Loading...
  • excessive
  • Both the words diaphoresis and hidrosis can mean either perspiration (in which sense they are synonymous with sweating ) or excessive perspiration, in which case they refer to a specific, narrowly defined, clinical disorder. (wikipedia.org)
  • In this scheme, excessive sweating in an area of 100 square centimeters (16 square inches) or more is differentiated from sweating that affects only a small area. (wikipedia.org)
  • eccrine
  • The gland is large and spongy, located in the subcutaneous fat deep in the dermis, and has a larger overall structure and lumen diameter than the eccrine sweat gland. (wikipedia.org)
  • odor
  • The sweat only attains its characteristic odor upon being degraded by bacteria, which releases volatile odor molecules. (wikipedia.org)
  • perspiration
  • Induced perspiration may be useful to facilitate elimination of some potentially toxic phthalate compounds including DEHP and MEHP. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • Recent research has shown that blood alcohol concentration can also be estimated by measuring alcohol levels in what's called insensible sweat-perspiration that happens before it's perceived as moisture on the skin. (ucsd.edu)
  • electrode
  • Then, the sweat comes into contact with an electrode coated with alcohol oxidase, an enzyme that selectively reacts with alcohol to generate hydrogen peroxide, which is electrochemically detected. (ucsd.edu)
  • body's
  • Sweating is your body's way of cooling itself, not an indicator of how hard you're working. (sparkpeople.com)
  • When the infection has been overcome or drugs such as aspirin or acetaminophen (Tylenol) have been taken, the thermostat resets to normal and the body's cooling mechanisms switch on: the blood moves to the surface and sweating occurs. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • When an infection occurs, fever-inducing agents called pyrogens are released, either by the body's immune system or by the invading cells themselves, that trigger the resetting of the thermostat. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • deficient
  • Drugs that induce hypohidrosis, or deficient sweating, can increase the risk of heat exhaustion or heat stroke and include antimuscarinic anticholinergic agents, carbonic anhydrase inhibitors and tricyclic antidepressants. (springer.com)
  • When hypohidrotic drugs must be continued, deficient sweating can be managed by avoiding situations of heat stress and cooling the skin with externally applied water. (springer.com)
  • pores
  • Both steam rooms and saunas will make a person sweat due to the heat The sweating opens up the pores and helps cleanse the outer skin. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • We are rhythmically chanting this verse inside a Temazcal (prehispanic steam bath) at Na'Lu'um (Maya for Mother Earth) just outside Mérida while sweat pours from our open pores and runs down our drenched skin. (yucatanliving.com)
  • stimulant
  • UC professor Jason Heikenfeld and UC graduate Zachary Sonner came up with a device the size of a Band-Aid that uses a chemical stimulant to produce sweat, even when the patient is relaxed and cool. (news-medical.net)
  • gland
  • This can be explained by the fact that in a disorder with severe sympathetic nerve fiber reduction, sudomotor fibers (but not the sweat gland itself) exhibit chemical hypersensitivity. (oncologynurseadvisor.com)
  • organs
  • This makes it harder for your organs to get fresh blood and oxygen, which can cause cold sweats. (healthline.com)
  • Pain caused by an injury, such as from breaking a bone or getting hit in the head, can cause cold sweats, similar to the way shock can cause sweating as your organs don't get enough oxygen. (healthline.com)
  • skin
  • Candas V, Libert JP, Vogt JJ (1979) Human skin wettedness and evaporative efficiency of sweating. (springer.com)
  • The device consists of a temporary tattoo-which sticks to the skin, induces sweat and electrochemically detects the alcohol level-and a portable flexible electronic circuit board, which is connected to the tattoo by a magnet and can communicate the information to a mobile device via Bluetooth. (ucsd.edu)
  • Tight, thick, dark-colored clothing tends to induce more sweating and increase the risk of skin irritation and overheating in hot climates. (wikihow.com)
  • The sweat test is performed on a small patch of skin on the flexor surface of the forearm , or on the thigh in infant s. (everything2.com)
  • tears
  • Sweat provides a noninvasive alternative, with chemical markers that are more useful in monitoring health than saliva or tears, Heikenfeld said. (news-medical.net)
  • fluid
  • People for a long time ignored sweat because, although it can be a higher-quality fluid for biomarkers, you can't rely on having access to it,' Heikenfeld said. (news-medical.net)
  • ducts
  • Look for a product with a high level of aluminum chloride hexahydrate, which is the ingredient that closes sweat ducts. (wikihow.com)
  • Disease
  • The availability of clinical tests for the assessment of sudomotor dysfunction in neurological disease has enhanced recognition of the complex effects of drugs on sweating. (springer.com)
  • Both generalized and segmented (reduced or absent sweating in circumscribed locations) forms of the disease are usually associated with other underlying conditions. (curehunter.com)
  • fluids
  • For this reason, the initial interview includes questions about thirst, urination, color of fluids, and the amount and timing of sweating. (howstuffworks.com)
  • collect
  • A modified absorbent technique was used to collect sweat at two exercise intensities [55% (I1) and 75% (I2) \( {\dot{\text{V}}\text{O}}_{{2{ \max }}} \) ] in moderately warm conditions (25°C, 50% rh, 2 m s −1 air velocity). (springer.com)
  • This pad will collect the sweat to be measured for chloride content. (everything2.com)
  • alcohol
  • Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a flexible wearable sensor that can accurately measure a person's blood alcohol level from sweat and transmit the data wirelessly to a laptop, smartphone or other mobile device. (ucsd.edu)
  • Now, UC San Diego researchers have developed an alcohol sensor that's wearable, portable and could accurately monitor alcohol level in sweat within 15 minutes. (ucsd.edu)
  • cause
  • In this article, we theoretically investigate a possible cause of the phenomenon by taking various properties of sweating into consideration. (peerj.com)
  • therapeutic
  • Our guía , Roberto Garcia, leads us in our quest to experience the therapeutic and spiritual purifications of an Aztec/Mayan sweat bath or Temazcal . (yucatanliving.com)
  • high
  • At I1 and I2, highest sweat rates were observed on the central (upper and mid) and lower back, with values as high as 1,197, 1,148, and 856 g m −2 h −1 , respectively, at I2. (springer.com)
  • Sweat mapping of the head demonstrated high sweat rates on the forehead (1,710 g m −2 h −1 at I2) compared with low values on the chin (302 g m −2 h −1 at I2) and cheeks (279 g m −2 h −1 at I2). (springer.com)
  • Sweat rate increased significantly in all regions from the low to high exercise intensity, with exception of the feet and ankles. (springer.com)
  • known
  • For many centuries, the Finns have enjoyed some sort of sweat bath, or what would later be known as a sauna. (mercola.com)
  • sauna
  • This deep-sweating is all part of the sauna lifestyle that can help you look and feel better. (mercola.com)
  • Over time, sauna technology has evolved since the early Finnish savu saunas (smoke saunas) and sweat baths. (mercola.com)