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  • Risks
  • As noted above, there is no known exposure threshold for the risks of benzene exposure. (tailieu.vn)
  • The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency recently commissioned the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine to hold a workshop examining what is known about indoor exposure to PM, examining sources of particles, their interaction with other elements of the indoor environment, exposure levels indoors, potential health concerns, ways to limit exposure, vulnerable populations, and means of communicating exposure risks and strategies to reduce exposures. (nationalacademies.org)
  • Median and upper-bound H and P exposures were well above health benchmarks for several compounds, so outdoor measurements likely underestimate long-term health risks from children's exposure to these compounds. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • For example, WHO in 2002 reported that even when exposed to similar levels of tobacco smoke, women are more likely to develop deadly respiratory illnesses, and to do so sooner than men.For these reasons, the United Nations and U.N. member states should acknowledge the special risks women face for NCDs and design appropriate mechanisms to assess women's risks, prevent and treat NCDs in women. (phi.org)
  • The risks of indoor formaldehyde have been studied quite actively since the 1980s, and today the release from construction materials is restricted, e.g. chipboard no longer releases large amounts. (opasnet.org)
  • Asthma
  • A study recently published in the Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology shows the correlation between mold exposure at a young age and the development of childhood asthma. (environmental-expert.com)
  • The study's conclusion, "Early exposure to molds as measured by ERMI at 1 year of age, but not 7 years of age, significantly increased the risk for asthma at 7 years of age. (environmental-expert.com)
  • Contamination of indoor air has been linked in other studies to rising rates of asthma, COPD, Alzheimer's, and other diseases. (environmental-expert.com)
  • The study doesn't prove mold causes asthma , but it does suggest that exposure to mold during infancy is linked to the development of chronic inflammation of the lung airways, which causes wheezing, shortness of breath, chest tightness, and coughing. (cnn.com)
  • But she says this is the first study to suggest mold exposure in children under the age of one seems to play a critical role in a child developing asthma. (cnn.com)
  • Children who got asthma tended to live in homes lacking air conditioning, which can help keep moisture levels down. (cnn.com)
  • Another hypothesis is that the onset of asthma is related to exposure to allergens. (bmj.com)
  • It is widely accepted that exposure to common aeroallergens in the very early years of life is important in determining subsequent development of IgE sensitisation 16 and that IgE sensitisation is strongly linked with development of respiratory symptoms and asthma. (bmj.com)
  • Early exposure to dogs and farm animals and the risk of childhood asthma. (nature.com)
  • Genuneit, J. Exposure to farming environments in childhood and asthma and wheeze in rural populations: a systematic review with meta-analysis. (nature.com)
  • Cat is the major cause of indoor asthma in dry, high altitude areas like Los Alamos, NM, USA, where mites and cockroaches are virtually absent (1) and it adds severely to the burden in more humid climates with high level mite exposure (39). (phadia.com)
  • The objective of this study was to assess the correlation between childhood asthma and potential risk factors, especially exposure to indoor allergens, in a Native American population. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • This research identified several potential indoor and outdoor risk factors for asthma in Mohawks homes, of which avoidance may reduce or delay the development of asthma in susceptible individuals. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • Asthma prevalence has been increasing to epidemic levels, especially in areas with high urbanization. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • This difference is reflected in the number of emergency room visits, hospitalizations and death, and is thought to reflect differences in risk factors of exposure and asthma control with socioeconomic status. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • ventilation
  • The most important sources are indoor sources, and effective ventilation is a good way to avoid problems as is selection of quality materials. (opasnet.org)
