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  • cell
  • The influence of hydrogel stiffness on the cell behaviors including cell viability, cell morphology, and maintenance of chondrogenic phenotype was evaluated. (mdpi.com)
  • These hydrogels not only retain cells in the infarcted area, but also provide support for restoring myocardial wall stress and cell survival and functioning. (mdpi.com)
  • encapsulation
  • Cytocompatibility of the hydrogel was demonstrated by encapsulation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs). (springer.com)
  • After initial encapsulation the remaining molecules form connections between the individual micelles to form a network within the aqueous media called a hydrogel, creating a diffuse and relatively constant concentration of the encapsulated particle within the gel. (wikipedia.org)
  • injectable
  • STINGel combines a new class of immunotherapy drugs called stimulator of interferon gene (STING) agonists with an injectable hydrogel that releases the drug in a steady dose to activate the immune system to kill cancer cells. (rice.edu)
  • A synthetic, injectable hydrogel developed at Rice University boosted the toxicity of a new class of cancer-fighting immunotherapy drugs. (rice.edu)
  • Novel
  • This chapter presents a novel fabrication method using a wet-spinning process that allows for the routine production of multifunctional coaxial hydrogel fibers that take advantage of the encapsulating properties of a hydrogel core while also promoting good cell growth and biocompatibility via the use of bio-friendly material in the sheath. (intechopen.com)
  • Hennink WE, van Nostrum CF (2002) Novel crosslinking methods to design hydrogels. (springer.com)
  • In 2015, The Indian Agriculture Research Institute (IARI) reported the development of a novel hydrogel for agricultural use. (wikipedia.org)
  • necrotic
  • For instance, in the presence of a dry wound, where additional hydration is necessary, the use of highly hydrated hydrogels can allow the autolytic debridement of necrotic tissue when its surgical removal is not feasible. (springer.com)
  • Sustained-release drug delivery systems Providing absorption, desloughing and debriding of necrotic and fibrotic tissue Hydrogels that are responsive to specific molecules, such as glucose or antigens, can be used as biosensors, as well as in DDS. (wikipedia.org)
  • temperature
  • Protein-based hydrogels have substantial advantages such as biocompatibility, biodegradability, tunable mechanical properties, molecular binding abilities, and intelligent responses to external stimuli such as pH, ionic strength, and temperature. (springer.com)
  • Inorganic salts, when absorbed, will result in changing the hydrogels to a lower temperature whereas cat-ionic surfactant will shift the temperature the other way. (wikipedia.org)
  • The temperature of these hydrogels are around 40 degrees Celsius, making it a possible candidate for use as biomaterial. (wikipedia.org)
  • Unlike the thermoplastics that are often utilized in traditional 3D printing, the chain entanglements and ionic interactions within the hydrogel-like bioink rather than temperature dominate shape fidelity. (wikipedia.org)
  • These hydrogels have the ability to sense changes of pH, temperature, or the concentration of metabolite and release their load as result of such a change. (wikipedia.org)
  • monomers
  • Synthetic hydrogels exhibit high water absorption capacities and proper mechanical strength, although their applications are being limited because of low biocompatibility and biodegradability as well as the toxicity arisen from unreacted monomers remained in the gel structure. (springer.com)
  • Tissue Engineering
  • Hydrogel materials have shown a great promise to be used as templates for tissue engineering and implantable devices. (intechopen.com)
  • Among the many production techniques available, advanced fiber processing, such as coaxial and triaxial spinning of natural hydrogels, has attracted a great deal of attention because the basic core-sheath structure provides a drug delivery system capable of delivering high concentrations of drug for localized drug delivery and tissue engineering applications. (intechopen.com)
  • Collagen has more recently been used in tissue engineering applications, by creating hydrogels that provide structure to engineered tissue. (jove.com)
  • This video introduces collagen as a biomaterial, demonstrates how it is harvested from porcine skin, and shows how the material is used to create a hydrogel for tissue engineering applications. (jove.com)
  • Martens PJ, Bryant SJ, Anseth KS (2003) Tailoring the degradation of hydrogels formed from multivinyl poly(ethylene glycol) and poly(vinyl alcohol) macromers for cartilage tissue engineering. (springer.com)
