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  • regenerative
  • Now, as a plastic surgeon and stem cell researcher, he believes that insights from creatures like zebrafish and salamanders, which routinely regrow damaged tails, limbs, jaws and even hearts, may one day endow humans with heightened regenerative abilities. (healthcanal.com)
  • In the last 10 to 15 years, as regenerative organisms like zebrafish have become genetically tractable to study in the lab, I became convinced that these animals might be able to teach us what is possible for human regeneration," Pomerantz said. (healthcanal.com)
  • Normally, a zebra fish's amputated tail fin completely regrows within 15 days (left) but the human tumor suppressor ARF largely blocks this regenerative ability (right). (healthcanal.com)
  • The research reflects a new approach to modeling the possibilities for human regeneration using highly regenerative organisms like the zebrafish. (healthcanal.com)
  • therapeutic
  • nevertheless, no study has evaluated the therapeutic effects of extracellular vesicles (EVs) obtained from human adipose tissue-derived MSCs (AD-MSC) on established airway remodeling in experimental allergic asthma. (biomedcentral.com)
  • 2(1) A person who is 18 years of age or over may direct that the whole body of the person, or any tissue or specified tissue from the body, may be used after the person's death for therapeutic purposes or for purposes of medical education or scientific research. (gov.mb.ca)
  • consent
  • The Act does not state who may consent to donations of human tissue in the case of living persons. (scielo.org.za)
  • 5 Only capable individuals may consent, refuse consent or withdraw consent for the purpose of this Act. (nslegislature.ca)
  • 6 (1) Any capable individual may, in a writing signed by the individual, consent to donate specific organs or tissues from the individual's living body. (nslegislature.ca)
  • These may be to discuss any need for consent, or to decide what happens to organs and tissue samples that may need to be removed for investigation. (hta.gov.uk)
  • The network's bioethics forum also warns that although biosamples, or any 'excess tissue' removed during operations must, by law, be discarded as 'biohazardous waste', anyone who has access to the discarded tissue might decide to export it to participate in a multibillion-dollar industry without appropriate consent. (timeslive.co.za)
  • If the deceased person has not indicated their consent (or refusal) to post mortem removal, storage or use of their body or tissue for scheduled purposes, nor appointed a nominated representative, then the appropriate consent can be given by someone in a 'qualifying relationship' to the deceased. (hta.gov.uk)
  • Medical school staff are sometimes faced with the challenge of deciding whether the consent given by potential donors, often many years before their death, is valid if it contains colloquial terminology and not the specific terms stated in the Human Tissue Act 2004 (the HT Act). (hta.gov.uk)
  • licence
  • An HTA licence is required if the human cellular material ('relevant material') to be stored for performance assessment has been removed from the deceased. (hta.gov.uk)
  • In certain circumstances, the Human Tissue Act 2004 makes provision for a Licence Holder or Designated Individual or Licence Applicant to make Representations against a proposed licensing decision and / or make an Appeal to the HTA about a licensing decision. (hta.gov.uk)
  • biology
  • An exhaustive understanding of the law, thorough understanding of human tissue biology and pathophysiology and an appreciation of the diversity of the areas covered in this field, is critical. (scielo.org.za)
  • organisms
  • DNA is found in the nucleus of all cells, and contains the genetic information for the development and working of living organisms including human beings. (hta.gov.uk)
  • genetic
  • The advantage of this method is that it provides genetic information before implantation of an embryo into the womb, making it possible to ensure that only tissue-matched embryos are transferred to the uterus. (scielo.org.za)
  • 1 In the 1980s, scientists successfully removed early embryonic cells from human embryos for genetic screening against debilitating conditions. (scielo.org.za)
  • The main advantage of PGD is that it provides genetic information before implantation of an embryo into the womb and can ensure that only embryos that are an exact tissue match are transferred to a woman's uterus. (scielo.org.za)
  • Anatomy
  • This unique CPD course has been specially designed for qualified and student health care professionals, who have an interest in learning more about the detailed workings of the human body and living anatomy. (eventbrite.co.uk)
  • include
  • Landmark scientific discoveries include the description, development and practical use of HLA tissue typing, 1-3 understanding of the role of antibodies in hyperacute rejection 4 and the use and application of immunosuppressive treatment to prevent graft rejection. (bmj.com)
  • This should include a full explanation of what the organs and tissue samples may be used for, and any benefits to the family of keeping tissue. (hta.gov.uk)
  • donors
  • To achieve this, it is proposed that donors should be rewarded more effectively, or a regulated market in human organs should be allowed. (scielo.org.za)
  • effectively
  • In this immunocompetent mouse model of allergic asthma, human AD-MSCs and EVs effectively reduced eosinophil counts in lung tissue and BALF and modulated airway remodeling, but their effects on T cells differed in lung and thymus. (biomedcentral.com)
  • An ideal therapy for asthma would effectively act not only on inflammation but also on airway remodeling. (biomedcentral.com)
  • material
  • My company stores and uses human cellular material for the mandatory assessment of diagnostic devices - does the Human Tissue Act 2004 affect our work? (hta.gov.uk)
  • A Bristol Heart Children Action Group was set up, and the group embarked on discussions with the hospital to find out how much human material had been kept from children who had died after cardiac surgery. (wikipedia.org)
  • physical
  • "unavailable" means unable to act because of death, physical or mental illness or incapacity, absence or other cause. (gov.mb.ca)
  • death
  • If the Pathologist certifies that they have a bearing on the cause of death, the Coroner may require that any retained organs and tissue blocks and slides are kept until the Coroner's function is complete. (hta.gov.uk)
  • Similarly if there is a possibility of criminal involvement in the death, tissue may be needed by the police as evidence, separate to the Coroner's requirements. (hta.gov.uk)
  • refuse
  • The Canadian Medical Association's Code Of Ethics maintains that medical personnel have a duty to "consider first the well-being of the patient" and "refuse to participate in or support practices that violate basic human rights. (avoiceformen.com)
  • make
  • It should also provide you with information to help you make decisions about what happens to organs and tissue samples that may need to be removed for investigation. (hta.gov.uk)
  • But Naidoo insisted that the government allow members of the Medical Rights Advocacy Network to act as independent monitors, to make sure that the foreskins were being correctly disposed of. (timeslive.co.za)