  • organism
  • Repetition of the cell cycle may produce a clone of identical cells, such as a colony of baker's yeast on a petri dish, or it may be accompanied by intricate changes that led to differentiation into distinctive cell types, or ultimately to the development of a complex organism. (biologyreference.com)
  • The cell-division cycle is a vital process by which a single-celled fertilized egg develops into a mature organism, as well as the process by which hair, skin, blood cells, and some internal organs are renewed. (wikibooks.org)
  • This organism profits from the intrinsic asymmetry of the DNA replication process to mark one of the two sister chromatids at the mating-type locus ( mat1 ) by a single-strand DNA modification. (asm.org)
  • This single cell then develops via embryogenesis into an entire organism consisting of hundreds of different cell types. (plantcell.org)
  • mutations
  • If the heterochromatin is lost (due to mutations in the cell), the repetitive DNA becomes vulnerable to rearrangements and recombination. (phys.org)
  • Analysis of null mutations suggests that the CLB genes exhibit some degree of redundancy, but clb1,2 and clb2,3 cells are inviable. (sdbonline.org)
  • This is important, because otherwise the damaged DNA would be copied and mutations would be transmitted to daughter cells. (asmscience.org)
  • To become a cancer cell, a normal cell must accumulate mutations in several different genes. (asmscience.org)
  • Single base-pair mutations in the ACS can abolish initiation activity. (wikipedia.org)
  • Studies in Drosophila showed that recessive lethal mutations in multiple drosophila ORC subunits reduces the amount of BrdU (a marker of active replication), incorporated. (wikipedia.org)
  • inhibits
  • Cells were also released into media containing 15 μg/ml of nocodazole to activate the SAC ( Figure 1, B and D ). Pds1 was stabilized by SAC activation (compare Figure 1, A and B ), since nocodazole treatment inhibits both APC Cdc20 and APC Cdh1 . (genetics.org)
  • Inhibits CDC5 activity during mitosis through direct binding to its PBD. (rcsb.org)