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  • Interox
  • That is the level (single digit parts per trillion) to which metallic impurities in Solvay's INTEROX® Pico Hydrogen Peroxide need to be detected and eliminated. (solvay.com)
  • INTEROX® Hydrogen Peroxide Pico and PicoPlus are two of a range of Electronic Wet Chemicals produced by Solvay's GBU Special Chem (others include ultra pure Phosphoric Acid & Hydrofluoric Acid). (solvay.com)
  • bleach
  • Use hydrogen peroxide to bleach or clean hard-to-reach or especially grimy areas. (staples.com)
  • Hydrogen peroxide is found in many households at low concentrations (3-9%) for medicinal applications and as a clothes and hair bleach. (cdc.gov)
  • In industry, hydrogen peroxide in higher concentrations is used as a bleach for textiles and paper, as a component of rocket fuels, and for producing foam rubber and organic chemicals. (cdc.gov)
  • orally
  • The case can definitely be made that one should never overuse hydrogen peroxide, either orally or intravenously, but that is the case for almost anything. (hubpages.com)
  • chlorine
  • Hydrogen peroxide can be used for certain industrial or environmental purposes as well, because it can provide the effects of bleaching without the potential damage of chlorine -based agents. (wisegeek.com)
  • treatments
  • Although antiviral medications and pain relievers are standard treatments for this infection, hydrogen peroxide is a common home remedy that if used early, may dry the sores and speed healing. (livestrong.com)
  • As a result, favorable environmental regulations in developing regions are expected to stimulate the demand for hydrogen peroxide for wastewater treatments and in remediation of soil and groundwater contaminated by organic and inorganic compounds. (sbwire.com)
  • flush
  • This site says after using hydrogen peroxide you should flush your ears with rubbing alcohol to dry out your ear canals (which makes sense since rubbing alcohol is sometimes used on swimmer's ear). (healthboards.com)
  • compounds
  • Hydrogen peroxide released to the atmosphere will react very rapidly with other compounds found in air. (cdc.gov)
  • If released to soil, hydrogen peroxide will be broken down by reacting with other compounds. (cdc.gov)
  • In most of its reactions, hydrogen peroxide oxidizes other substances, although it is itself oxidized by a few compounds, such as potassium permanganate. (britannica.com)
  • The wide range of applications of hydrogen peroxide mainly stem from its ability to oxidize a variety of organic and inorganic compounds and the amazing germicidal properties. (sbwire.com)
  • strains
  • Brinez WJ, Roig-Sagués AX, Hernández Herrero MM, López-Pedemonte T, Guamis B (2006) Bactericidal efficacy of peracetic acid in combination with hydrogen peroxide against pathogenic and non pathogenic strains of Staphylococcus spp. (springer.com)
  • harmful
  • Tower's research group set out to find the signal by probing the action of an enzyme in mitochondria that converts toxic by-products of the body's combustion process into hydrogen peroxide, itself a harmful but less toxic substance which other defenses later break down further. (redorbit.com)
  • cures
  • It seems clear from my readings that people are actually drinking this stuff… or at least claiming to drink hydrogen peroxide on websites geared towards selling cures…of a dubious nature. (medium.com)
  • bleaching agent
  • The impressive growth of the textile industry, coupled with rising applications of hydrogen peroxide as an environment-friendly bleaching agent and the continuous growth of electronics industry in Asia Pacific, has boosted the regional market. (sbwire.com)
  • sanitation
  • Coupled with this, growing spending of a large number of consumers on sanitation products has stimulated the demand for hydrogen peroxide in personal care products. (sbwire.com)
  • product
  • Because hydrogen peroxide is produced by mitochondria as a product of metabolism, it's a great candidate for a relevant signal that might be modulating these cellular rhythms," Tower said. (redorbit.com)