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  • tribe
  • Vine Deloria, Jr. (March 26, 1933 - November 13, 2005) was an a Native American author , theologian, historian , and political activist from the Yankton Sioux tribe of South Dakota . (newworldencyclopedia.org)
  • Deloria's father, Vine Sr., studied English and Christian theology, became an Episcopal archdeacon and missionary on the Standing Rock Indian Reservation, to which he transferred the family's Sioux Tribe citizenship. (newworldencyclopedia.org)
  • From the mid-1800s, the official policy of the United States government toward the American Indian was to confine each tribe to a specific parcel of land called a reservation. (familysearch.org)
  • Their duties included maintaining the peace, making payments to the Native Americans based on the stipulations of the treaties with each tribe, and providing a means of communication between the native population and the federal government. (familysearch.org)
  • Diana Miller and her grandmother, Che-mon Louis Amour, were chosen to represent the Menominee Indian Tribe. (menominee.edu)
  • 20th
  • Our American Stories explores the dynamic and shifting relationship America had with her new immigrants in the 20th century. (pbs.org)
  • Parallel to the growing influence of socialist and communist wings the indigenismo emerged, initially in an inter-American context at the beginning of the 20th century in Mexico. (uni-bielefeld.de)
  • treaty
  • Articles of a treaty made and concluded at La Pointe of Lake Superior, in the Territory of Wisconsin, between Robert Stuart commissioner on the part of the United States, and the Chippewa Indians of the Mississippi, and Lake Superior, by their chiefs and headmen. (kbic-nsn.gov)
  • it being the intention of the parties to this treaty, to include in this cession, all the Chippewa lands eastwardly of the aforesaid line running from the American Fur Company's trading post on the Fond du Lac river to the intersection of the line of the treaty made with the Chippewas of the Mississippi July 29th 1837. (kbic-nsn.gov)
  • It is agreed by the parties to this treaty, that whenever the Indians shall be required to remove from the ceded district, all the unceded lands belonging to the Indians of Fond du Lac, Sandy Lake, and Mississippi bands, shall be the common property and home of all the Indians, party to this treaty. (kbic-nsn.gov)
  • colonial
  • In the East and Southeast, from early colonial times, there was much disagreement regarding the nature of the relations with the Indian nations. (encyclopedia.com)
  • There was also a constant need to have allies among the Indian nations during the period of European colonial rivalry on the North American continent, a need that the newly formed United States felt with great urgency during the first generation of its existence. (encyclopedia.com)
  • From a historical perspective it has to be pointed out that concepts like 'indio', 'Ind gena', 'Indian' or 'Aboriginal' are a colonial invention. (uni-bielefeld.de)
  • We have to point out that the American societies are also after independence characterized by the colonial longue dur e and the exclusion of the indigenous population. (uni-bielefeld.de)
  • Great Plains
  • Those known today as Sioux (the Dakota, the Lakota, and the Nakota), living primarily in the upper Great Plains region, are among the best-known Indians within American popular culture due to their participation in what Americans perceive to have been dramatic events within their own history, such as the Battle of the Little Big Horn in the late nineteenth century. (encyclopedia.com)
  • They migrated into Alaska and northern Canada, south along the Pacific Coast, into the interior of Canada, and south to the Great Plains and the American Southwest. (wikipedia.org)
  • anthropologists
  • In the book he said, "The massive amount of useless knowledge produced by anthropologists attempting to capture real Indians in a network of theories has contributed substantially to the invisibility of Indian people today. (newworldencyclopedia.org)
  • Linguists, anthropologists and archeologists believe their ancestors comprised a separate migration into North America, later than the first Paleo-Indians. (wikipedia.org)
  • sovereign nations
  • The Sioux had no way of knowing about the process that had worked itself out in the East and Southeast, whereby, in direct contravention of a U.S. Supreme Court decision ( Worchester vs. Georgia ), Indians would no longer be dealt with as sovereign nations. (encyclopedia.com)
  • history
  • Making America tells the story of the peopling of the New World, of how land came to define the settling and identity of America, and of how the guests' ancestors were part of this history. (pbs.org)
  • This history of injustice largely explains why Indians are among the most impoverished groups in the United States and other countries. (britannica.com)
  • The history of the U.S. (toward American Indians) is not a bright record. (ljworld.com)
  • In it he addressed Indian stereotypes and challenged white audiences to take a new look at the history of American western expansionism. (newworldencyclopedia.org)
  • subsistence
  • The man who earns his subsistence from hunting, who survives, as the Indians say, from the land, depends on knowing where he must stand in the strangely efficient and mysterious balance that is arranged for the propagation of all life. (barnesandnoble.com)
  • policies
  • This up-to-date survey is the first one-volume source for those interested in educational reform policies and missionary and government efforts to Christianize and "civilize" American Indian children. (barnesandnoble.com)
  • constitute
  • While there is a general understanding that the indigenous nations of North America once existed as fully self-governing entities, those concerned with the matter have proven spectacularly unable to arrive at even a common definition of what constitutes (or might constitute) contemporary Indian self-governance, whether it presently exists or, if it does not, how it might be achieved. (nzdl.org)
  • possibilities
  • She sponsored a bill which called for an investigation of the possibilities of Indians managing their own affairs "without supervision and control by the Federal Government. (uen.org)
  • Congress
  • The Indians stipulate for the right of hunting on the ceded territory, with the other usual privileges of occupancy, until required to remove by the President of the United States, and that the laws of the United States shall be continued in force, in respect to their trade and inter course with the whites, until otherwise ordered by Congress. (kbic-nsn.gov)
  • federal
  • Further, they argue, while American Indians within the United States are acknowledged to still belong to their various indigenous polities, they are also citizens of the U.S. under provision of the 1887 General Allotment Act and the 1924 Indian Citizenship Act and are thus doubly subordinate to the federal system. (nzdl.org)
  • participants
  • At their most benign, these reports have become the equivalent of a contemporary parlor game, especially for white Americans who make up the vast majority of the participants. (blogspot.com)
  • made
  • What made America? (pbs.org)
  • Efforts were made to teach the Indians about farming methods, the Catholic religion, and other matters. (familysearch.org)
  • Whereas the Indians have expressed a strong desire to have some provision made for their half breed relatives, therefore it is agreed, that fifteen thousand (15,000) dollars shall be paid to said Indians, next year, as a present, to be disposed of, as they, together with their agent, shall determine in council. (kbic-nsn.gov)
  • government
  • The U.S. government has spent hundreds of millions of dollars over the past 40 years trying to uncover a biological explanation for why the Pima Indians of southern Arizona have one of the highest rates of diabetes in the world. (unnaturalcauses.org)