• The aim of present study was to evaluate relationships between degree of portal hypertension, severity of the disease, and bleeding status in patients with liver cirrhosis. (mdpi.com)
  • It is much less common than the other type, called essential hypertension , affecting only 5-10% of hypertensive patients. (wikipedia.org)
  • The precise mechanism of orthostatic hypertension remains unclear, but it is thought that alpha-adrenergic activity may be the predominant pathophysiologic mechanism of orthostatic hypertension in elderly hypertensive patients. (wikipedia.org)
  • The risk of orthostatic hypertension has been found to increase with age, with it being found in 16.3% of older hypertensive patients. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hypertensive retinopathy together with left ventricular hypertrophy and renal impairment are considered as an indicator of target organ damage There is positive evidence that treating hypertension in the elderly and very elderly provides clinical benefits. (springer.com)
  • The authors not only outline the pathophysiology of hypertension in children, but also offer current information on blood pressure measurement, the proper techniques for diagnosis, the assessment of hypertensive end-organ damage even in childhood, and the use of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. (springer.com)
  • Hypertensive emergencies were previously known, in some cases, as malignant hypertension. (healthline.com)
  • To determine whether learning stress management techniques could help people manage systolic hypertension without drugs, the researchers randomized 122 hypertensive men and women aged 55 and older to 8 weeks of relaxation response training or a control group. (reuters.com)
  • The Editor and the contributors not only discuss important issues on hypertension management and its deleterious consequences if it is not well‐controlled, but also highlight the important signaling pathways involved in the pathogenesis of hypertensive heart disease and cardiac hypertrophy. (springer.com)
  • In summary, hypertensive kidney disease represents a challenging complication of hypertension. (jamaica-gleaner.com)
  • In patients with sporadically elevated blood pressure or white coat hypertension, a 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring is useful. (springer.com)
  • Home blood pressure measurement is useful not only for the diagnosis of white coat hypertension and masked hypertension, but also for evaluating the effectiveness of antihypertensive treatment. (nature.com)
  • Patients with white coat hypertension should be followed up periodically (every 3-6 months) even without treatment. (nature.com)
  • A recent study cites white coat hypertension, a term coined for people whose blood pressure rises in the presence of a doctor. (latimes.com)
  • White coat hypertension is the increase in blood pressure experienced by many people, especially women ² when being tested at the local clinic . (everything2.com)
  • Ocular hypertension occurs when the pressure in your eyes is above the range considered normal with no detectable changes in vision or damage to the structure of your eyes. (aoa.org)
  • Ocular hypertension can occur in people of all ages, but it occurs more frequently in African Americans, people over age 40 and people with family histories of ocular hypertension and/or glaucoma. (aoa.org)
  • Against widely shared assumption, hypertension is not a disease that predominantly occurs with age. (seattlepi.com)
  • Because these genes play an integral role in normal blood pressure control, researchers suspect that variations in them might impair blood pressure control and contribute to hypertension. (medlineplus.gov)
  • NEW YORK -- Hypertension appears to increase the risk of mild cognitive impairment, primarily the nonamnestic form of the disorder in which memory is not significantly affected, researchers here said. (medpagetoday.com)
  • Now some researchers have found a hormone apparently linked to hypertension that may be its cause. (chicagotribune.com)
  • In related work, Baltimore scientists collaborating with researchers from the UpJohn Co. in Kalamazoo, Mich., found that a substance that regulates sodium levels in cells also turns out to be ouabain, which may explain the link between salt consumption and hypertension in some people. (chicagotribune.com)
  • The study, which appears today in the Lancet medical journal, drew sharp criticism from hypertension researchers, who said it ignored extensive clinical evidence on the benefits of controlling hypertension. (latimes.com)