  • Lee KY, Mooney DJ (2001) Hydrogels for tissue engineering. (springer.com)
  • An international team led by the Wyss Institute recently used microfabrication techniques to design a new micropatterned hydrogel that shows great promise for tissue engineering - cardiac tissue in particular. (harvard.edu)
  • A review of trends and limitations in hydrogel-rapid prototyping for tissue engineering. (springer.com)
  • These flesh-like properties have motivated the research and development of self-healing hydrogels in fields such as reconstructive tissue engineering as scaffolding, as well as use in passive and preventive applications. (wikipedia.org)
  • aqueous
  • A method of producing a hydrogel product comprises impregnating a coherent fibrous structure with an aqueous solution of a hydrogel precursor material, said fibres incorporating cations which are capable of cross-linking said precursor material to form a fibre reinforced hydrogel as the hydrogel pro. (google.co.uk)
  • protein
  • Protein can be converted to hydrogel using physical, chemical, or enzymatic treatments. (springer.com)
  • This chapter intends to look over protein-based hydrogels. (springer.com)
  • After brief introduction of protein and its structure, the properties of proteins and peptides used to develop hydrogels, as well as their preparation methods are discussed. (springer.com)
  • Fisher SA, Baker AE, Shoichet MS (2017) Designing peptide and protein modified hydrogels: selecting the optimal conjugation strategy. (springer.com)
  • Because it is a not a biological extract, it provide a better control of the composition of cells' environment: control over growth factor incorporation, attachment factor incorporation, ECM protein incorporation, rigidity of the hydrogel. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • toughness
  • Bakarich SE, in het Panhuis M, Beirne S, Wallace GG, Spinks GM (2013) Extrusion printing of ionic-covalent entanglement hydrogels with high toughness. (springer.com)
  • The platelets act as cross-links to modify molecular functions to enable the hydrogels to have superior elasticity and toughness that resembles closely that of biological tissue. (wikipedia.org)
  • structure
  • A method as claimed in any one of the preceding claims wherein the ratio by volume of the hydrogel precursor solution to the coherent fibre structure is (20 to 70):1. (google.co.uk)
  • A kit of parts for producing a reinforced hydrogel product according to claims 11-12, the kit comprising a container of a hydrogel precursor solution (preferably sterilised) and a coherent fibrous structure (preferably sterilised), the fibres of the fibrous structure incorporating cations which are capable of cross-linking said hydrogel precursor to form a fibre reinforced hydrogel as the hydrogel product. (google.co.uk)
  • The combination of organic (polymer) and inorganic (clay) structure gives these hydrogels improved physical, chemical, electrical, biological, and swelling/de-swelling properties that cannot be achieved by either material alone. (wikipedia.org)
  • The structure of the hydrogel along with electrostatic attraction forces drive new bond formation through reconstructive covalent dangling side chain or non-covalent hydrogen bonding. (wikipedia.org)
  • In hydrogels, structure and stability of water molecules are highly affected by the bonds. (wikipedia.org)
  • NFC fiber network structure and dimensions in hydrogel resemble human ECM. (wikipedia.org)
  • responsive
  • The stimulus-sensitivity of hydrogels allow for a responsive release system where the hydrogels can be designed to deliver the drug in response to changes in condition of the body. (wikipedia.org)
  • network
  • Lin CC, Metters AT (2006) Hydrogels in controlled release formulations: network design and mathematical modeling. (springer.com)
  • Gong JP, Katsuyama Y, Kurokawa T, Osada Y (2003) Double-network hydrogels with extremely high mechanical strength. (springer.com)
  • behavior
  • Sharma K, Kaith BS, Kumar V, Kalia S, Kumar V, Swart HC (2014) Water retention and dye adsorption behavior of gg-cl-poly (acrylic acid-aniline) based conductive hydrogels. (springer.com)
  • Bernward AM, Kremer K, Holm C (2006) The swelling behavior of charged hydrogels. (springer.com)
  • properties
  • Inspired by flexible biological tissues, researchers incorporate carbon-based, polymeric, ceramic and/or metallic nanomaterials to give these hydrogels superior characteristics like optical properties and stimulus-sensitivity which can potentially be very helpful to medical (especially drug delivery and stem cell engineering) and mechanical fields. (wikipedia.org)