• 2] Rutter demonstrated the advantage of magnifying chromoendoscopy using indigo carmine for detection of dysplasia compared to conventional colonoscopy without dye spray by back-to-back colonoscopy in patients with longstanding ulcerative colitis. (bmj.com)
  • We hypothesised that routine pancolonic indigo carmine dye spraying would improve the macroscopic detection of dysplasia and reduce the dependence on non-targeted biopsies. (bmj.com)
  • In comparison, a targeted biopsy protocol with pancolonic chromoendoscopy required fewer biopsies (157) yet detected nine dysplastic lesions, seven of which were only visible after indigo carmine application. (bmj.com)
  • In most patients with high-grade dysplasia or early cancer in Barrett's, lesions can be identified with high-resolution endoscopy, with indigo carmine chromoendoscopy and narrow-band imaging as adjunct therapies, finds October's Endoscopy . (gastrohep.com)
  • Indigo carmine chromoendoscopy and narrow-band imaging may be useful techniques to complement high-resolution endoscopy. (gastrohep.com)
  • Dr Kara and colleagues from the Netherlands assessed high-resolution endoscopy combined with indigo carmine chromoendoscopy or narrow-band imaging. (gastrohep.com)
  • The researchers found that the sensitivity for high grade dysplasia or early cancer was 93 % for high-resolution endoscopy-indigo carmine chromoendoscopy. (gastrohep.com)
  • Indigo carmine chromoendoscopy and narrow-band imaging detected a limited number of additional lesions occult to high-resolution endoscopy. (gastrohep.com)
  • Indigo carmine chromoendoscopy and narrow-band imaging are comparable as adjuncts to high-resolution endoscopy. (gastrohep.com)
  • Pancolonic indigo carmine (0.1%) was used during the second colonoscopic examination, and any additional visible abnormalities were biopsied. (bmj.com)
  • We hypothesised that routine pancolonic indigo carmine dye spraying would. (ebscohost.com)
  • Several plants contain indigo, but low concentrations make them difficult to work with and the color is then more easily tainted by other dye substances, typically leading to a greenish tinge. (wikipedia.org)
  • however, the relatively low concentrations of indigo in these plants make them difficult to work with, with the color more easily tainted by other dye substances also present in these plants, typically leading to a greenish tinge. (popflock.com)
  • Abstract To investigate the potential mechanisms by which indigo carmine produces hypertension, we tested the hypothesis that indigo carmine inhibits endothelium-dependent vasodilation and determined the possible site of the inhibition (endothelium versus smooth muscle). (ahajournals.org)
  • In urologic surgery, intravenous injection of indigo carmine is often used to highlight portions of the urinary tract. (wikipedia.org)
  • For this, he perfected histological methods, including one for staining the kidney cells, by the injection of indigo-carmine into the bloodstream. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Indigo carmine, or 5,5′-indigodisulfonic acid sodium salt, is an organic salt derived from indigo by aromatic sulfonation, which renders the compound soluble in water. (wikipedia.org)
  • Using isolated rat thoracic aortic rings that were precontracted with phenylephrine, we examined vasodilatory responses to acetylcholine, histamine, and Ca 2+ ionophore A23187 (in endothelium-intact rings) and sodium nitroprusside and isoproterenol (in endothelium-denuded rings) in the presence and absence of indigo carmine. (ahajournals.org)
  • In addition, the effects of methylene blue on the acetylcholine- and sodium nitroprusside-induced vasodilation were compared with those of indigo carmine. (ahajournals.org)
  • Indigo carmine (10 −4 mol/L) also inhibited endothelium-independent vasorelaxation induced by sodium nitroprusside (an activator of vascular smooth muscle soluble guanylyl cyclase), although to a lesser extent than vasodilation from acetylcholine, histamine, and Ca 2+ ionophore A23187. (ahajournals.org)
  • Indigo carmine (sodium indigotin disulfonate), a blue dye that is often administered intravenously to determine patency of the urinary collecting system, has been reported to cause mild to severe hypertension in some patients. (ahajournals.org)
  • Oxidation by exposure to air converts indoxyl to indigo. (wikipedia.org)
  • Oxidation by exposure to air converts indoxyl to indigotin, the insoluble blue chemical that is the endpoint of indigo dye. (popflock.com)
  • In contrast, indigo carmine (10 −4 mol/L) had no effect on the vasodilation induced by isoproterenol (an activator of adenylyl cyclase), indicating that indigo carmine selectively inhibits nitric oxide-mediated responses. (ahajournals.org)
  • A variety of plants have provided indigo throughout history, but most natural indigo was obtained from those in the genus Indigofera , which are native to the tropics , notably the Indian subcontinent. (wikipedia.org)
  • The primary commercial indigo species in Asia was true indigo ( Indigofera tinctoria , also known as I. sumatrana ). (wikipedia.org)
  • dye wielding Indigofera plants were commonly grown and used throughout the world, in Asia in particular, as an important crop, with the production of indigo dyestuff economically important due to the previous rarity of some blue dyestuffs historically. (popflock.com)
