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  • donor
  • Application of the principles of cytokine signaling to the clinical setting may necessitate new trial design structures that take into consideration donor and host characteristics as well as the kinetics of GVHD development. (springer.com)
  • Graft-versus-host-disease-associated lymphoid hypoplasia and B cell dysfunction is dependent upon donor T cell-mediated Fas-ligand function, but not perforin function. (springer.com)
  • Depletion of host hepatic and splenic macrophages and DCs significantly inhibited the proliferation of donor C3H.SW CD8 + T cells in the spleen, but not in the PLN or MLN, of B6 mice. (jimmunol.org)
  • In a mouse model of miHA-initiated acute GVHD, we recently found that host APC activation of donor T cells is sufficient to initiate both the activation and effector phases of T cell-mediated acute GVHD ( 6 , 7 ). (jimmunol.org)
  • Cadaveric kidney donation beyond the age of 60 years - a comparative analysis of 1180 grafts from different donor age groups. (booktopia.com.au)
  • Its incidence and severity depends on several factors, such as prophylaxis method, donor/recipient matching, intensity of the condition- ing regimen and composition of the graft. (slideshare.net)
  • Keywords: graft-versus-host disease, haemopoietic stem cell transplantation, donor lymphocyte infusion, immunosuppres- sive therapy, mesenchymal stem cells. (slideshare.net)
  • GvHD is thought to be caused by donor T cells reacting against host allo-antigens: this may well be the case, but the mechanism underlying such immune reaction are quite complex (Teshima & Ferrara, 2002a). (slideshare.net)
  • Therefore host APC participate in activating donor T cells to kill host cells and the age of host APC seems relevant (in keeping with the notion that older patients have more GvHD) (Ordemann et al, 2002). (slideshare.net)
  • TK is currently being investigated in patients suffering from acute leukemia in first or subsequent complete remission and at high risk of relapse or in patients with relapsed disease who are candidates for haploidentical transplantation of hemopoietic stem cells (taken from a partially HLA-compatible family donor). (wikipedia.org)
  • The presence of TK allows for retention of immune protection and anti-leukaemic effects of donor T lymphocytes and at the same time to control and annul possible harmful reactions between these lymphocytes and healthy tissues of the patient, reaction known as graft-versus-host disease (GvDH). (wikipedia.org)
  • For these types of grafts, extraction of the part of the periosteum and accompanying blood vessels along with donor bone is required. (wikipedia.org)
  • Alloimmunity is caused by the difference between products of highly polymorphic genes, primarily genes of the major histocompatibility complex, of the donor and graft recipient. (wikipedia.org)
  • A failure of cross-matching can allow donor blood of an incompatible blood group to be transfused, resulting in a transfusion reaction. (wikipedia.org)
  • bone
  • Perforin/granzyme-dependent and independent mechanisms are both important for the development of graft-versus-host disease after murine bone marrow transplantation. (springer.com)
  • Early kidney transplantation may prevent aluminium-related bone disease. (booktopia.com.au)
  • Numerous reports have described therapeutic benefits in various disease models after administration of the adult stem/progenitor cells from bone marrow or other tissues referred to as mesenchymal stem cells/multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs). (hindawi.com)
  • In this study, we investigated the feasibility and safety of intravenous transplantation of allogeneic bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for femoral head repair, and observed the migration and distribution of MSCs in hosts. (medsci.org)
  • aGvHD occurs, in large part, because the T cells in the bone marrow graft do not "accept" the presence of the transplant recipient's cells. (knowcancer.com)
  • Bone grafting is a surgical procedure that replaces missing bone in order to repair bone fractures that are extremely complex, pose a significant health risk to the patient, or fail to heal properly. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bone grafts may be autologous (bone harvested from the patient's own body, often from the iliac crest), allograft (cadaveric bone usually obtained from a bone bank), or synthetic (often made of hydroxyapatite or other naturally occurring and biocompatible substances) with similar mechanical properties to bone. (wikipedia.org)
  • Most bone grafts are expected to be reabsorbed and replaced as the natural bone heals over a few months' time. (wikipedia.org)
  • The principles involved in successful bone grafts include osteoconduction (guiding the reparative growth of the natural bone), osteoinduction (encouraging undifferentiated cells to become active osteoblasts), and osteogenesis (living bone cells in the graft material contribute to bone remodeling). (wikipedia.org)
  • As native bone grows, it will generally replace the graft material completely, resulting in a fully integrated region of new bone. (wikipedia.org)
  • The biologic mechanisms that provide a rationale for bone grafting are osteoconduction, osteoinduction and osteogenesis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Osteoconduction occurs when the bone graft material serves as a scaffold for new bone growth that is perpetuated by the native bone. (wikipedia.org)
  • Osteoblasts from the margin of the defect that is being grafted utilize the bone graft material as a framework upon which to spread and generate new bone. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the very least, a bone graft material should be osteoconductive. (wikipedia.org)
