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  • renal function
  • In order to estimate the incidence, predictors of hyperuricemia in pediatric liver transplant recipients, and to assess whether hyperuricemia may impact long-term renal function determined by measured GFR, we reviewed data of 70 children who received a first liver transplant between 1991 and 2005 (median follow-up 7.1 yr). (ovid.com)
  • risk
  • Sweetened beverage consumption and the risk of hyperuricemia in Mexican adults: a cross-sectional study. (medscape.com)
  • Higher consumption of sugar-sweetened soft drinks increases the risk of hyperuricemia in Korean population: The Korean Multi-Rural Communities Cohort Study. (medscape.com)
  • We examined cross-sectional data for consistency with the hypothesis that POPs are a common underlying risk factor of both MetS and hyperuricemia. (nih.gov)
  • Among all subjects, the risk of hyperuricemia was higher for higher serum concentrations of OC pesticides, PCDDs, and dioxin-like PCBs. (nih.gov)
  • This study is consistent with our hypothesis that the risk of hyperuricemia relates to background exposure to a mixture of POPs even among persons without MetS. (nih.gov)
  • The only factor significantly associated with an increased risk of hyperuricemia was older age. (ovid.com)
  • Considering that type 2 diabetes and hyperuricemia are vice-versa in each other's important risk factors, the use of mulberry originated phytotherapeutics might provide an excellent option for the prevention and/or treatment of both conditions. (hindawi.com)
  • Hyperuricemia was a risk factor for high triglyceride ((OR: 2.13, 95% CI: 1.156-3.9266) and high total cholesterol (OR: 2.313, 95% CI: 1.364-3.923) in men and for high low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (OR: 2.696, 95% CI: 1.386-5.245) in women. (springer.com)
  • Conclusions: heavy alcohol consumption increased the risk of hyperuricemia for males but not for females. (mdpi.com)
  • Among both males and females, moderate alcohol consumption did not increase the risk of hyperuricemia. (mdpi.com)
  • recipients
  • Hyperuricemia is a common feature in adult liver transplant recipients but there is limited information in children. (ovid.com)
  • 1 , 2 Several factors were reported to predispose recipients to hyperuricemia, including insufficient allograft function, 3 treatment with diuretics, immunosuppression with cyclosporine, 4 a calcineurin inhibitor (CNI), and immunosuppression with mizoribine. (dovepress.com)
  • dysfunction
  • In a study of over 2500 people resident in Taiwan, a blood lead level exceeding 7.5 microg/dL (a small elevation) had odds ratios of 1.92 (95% CI: 1.18-3.10) for renal dysfunction and 2.72 (95% CI: 1.64-4.52) for hyperuricemia. (wikipedia.org)
  • primary
  • After adjustment for donor and recipient age, gender, primary liver disease, immunosuppression, and post-operative acute renal failure, hyperuricemia as time dependent variable tended to predict (p = 0.05) subsequent CRI. (ovid.com)
  • diabetes
  • Finally, enhanced reabsorption of uric acid distal to the site of secretion is the mechanism thought to be responsible for the hyperuricemia observed with diuretic therapy and diabetes insipidus. (medscape.com)
  • gouty
  • Although acute gouty attacks are self-limited when hyperuricemia is left untreated for years, such attacks can recur intermittently, involving multiple joints. (britannica.com)
  • hypoxanthine
  • Foods high in the purines adenine and hypoxanthine may be more potent in exacerbating hyperuricemia. (wikipedia.org)
  • Several groups have reported that hyperuricemia can be associated with different types of kinetic alterations in the enzyme phosphoribosylpyrophosphate (PRPP) synthetase (1-3) or a deficiency in hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (4-5). (springer.com)
  • More precisely, hypoxanthine is considered to be an important factor contributing to hyperuricemia [ 2 ]. (hindawi.com)