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  • macrophage migrat
  • Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF or MMIF), also known as glycosylation-inhibiting factor (GIF), L-dopachrome isomerase, or phenylpyruvate tautomerase is a protein that in humans is encoded by the MIF gene. (wikipedia.org)
  • Macrophage migration inhibitory factor assembles into a trimer composed of three identical subunits. (wikipedia.org)
  • Macrophage migration inhibitory factor is also a potential drug target for sepsis, rheumatoid arthritis, and cancer. (wikipedia.org)
  • Macrophage migration inhibitory factor domain is an evolutionary conserved protein domain. (wikipedia.org)
  • Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a key regulatory cytokine within innate and adaptive immune responses, capable of promoting and modulating the magnitude of the response. (wikipedia.org)
  • inhibition
  • The purpose of this chapter is to use a few of the known examples of how inhibition and inhibitory plasticity subserve the functional processing of sounds to illustrate both the advances that have been made in terms of understanding mechanisms as well as the open questions remaining. (springer.com)
  • While the cellular mechanisms underlying inhibitory plasticity are less clear in these latter cases, taken all together these examples demonstrate the importance and pervasiveness of inhibition in the functional processing of sounds. (springer.com)
  • The most typical and well known inhibitory action in the cortical microcircuit is a strong inhibition on the target neuron by axo-somatic synapses. (nih.gov)
  • Inhibitory control, also known as response inhibition, is a cognitive process that permits an individual to inhibit their impulses and natural, habitual, or dominant behavioral responses to stimuli (a.k.a. prepotent responses) in order to select a more appropriate behavior that is consistent with completing their goals. (wikipedia.org)
  • Gastric
  • Gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP), also known as glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide, is a member of the incretin family of hormones. (clontech.com)
  • Gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) or gastroinhibitory peptide, also known as the glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide, is an inhibiting hormone of the secretin family of hormones. (wikipedia.org)
  • It has traditionally been named gastrointestinal inhibitory peptide or gastric inhibitory peptide and was found to decrease the secretion of stomach acid to protect the small intestine from acid damage, reduce the rate at which food is transferred through the stomach, and inhibit the GI motility and secretion of acid. (wikipedia.org)
  • Gastric inhibitory polypeptide at the US National Library of Medicine Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) King MW (16 November 2006). (wikipedia.org)
  • The gastric inhibitory polypeptide receptor (GIP-R) also known as the glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide receptor is a protein that in humans is encoded by the GIPR gene. (wikipedia.org)
  • Gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP), also called glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide, is a 42-amino acid polypeptide synthesized by K cells of the duodenum and small intestine. (wikipedia.org)
  • Protein
  • The CFTR inhibitory factor (Cif) is a protein virulence factor secreted by the Gram-negative bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter nosocomialis. (wikipedia.org)
  • This effect was later found to be the result of a single secreted protein produced by P. aeruginosa, which was named the CFTR inhibitory factor for this initial phenotype. (wikipedia.org)
  • synapse
  • Total number of analyzed boutons are shown at the right of each bar chart (N). Most spines receiving an inhibitory synapse are dually innervated spines. (nih.gov)
  • circuitry
  • This provides one of the most detailed auditory examples of the function of inhibitory synaptic input, how inhibitory circuitry is modified by activity during development, and what potential cellular mechanisms are critical for this plasticity. (springer.com)
  • Investigating the mouse olfactory bulb, where ongoing neurogenesis continually supplies new inhibitory granule cells into existing circuitry, we isolated the development of sensory maps formed by inhibitory networks. (nih.gov)
  • Vitro
  • Misako Sakai-Kashiwabara and Kazuhito Asano, "Inhibitory Action of Quercetin on Eosinophil Activation In Vitro ," Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine , vol. 2013, Article ID 127105, 7 pages, 2013. (hindawi.com)
  • human
  • Inhibitory control and executive function are important skills for academic success and positive health outcomes and well-being later in life," said study co-author, Atika Khurana, a professor in the Department of Counseling Psychology and Human Services and scientist at the UO's Prevention Science Institute. (eurekalert.org)
  • Inhibitory mechanism of the CXCR4 antagonist T22 against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection. (mendeley.com)
