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  • hydrolysis
  • The aim of this study was to protect Plantago lanceolata extract from hydrolysis and to improve its antioxidant effect using self-nano-emulsifying drug delivery systems (SNEDDS). (mdpi.com)
  • The cyclization of 4-hydroxybutanesulfonic acid in aqueous solution proceeds particularly efficiently when heated with high-boiling, water-immiscible solvents (for example 1,2-dichlorobenzene or diethylbenzene, both boiling at about 180 °C) in which 1,4-butane-sultone dissolves and is thereby protected from hydrolysis in the aqueous medium. (wikipedia.org)
  • ammonium
  • Alchemists knew nitric acid as aqua fortis (strong water), as well as other nitrogen compounds such as ammonium salts and nitrate salts. (wikipedia.org)
  • stomach acid
  • Bile is produced in the liver to neutralise the stomach acid and emulsifies fats. (markedbyteachers.com)
  • Insufficient stomach acid production, a condition known as 'Hypochlorhydria', is partly a result of methylation problems. (amazonaws.com)
  • Insufficient stomach acid production can also be a result of insufficient Histidine (an amino acid) availability, the main regulator of stomach acid release, but also Zinc and TTP (Vitamin B1) deficiency. (amazonaws.com)
  • Some nutritionists are of the opinion that spinach is harder to digest than other vegetables, so if you have a problem with your stomach acid production and digestion in general, eating spinach regularly may not be such a good idea - it may be more sensible to stick to other vegetables. (amazonaws.com)
  • food
  • When the brain's 'association areas' match smells, sights, and even sounds of food with imprinted memories of eating, the nervous system signals the process to start. (icr.org)
  • After swallowing, an automated sensory-muscular system surrounding the esophagus senses the exact location of the food bolus. (icr.org)
  • Food is ground and dissolved into fine paste, but the stomach itself is protected from this harsh environment by an inner blanket of 'goblet' cells joined very tightly to each other to contain the acid. (icr.org)
  • The general principles of food processing are similar for a diversity of animals, so we can use the digestive system of mammals as a representative example. (blogspot.com)
  • Using the human digestive system as a model, let′s now follow a meal through the alimentary canal, examining in more detail what happens to the food in each of the processing stations along the way. (blogspot.com)
  • He began with a detailed explanation of how food travels through the system. (straight.com)
  • From the mouth, the food material moves down the esophagus, basically a tube, into the upper stomach -- the cardiac stomach -- where the food will stay for about an hour in a somewhat acid pH that can range from about 4 to 6. (reallywell.com)
  • There can be some gas and bloating from the spoiling food, and the resulting acids can irritate the stomach. (reallywell.com)
  • In the human digestive system, food enters the mouth and mechanical digestion of the food starts by the action of mastication (chewing), a form of mechanical digestion, and the wetting contact of saliva. (wikipedia.org)
  • potassium
  • In a 90-minute presentation, given as part of Naturopathic Medicine Week (which runs from May 3-9), Matsen took the audience on an entertaining tour of the digestive system before explaining how plants high in potassium cause unintended outcomes. (straight.com)
  • He stated that these high potassium levels are a signal to the kidneys not to transport vitamin D, preventing the absorption of calcium. (straight.com)
  • calcium
  • It's [calcium] not going to transport vitamin D into your body until activated by your kidneys," he said. (straight.com)
  • He found that limestone (calcium carbonate) could be heated or treated with acids to yield a gas he called "fixed air. (wikipedia.org)