  • Oftentimes patients don't even correctly understand the meaning of the word "hypertension," and think of it more in terms of stress, anxiety, or other psychological disturbance rather than what it actually is, namely a physiological dysfunction that can turn into a chronic disease if untreated, the researchers found. (seattlepi.com)
  • The causes for primary hypertension are complex interaction of genes and environmental factors. (conservapedia.com)
  • Orthostatic hypertension, or postural hypertension, is a medical condition consisting of a sudden and abrupt increase in blood pressure when a person stands up. (wikipedia.org)
  • Orthostatic hypertension is diagnosed by a rise in systolic blood pressure of 20 mmHg or more when standing. (wikipedia.org)
  • Aortitis (inflammation of the aorta) with nephroptosis: "This orthostatic hypertension largely may be due to an activation of the renin system caused by nephroptosis and partly due to a reduced baroreflex sensitivity caused by aortitis" Pheochromocytoma Blood pressure variability is associated with progression of target organ damage and cardiovascular risk. (wikipedia.org)
  • Australian National Blood Pressure Management Committee: The Australian Therapeutic Trial in Mild Hypertension. (springer.com)
  • Effects of intensive blood-pressure lowering and low-dose aspirin in patients with hypertension: principal results of the Hypertension Optimal Treatment (HOT) randomized trial. (springer.com)
  • If the blood pressure reaches 140/90 or higher on two separate occasions, the person is said to suffer from hypertension. (buzzle.com)
  • When the blood pressure is slightly higher than 120/80, such condition is termed as pre-hypertension. (buzzle.com)
  • Resistant hypertension is defined in this study as a systolic blood pressure in the office above 160 despite treatment with at least three blood pressure drugs, one of which is a diuretic. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • Hypertension is defined as a systolic blood pressure (SBP) above 140 mm Hg, or a diastolic blood pressure (DBP) above 90 mm Hg at rest. (softpanorama.org)
  • Hypertension is defined as a blood pressure reading of 140/90mmHg (millimeters of mercury) or above. (bartleby.com)
  • Hypertension is defined as blood pressure greater than 140/90 mm Hg on two or more blood pressure readings taken at each of two or more visits after initial screening. (bartleby.com)
  • So patients who have hypertension are at a possible risk to developing a serious disease caused by this increase in blood pressure. (bartleby.com)
  • Individuals with the condition, known as isolated systolic hypertension, who participated in relaxation training had a better chance of being able to drop at least one of their blood pressure drugs than individuals in a control group who did not participate in relaxation training, Dr. Jeffery A. Dusek of Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston and colleagues found. (reuters.com)
  • Up to three-quarters of elderly people with hypertension have isolated systolic hypertension, which is a "therapeutic challenge" to treat effectively, given the risk of lowering diastolic blood pressure too much, as well as the fact that many elderly people take multiple medications, they note. (reuters.com)
  • Blood pressure above 139/89 is considered hypertension. (conservapedia.com)
  • The opposite of Hypertension is Hypotension , referring to low blood pressure. (conservapedia.com)
  • In general, Hypertension is the direct result of thick blood. (conservapedia.com)
  • Time to Abandon Clinic Blood Pressure for the Diagnosis of Hypertension? (ahajournals.org)
  • Of course, we shouldn't go overboard: Oregon only looked at hypertension , cholesterol, and blood sugar. (dictionary.com)
  • Kids with severe hypertension should not do any weightlifting or power-lifting, bodybuilding, or strength training until their blood pressure is under control and a doctor says it's OK. (kidshealth.org)
  • For example, Michael Alderman , an expert in hypertension and the chairman of the department of epidemiology and social medicine at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, in the Bronx, NY, says that there are daily situations in which raising blood pressure is an advantage. (technologyreview.com)
  • Approximately 2/3 of treated women with Hypertension still have uncontrolled Blood Pressure. (bellaonline.com)
  • In animal studies, magnesium supplementation seemed to be most effective in the young with elevated blood pressure, before they developed hypertension. (healthline.com)
  • If this is disturbed in any way, it could lead to hypertension. (buzzle.com)
  • Obesity typically lead to hypertension with as the person ages. (softpanorama.org)
  • In order to control hypertension, you have to follow a healthy diet and maintain a balanced lifestyle. (buzzle.com)
  • Is it for everyone with hard-to-control hypertension? (huffingtonpost.com)