  • This report summarizes the results of those investigations, which implicated a local indoor ice arena that had hosted two hockey practice sessions during a 24-hour period when the arena ventilation system was not functioning. (cdc.gov)
  • To prevent similar episodes, ice arena operators should ensure ventilation systems and alarms are operating properly and that levels of NO 2 and carbon monoxide (CO) are monitored continuously for early detection of increased gas levels. (cdc.gov)
  • No other exposures had occurred during the time the ventilation system was not functional. (cdc.gov)
  • biological
  • Airborne microbes or bioaerosols (i.e. viruses, bacteria, fungi, and all biological fragments) flow freely with the airflow and can spread over a wide area in a short period of time, leading them to be a major contributor for affecting indoor air quality (Madureira et al. (springer.com)
  • The data provided evidence that severe facial wrinkles were associated with higher lipid peroxidation levels and reduced glomerular filtration in the kidneys, implying that facial wrinkles are a predictive marker and the biological consequence of underlying high levels of oxidative stress. (cosmeticsandtoiletries.com)
  • particle
  • Calculations based on model projections indicate that climate-change-driven wildfires and changes in outdoor particle transport will increase summertime mean outdoor air levels of fine particles in the western U.S. by thirty to forty percent. (lbl.gov)
  • mold
  • The ERMI test, developed by scientists at the EPA, is a valuable tool for parents to quickly and affordably test their home for elevated levels of mold that could impact their children and everyone who spends time in the home," reported Joe Frasca, Senior Vice President, Marketing at EMSL Analytical, Inc., a leading environmental testing laboratory. (environmental-expert.com)
  • The information allows parents to take corrective actions in their homes if high levels of mold are discovered," he continued. (environmental-expert.com)
  • To learn more about mold, ERMI, indoor air quality (IAQ) or other environmental testing services please visit www.MoldInspectionKit.com , email info@EMSL.com or call (800) 220-3675. (environmental-expert.com)
  • EMLab P&K, a TestAmerica company and the leading commercial indoor air quality (IAQ) laboratory in North America, has helped mold testing clients in the state of Illinois for more than two years through MoldRANGE Local Climate report. (environmental-expert.com)
  • EMLab P&K, a TestAmerica company and the leading commercial indoor air quality (IAQ) laboratory in North America, marks thirteen years of serving communities throughout Virginia and the surrounding states with extensive mold analysis. (environmental-expert.com)
  • If you are in a situation where humidity is trapped in your home, you have a higher risk of mold exposure. (cnn.com)
  • While mold is a natural part of the environment and people are exposed to it on a daily basis, exposure to high levels of mold in the air people breathe can lead to health issues for some," said Paul Cochrane, President of Cochrane and Associates and the IAQ Video Network. (environmental-expert.com)
  • hazardous
  • The Comet assay is being used with increasing popularity in biomonitoring studies to determine the level of DNA damage in workers exposed to potentially hazardous chemicals and radiation. (environmental-expert.com)
  • childhood
  • studies have concluded an association of childhood leukemia, adult cancers & miscarriages with low EMF levels in residential homes (above 4 milliGauss). (gpinspect.com)
  • PCBs
  • An earlier version of this Web page used the terminology "Recommended Public Health Levels for PCBs in Indoor School Air. (epa.gov)
  • EPA revised the terminology to "Exposure Levels for Evaluating PCBs in Indoor School Air" because the Agency believes the revised terminology better reflects the intended purpose of these levels. (epa.gov)
  • For example, if students spend more time in school than was assumed when calculating the values in the table, the levels of PCBs in the school's indoor air may have to be lower to prevent overall exposure from exceeding the RfD. (epa.gov)
  • It's estimated that just about every human being in the world has some level of PCBs in his or her body. (wnpr.org)
  • Exposure to PCBs in schools is difficult to link to any specific illness, according to Brian Toal, an epidemiologist with the Connecticut Department of Public Health. (wnpr.org)
  • Dr. David Carpenter says there is no safe level of airborne PCBs. (wnpr.org)
  • One study from the University of Albany found that a population of Akwesasne Mohawks with high levels of airborne PCBs in their blood were more likely to develop diabetes. (wnpr.org)