  • improves
  • Galindo-Leon EE, Lin FG, Liu RC (2009) Inhibitory plasticity in a lateral band improves cortical detection of natural vocalizations. (springer.com)
  • consensus sequence
  • The term Kinase tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (KTIM) was coined by a group of immunology researchers from McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada in 2008 to represent any immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory-like sequence motif, with the consensus sequence I/V/L/SxYxxL/V, found in a kinase and regulating its activity. (wikipedia.org)
  • cortical
  • Firstly, at least ten or more inhibitory non-pyramidal cell subtypes engage in diverse inhibitory functions to produce the elaborate activity characteristic of the different cortical states. (nih.gov)
  • Diagram of cortical microcircuit showing the major subtypes of GABAergic inhibitory interneurons and their synaptic diversity. (nih.gov)
  • immune system
  • Furthermore, glucocorticoids also stimulate white blood cells to release MIF and hence MIF partially counteracts the inhibitory effects that glucocorticoids have on the immune system. (wikipedia.org)
  • known
  • The prefrontal cortex, caudate nucleus, and subthalamic nucleus are known to be involved in inhibitory control cognition. (wikipedia.org)
  • behaviors
  • An inhibitory control test is a neuropsychological test that measures an individual's ability to override their natural, habitual, or dominant behavioral response to a stimulus in order to implement more adaptive goal-oriented behaviors. (wikipedia.org)
  • Females tend to have a greater basal capacity to exert inhibitory control over undesired or habitual behaviors and respond differently to modulatory environmental contextual factors relative to males. (wikipedia.org)
  • effects
  • The study's design allowed researchers to focus on the effects of bilingual experience on inhibitory-control development during preschool years. (eurekalert.org)
  • Previous studies have examined the effects of bilingualism on inhibitory control, but have done so with a focus on one point in time or development and have focused on smaller samples from mostly middle class backgrounds, said Santill├ín, who now is a senior research manager at Harvard University's Center on the Developing Child. (eurekalert.org)
  • researchers
  • Researchers looked at a national sample of 1,146 Head Start children who were assessed for their inhibitory control at age 4, and then followed over an 18-month period. (eurekalert.org)
  • Researchers also were able to control for other variables that could be associated with inhibitory control development, such as a child's age and parenting practices. (eurekalert.org)
  • The longitudinal approach allowed researchers to see how inhibitory control changed over time for children who were developing bilingualism during the same time period, as well as for those who were already bilingual with those who remained monolingual. (eurekalert.org)
  • According to researchers, new treatments aimed at strengthening inhibitory control could help Cocaine abusers prevent cravings and therefore relapse. (medindia.net)
  • tend
  • It was important, she said, to focus on a sample of children who tend to be at risk for not developing inhibitory abilities at the same rate as their peers from higher socioeconomic backgrounds because of the motivation to find factors that could help buffer such children from these negative outcomes. (eurekalert.org)
  • found
  • The results of this study found that the inhibitory control test was the most effective in allowing the child to remember things. (wikipedia.org)
  • development
  • Over the follow-up period, both the bilingual group and the monolingual-to-bilingual transition group showed more rapid inhibitory control development than the group of English-only speakers. (eurekalert.org)
  • This study shows one way in which environmental influences can impact the development of inhibitory control during younger years. (eurekalert.org)
  • This allowed us to get closer to capturing the dynamic nature of the development of bilingualism and inhibitory control, both of which change over time, and rule out other potential explanations for the differences observed between groups," she said. (eurekalert.org)
  • signal
  • Some of the neuropsychological tests that measure inhibitory control include the Stroop task, go/no-go task, Simon task, Flanker task, antisaccade tasks, delay of gratification tasks, and stop-signal tasks. (wikipedia.org)
  • test
  • At the beginning of the study, the group that entered as already bilingual scored higher on a test of inhibitory control compared to the other two groups," said the study's lead author Jimena Santill├ín, a UO doctoral student in psychology at the time of the study. (eurekalert.org)
  • Three of these tests were working memory tasks and one was an inhibitory/cognitive control test. (wikipedia.org)
  • The last test consisted of a three peg task, this measured inhibitory control, in this test children were asked to identify pegs. (wikipedia.org)