  • A bone graft material that is osteoconductive and osteoinductive will not only serve as a scaffold for currently existing osteoblasts but will also trigger the formation of new osteoblasts, theoretically promoting faster integration of the graft. (wikipedia.org)
  • Osteogenesis occurs when vital osteoblasts originating from the bone graft material contribute to new bone growth along with bone growth generated via the other two mechanisms. (wikipedia.org)
  • Depending on where the bone graft is needed, a different doctor may be requested to do the surgery. (wikipedia.org)
  • Doctors that do bone graft procedures are commonly orthopedic surgeons, otolaryngology head and neck surgeon, neurosurgeons, craniofacial surgeons, oral and maxillofacial surgeons, podiatric surgeons and periodontists, dental surgeons, oral surgeons and implantologists. (wikipedia.org)
  • Autologous (or autogenous) bone grafting involves utilizing bone obtained from the same individual receiving the graft. (wikipedia.org)
  • this is particularly true for block grafts, in which a small block of bone is placed whole in the area being grafted. (wikipedia.org)
  • This kind of graft is known as a vital bone graft. (wikipedia.org)
  • Kv1.3 is also considered a therapeutic target for the treatment of obesity, for enhancing peripheral insulin sensitivity in patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus, and for preventing bone resorption in periodontal disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • Lymphoma
  • Effect of HLA incompatibility on graft-versus-host disease, relapse, and survival after marrow transplantation for patients with leukemia or lymphoma. (springer.com)
  • To progres studies in Oncodermatology , he is building strong links with the Westmead Cancer Care Centre and the Skin and Cancer Foundation Australia, opened the first Cutaneous Lymphoma Clinic and cutaneous Graft versus Host Disease Clinics in NSW, and he is participating in melanoma, cutaneous lymphoma, basal cell carcinoma, non-melanoma skin cancer, and actinic keratosis clinical trials. (edu.au)
  • It is not known if therapy with gusperimus may increase the risk of malignant diseases (lymphoma, leukemia, solid tumors), as is the case with other highly potent immunosuppressant agents such as ciclosporin or tacrolimus. (wikipedia.org)
  • mortality
  • Partially HLA-mismatched related (HLA-haploidentical) donors can be identified for the vast majority of patients, but transplants from these donors have historically been limited by excessive graft -versus- host disease, nonrelapse mortality, and poor overall survival. (springer.com)
  • Thus, it is perhaps not surprising that approximately 45% of the mortality in Western nations is attributed to fibrotic diseases, a figure that is certainly even higher in less developed countries [ 12 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • Despite the considerable morbidity and mortality caused by fibrosis, there are currently no effective treatments for many of these diseases and no approved antifibrotic therapies. (hindawi.com)
  • relapse
  • While whole-scale T cell depletion of the allograft can successfully reduce rates of aGvHD, patients receiving T cell-depleted grafts exhibit profound defects in protective immunity, and often die of infection or relapse of their primary disease.10-12 This has created an unmet clinical need for a strategy that more effectively prevents severe aGvHD while preserving the transplant recipient's protective immune response. (knowcancer.com)
  • pathologies
  • An abnormal metabolism or change in the expression of sulfatide has also been associated with various pathologies, including neuropathologies, such as metachromatic leukodystrophy, Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • survival
  • Renal retransplantation in Switzerland: poor HLA matching of first and subsequent allografts does not appear to affect overal graft survival. (booktopia.com.au)
  • Interim phase III trial results in 2011 showed that adding Afinitor (everolimus) to exemestane therapy against advanced breast cancer can significantly improve progression-free survival compared with exemestane therapy alone. (wikipedia.org)
  • induce
  • Four years after thalidomide was withdrawn from the market for its ability to induce severe birth defects, its anti-inflammatory properties were discovered when patients suffering from erythema nodosum leprosum (ENL) used thalidomide as a sedative and it reduced both the clinical signs and symptoms of the disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • Effector
  • Effector memory CD4+ T cells mediate graft-versus-leukemia without inducing graft-versus-host disease. (springer.com)
  • Studies in these diseases have led to the development of a new class of agents, called 'costimulation blockade' reagents, which specifically target activated T cells and block their ability to become fully activated effector cells. (knowcancer.com)
  • It is a derivative of the antitumor antibiotic spergualin, and inhibits the interleukin-2-stimulated maturation of T cells to the S and G2/M phases and the polarization of the T cells into IFN-gamma-secreting Th1 effector T cells, resulting in the inhibition of growth of activated naive CD4 T cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • In patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), disease-associated myelin-specific T cells from the blood are predominantly co-stimulation-independent effector-memory T cells that express high numbers of Kv1.3 channels. (wikipedia.org)
  • cytokines
  • The early work of Ferrara and coworkers showed that inflammatory cytokines play a crucial role in the initial, amplification and cytotoxic phases of the disease (reviewed in Ferrara, 2002). (slideshare.net)