  • populations
  • Also, the baseline level of health and access to health care of exposed populations vary widely. (lbl.gov)
  • radon
  • When an investigation was made to determine how and where this worker was being exposed to excessive radiation, investigators found that the air in the man's home contained extremely high levels of 'radon daughters,' the short-lived decay products of radon-222. (cdc.gov)
  • The family relocated until remedial actions to lower the indoor radon levels could be completed. (cdc.gov)
  • Approximately 40% of the homes had radon levels exceeding the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) guideline for indoor radon of 0.02 'working levels. (cdc.gov)
  • About 7% of the homes tested had radon levels at or above the 0.1 working level. (cdc.gov)
  • A working level month is a measure of exposure and is a function of the time of exposure and the level of radon daughters, given in working levels. (cdc.gov)
  • Editorial Note: The elevated radon levels near the eastern border of Pennsylvania are associated with natural uranium deposits that extend into northern New Jersey and southern New York. (cdc.gov)
  • Since similar geologic deposits are found throughout the country, the elevated radon levels in Pennsylvania may indicate a much broader national problem. (cdc.gov)
  • Exposure to radon daughters increases a person's lifetime risk of lung cancer. (cdc.gov)
  • The risk rises in direct relationship with the length of exposure and with radon daughter levels. (cdc.gov)
  • Each year, approximately 5,000-30,000 deaths may be attributed to background levels of indoor radon. (cdc.gov)
  • The health threat from radon can be addressed by identifying geographic areas that could produce elevated levels of indoor radon, developing strategies to reduce exposure, conducting research on effective remedial measures to be taken in buildings, and providing educational programs for health officials and the public. (cdc.gov)
  • Changes in usage patterns of high-radon areas in a home, such as the basement, and the control of future construction in geographic areas high in uranium deposits can reduce exposure. (cdc.gov)
  • Effective remedial measures for individual dwellings can also be used to lower radon exposure. (cdc.gov)
  • Radon in soil is the biggest source of Radon in indoor air and presents a greater risk than Radon in drinking water. (environmental-expert.com)
  • Properties built in certain areas around the world are more likely to contain high levels of Radon due to the underlying geology and varying amounts of uranium present. (environmental-expert.com)
  • health
  • Sold in over 60 countries around the world, Blueair delivers home and office users more clean indoor air for enhanced user health and wellbeing faster than any competing air purifier thanks to its commitment to quality, energy efficiency and environmental care. (environmental-expert.com)
  • Exposure to naphthalene, an International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC)-classified possible carcinogen and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), is widespread, though resulting health effects are poorly understood. (aacrjournals.org)
  • Measurements of urinary 1- and 2-naphthol have shown consistently detectable levels in almost all samples analyzed including 100% of National Health and Nutrition Survey (NHANES) samples tested ( 11 ). (aacrjournals.org)
  • Lower levels of lead can cause adverse health effects on the central nervous system, kidney, and blood cells. (gpinspect.com)
  • Although much less studied to date, indoor exposure to PM-which can result from particles infiltrating from the outdoors and from various indoor sources including candles, cooking, and smoking-is gaining attention as a potential source of adverse health effects. (nationalacademies.org)
  • If you have a continued source of exposure -- which you would if you're in a school or if you're living next to a contaminated site -- that can cause diseases," said Dr. David Carpenter, director of the Institute for Health and the Environment at the University of Albany. (wnpr.org)
  • NIEHS research uses state-of-the-art science and technology to investigate the interplay between environmental exposures, human biology, genetics, and common diseases to help prevent disease and improve human health. (nih.gov)
  • identified 61 studies of the health effects of wildfire smoke exposure. (lbl.gov)
  • In general, the elderly and young children were found to more often experience adverse health effects from wildfire smoke exposure. (lbl.gov)
