• X-linked hypophosphatemia (XLH) is a dominant disorder with a prevalence of approximately one case per 20,000 live births [ 1 ]. (uptodate.com)
  • Based on regional and anecdotal reports, there is concern that vitamin D-deficiency rickets is persistent in Canada despite guidelines for its prevention. (cmaj.ca)
  • We sought to determine the incidence and clinical characteristics of vitamin D-deficiency rickets among children living in Canada. (cmaj.ca)
  • A total of 2325 Canadian pediatricians were surveyed monthly from July 1, 2002, to June 30, 2004, through the Canadian Paediatric Surveillance Program to determine the incidence, geographic distribution and clinical profiles of confirmed cases of vitamin D-deficiency rickets. (cmaj.ca)
  • There were 104 confirmed cases of vitamin D- deficiency rickets during the study period. (cmaj.ca)
  • Vitamin D-deficiency rickets is persistent in Canada, particularly among children who reside in the north and among infants with darker skin who are breast-fed without appropriate vitamin D supplementation. (cmaj.ca)
  • Despite these guidelines and public health measures, a number of regional studies 1 , 9 - 12 and our own clinical experience suggested that vitamin D-deficiency rickets is a persis-tent problem among infants and children in Canada. (cmaj.ca)
  • The primary cause of congenital rickets is vitamin D deficiency in the mother's blood, which the baby shares. (wikipedia.org)
  • As stated in the title of the condition, these children develop rickets which is a term used to describe the various bony abnormalities that result from low phosphate levels. (rchsd.org)
  • Since there were no reported cases of breast-fed children having received regular vitamin D (400 IU/d) from birth who developed rickets, the current guidelines for rickets prevention can be effective but are not being consistently implemented. (cmaj.ca)
  • 5 Human milk, the ideal fluid source for infants in the first year of life, is not a rich source of vitamin D. 6 In view of this, Health Canada 7 and the Canadian Paediatric Society 8 recommend that, for the prevention of rickets, Canadian infants and children receive 10 μg (400 IU) of vitamin D per day through either diet or supplementation. (cmaj.ca)
  • Also exclusively breast-fed infants may require rickets prevention by vitamin D supplementation or an increased exposure to sunlight. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cases of what is believed to have been rickets has been described since the 1st century. (wikipedia.org)