  • however, the crop produced less dyestuff than the average crop of indigo, and was quickly surpassed in terms of favour for the more economical Indigofera tinctoria plant. (popflock.com)
  • The dye was made from the finely crushed flowers of the indigo shrub 'indigofera tinctoria', which grows mainly in the hot regions of India. (oldholland.com)
  • The present work considers an adsorptive removal of Indigo carmine (IC) dye onto nanotube carbon (CNTs). (springer.com)
  • These days, we use the popular colour indigo for making water paints composed from a mixture of synthetic pigments, such as dark madder or carmine with carbon black and phthalo blue. (oldholland.com)
  • Generally used at a concentration around 0.2%, indigo carmine stain is useful as a screening method for diagnosing minute lesions, to differentiate between benign and malignant lesions, as well as to facilitate application of ME to observe and analyze the surface structure of a lesion, delineate boundaries of early stage malignant lesions and estimate the invasion depth of cancer. (wikipedia.org)
  • Recently, we have introduced acetic acid spray in screening colonoscopy to visualize the fine structure of colonic neoplasia, in which ca. 5 ml of 2% acetic acid solution is sprayed toward the targeted lesion in the same manner as for indigo carmine. (bmj.com)
  • Historically, indigo was a natural dye extracted from the leaves of certain plants, and this process was important economically because blue dyes were once rare. (wikipedia.org)
  • In this work, the photocatalytic degradation of indigo carmine (IC) using zinc oxide suspension was studied. (iasj.net)
  • Indigo is among the oldest dyes to be used for textile dyeing and printing. (wikipedia.org)
  • Natural sources also include mollusks: the Murex sea snails produce a mixture of indigo and dibromoindigo (red) which together produce a range of purple hues known as Tyrian purple . (wikipedia.org)
  • Third row: Acetate-indigocarmine mixture (AIM) stained. (wikipedia.org)
  • A large percentage of indigo dye produced today, several thousand tonnes each year, is synthetic . (wikipedia.org)
  • Most indigo dye produced today is synthetic , constituting several thousand tons each year. (popflock.com)
  • Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy after spraying with a solution of indigo carmine dye showed swollen longitudinal folds transversed by linear furrows like "bamboo trees" on the lesser curvature of the gastric body. (ebscohost.com)
  • The method is based on the interaction of chromium with indigo carmine dye in acidic medium and the presence of oxalates as a catalyst for interaction, and after studying the absorption spectrum of the solution resulting observed decrease in the intensity of the absorption. (iasj.net)
  • AbstractThis paper reports on photocatalytic decolorization of a hazardous indigo carmine dye solution. (iasj.net)
  • This improved synthetic indigo was taken into production in 1897. (oldholland.com)
  • The method is based on the oxidation of atenolol with chromate in acidic medium of 1N H2SO4, the residual amount of oxidizing agent is then reacted with indigo carmine dye in the presence of oxalate as a catalyst, the increase in the absorbance of the dye, which is proportional to the amount of the determinants atenolol is then measured at 610 nm. (iasj.net)
  • In 1878, the German Adolf Ritter von Bayer (1835-1917) found another method of preparing the indigo pigment synthetically. (oldholland.com)
  • Indigo dye is an organic compound with a distinctive blue color (see indigo ). (wikipedia.org)
  • These results suggest that indigo carmine, like methylene blue, may inhibit endothelium-dependent relaxation by a mechanism that involves two levels. (ahajournals.org)
  • The second day we got to work with cochineal, indigo, and brazil wood to create reds, blues, and purples. (cocktailsandcraft.com)
  • Next, I pulverized the indigo paste, which took more hard molcajete work. (cocktailsandcraft.com)
  • Although not absorbed by the cells, indigo carmine stain, sprayed onto regions of interest, highlights the topography of the mucosal surface with its blue coloring. (wikipedia.org)
  • The primary use for indigo is as a dye for cotton yarn, which is mainly for the production of denim cloth for blue jeans. (wikipedia.org)
  • On average, a pair of blue jean pants requires 3-12 g of indigo. (wikipedia.org)
  • The effect of influential parameters such as initial indigo carmine concentration and catalyst loading were studied with the effect of Vis irradiation in the presence of reused ZnO was also investigated. (iasj.net)
  • It has been found that the photocatalytic degradation of indigo carmine obeyed the pseudo-first-order kinetic reaction in presence of zinc oxide. (iasj.net)
  • [4] Indigo, used as a dye, made its way to the Greeks and the Romans , where it was valued as a luxury product. (wikipedia.org)
  • This made me appreciate how precious indigo is and also made me want to dye with more indigo! (cocktailsandcraft.com)
  • Then we made the indigo bath and brazil wood baths. (cocktailsandcraft.com)
  • Indigo was also cultivated in India , which was also the earliest major center for its production and processing. (wikipedia.org)
  • The name indigo comes from the Spanish word 'indico', which means Indian. (oldholland.com)