  • The High Level Meeting on this topic, organized for September 19-20 by the President of the United Nations General Assembly and staffed by the World Health Organization (WHO), provides a singular opportunity for U.N. agencies and member states to demonstrate leadership in their NCD surveillance and prevention activities. (phi.org)
  • susceptible
  • Many schools are likely contaminated, but districts throughout the state have never tested for the toxin, leaving teachers and students susceptible to exposure. (wnpr.org)
  • serum
  • An increased serum level of sIgG is one criterion in the diagnostic procedure of HP and crucial for the detection of the triggering antigen for successful avoidance of further exposure. (medworm.com)
  • PM2.5
  • plotted data from several studies during which PM2.5 levels increased by approximately 30 to 100 micrograms per cubic meter during the wildfires. (lbl.gov)
  • quality
  • They should not be interpreted nor applied as "bright line" or "not-to-exceed" criteria, but may be used to guide thoughtful evaluation of indoor air quality in schools. (epa.gov)
  • estimation
  • Study results show that the often used assumption of uniform pollutant distribution in an occupied space is not always appropriate for estimation of inhalation exposure. (cdc.gov)
  • human
  • An RfD is an estimate of a daily exposure to the human population (i.e., sensitive subgroups) that is likely to be without an appreciable risk of harmful effects during a lifetime. (epa.gov)
  • Experimental and computational methods were used to provide information about the pollutant distribution in the vicinity of the human body for different levels of room air mixing. (cdc.gov)
  • The buoyancy-driven convective plume around a body seems to have a significant influence on pollutant transport and human exposure, especially in the absence of room air mixing. (cdc.gov)
  • Monitoring and surveillance activities are essential to identify and track levels and trends related to chemicals in the environment and human exposure to those chemicals. (gc.ca)
  • The absence of any other plausible cause prompted his conclusion that low-level radiation from Fukushima arriving in immense volumes is responsible for the greatest extermination event in human history. (rense.com)
  • potential
  • Understanding potential downstream effects of naphthalene exposure has become increasingly relevant. (aacrjournals.org)
  • We measured the indoor PM 2.5 concentration and, using Monte-Carlo simulation, estimated potential average daily dose (ADD) of PM 2.5 for homemakers pan-frying a piece of pork inside ordinary homes. (mdpi.com)
  • present the greatest potential for exposure to Canadians. (gc.ca)
  • children
  • EMSL Analytical provides the EPA's ERMI testing methodology to help protect children and families from the hazards of elevated fungal exposure. (environmental-expert.com)
  • Our results show that markers of exposure to naphthalene in children are associated with translocations in a dose-related manner, and that naphthalene may be a clastogen. (aacrjournals.org)
  • Lead levels in U.S. children have been greatly reduced since lead has been removed from gasoline. (gpinspect.com)
  • The level causing irritation is low - about 100 μg/m 3 in adults and 40 μg/m 3 in children. (opasnet.org)
  • risk
  • Chromosomal aberrations, including translocations, are established markers of cancer risk and a biodosimeter of clastogenic exposures. (aacrjournals.org)
  • The highest lifetime risk calculated from studies of uranium miners is 7.3 x 10))-4)) deaths per working level month, and the lowest generally accepted risk is 3.0 x 10))-4)) deaths per working level month (1,2). (cdc.gov)
  • respiratory
  • Exposure to cat allergens is one of the most common causes of respiratory allergic disease and is of worldwide importance. (phadia.com)
  • statistically significant
  • Six of 14 studies reported statistically significant increases in cardiovascular morbidity with wildfire smoke exposure and nine of 13 studies reported statistically significant increases in mortality. (lbl.gov)
  • Source
  • With the source position in this region, exposure can be nine times greater than that calculated with the uniform mixing assumption. (cdc.gov)
  • Environmental and epidemiologic investigations were begun to determine the source of the exposure and identify potentially exposed persons. (cdc.gov)
  • early life
  • Some kinds of early life exposures, such as having older siblings, attending daycare, exposure to animals and being breastfed, have been reported to be protective, perhaps secondary to microbial factors and immunity [ 14 - 16 ]. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)