  • and the following partnering professional organizations: American Academy of Physician Assistants, Association of Black Cardiologists, American College of Preventive Medicine, American Geriatrics Society, American Pharmacists Association, American Society of Hypertension, American Society for Preventive Cardiology, National Medical Association, and Preventive Cardiovascular Nurses Association. (annals.org)
  • The center is accredited by the American Society of Hypertension (ASH) - the first center west of the Mississippi to earn this designation. (ohsu.edu)
  • In spite of that the risks associated can vary depending on the degree of hypertension, this disease remains a leading cause of maternal, fetal and neonatal morbidity and mortality rates. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • More practitioners - doctors and nurses - are required to make the guidelines effective in reducing hypertension-related morbidity. (bmj.com)
  • 2. Literature review This chapter reviews the literature on hypertension and hyperlipidaemia and their relation to risk factors including age, gender, genetics, diet and weight, alcohol, smoking, lack of activity and co-morbidity. (bartleby.com)
  • Increased occurrence of silent cerebrovascular ischemia Systolic orthostatic hypertension increases stroke risk. (wikipedia.org)
  • Still other genes have been linked to hypertension risk, although the roles most of them play in development of the condition are still unclear. (medlineplus.gov)
  • However, people with ocular hypertension have an increased risk of glaucoma. (aoa.org)
  • Engaging in healthy lifestyle behaviors at all stages of life, regardless of race or ethnicity, can help keep your risk for hypertension in check. (eatright.org)
  • However, people with diabetes and individuals who are overweight also are at increased risk for developing hypertension. (eatright.org)
  • BOSTON -- Albumin excretion at the upper end of the normal range significantly increases the risk of hypertension in otherwise low-risk patients, according to new analyses of the Nurses' Health Study. (medpagetoday.com)
  • Ocular hypertension is defined as a higher than normal intraocular pressure (eye pressure) that significantly increases the risk of developing glaucoma. (news-medical.net)
  • Several factors that are associated with ocular hypertension can further increase the risk of glaucoma onset. (news-medical.net)
  • Therefore, while evaluating glaucoma risk factors, it is important to keep in mind that people with thinner corneas and ocular hypertension are more susceptible to glaucoma than those with thicker corneas and ocular hypertension. (news-medical.net)
  • Definitions of hypertension in children, predictors of future hypertension, risk factors-race and ethnicity, diet, obesity, and society-and special populations are discussed at length. (springer.com)
  • All three trials showed that therapy for hypertension in the elderly reduces the risk of stroke and cardiovascular events. (who.int)
  • Describe the risk factors for neonatal hypertension. (seattlechildrens.org)
  • Our current preventive routine focuses on treating such cardiac risk factors as hypertension and cholesterol. (dictionary.com)
  • No applicant who has palpable arteries or hypertension can be considered a first class risk. (dictionary.com)
  • People with both a low level of fitness and a parent with hypertension had a 70 percent higher risk for developing hypertension, compared with highly fit people with no parental history, Shook said. (upi.com)
  • Consuming too little calcium may put you at greater risk for hypertension, according to research at Oregon Health Sciences University in Portland. (latimes.com)
  • At the Hypertension Clinic, located within the Sanford Bemidji Heart and Vascular Center, we provide a risk factor reduction education program addressing: diet, exercise and medical management of comorbidities linked with coronary artery disease, heart attack, stroke, peripheral artery disease, diabetes and renal failure. (sanfordhealth.org)
  • In addition to the risk of hypertension, obesity further enhances total cardiovascular risk and all-cause mortality [ 2 ]. (uptodate.com)
  • In about 95 percent of cases, the cause of hypertension is unknown. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Hypertension is the leading cause of stroke and a major cause of heart attack. (bartleby.com)
  • By one estimate I've seen, hypertension control has cut the death rate from stroke in half, and from heart attacks by a third. (dictionary.com)
  • The DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) plan includes lowering sodium intake and eating whole grains, fruits, vegetables and low-fat dairy products. (livescience.com)