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  • therapies
  • CDPH will also monitor all research projects that are using assisted oocyte production (AOP) to harvest human eggs for research by collecting reporting forms from review committees overseeing research involving human oocyte retrieval for research or the development of medical therapies. (ca.gov)
  • research
  • To fulfill this intent, a diverse group of 13 national and international specialists were enlisted to serve on a Human Stem Cell Research (HSCR) Advisory Committee established to advise the Department in the development of statewide guidelines for human stem cell research and the update of these guidelines. (ca.gov)
  • The California Department of Public Health will monitor human stem cell research conducted within the State by collecting reporting forms from all Stem Cell Research Oversight (SCRO) Committees overseeing human embryonic stem cell research that is not fully funded by CIRM. (ca.gov)
  • Neurons
  • Investigators in Australia, Singapore, Israel, Canada and the United States, among others, soon reported that they had converted embryonic stem cells into neurons, immune cells and beating heart cells 7 . (nature.com)
  • The most common source has been adult skin cells called fibroblasts, which have been manipulated into stem cells and then neurons ( SN: 2/27/10, p. 5 ). (wired.com)
  • For example, lab experiments with cells from these collections might be used to study why motor neurons from people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis die, or how healthy liver cells respond to a promising but potentially toxic drug. (wired.com)
  • Stroke and traumatic brain injury lead to cell death, characterized by a loss of neurons and oligodendrocytes within the brain. (wikipedia.org)
  • regenerative
  • Chris Mason, a regenerative medicine expert at University College London said the greatest impact of iPS cell-liver buds might be in their use in improving drug development. (reuters.com)
  • Because they are reprogrammed adult cells, these stem cells share many of the same regenerative abilities as true embryonic stem cells but may not have as much versatility in the kinds of mature cells they can become. (wired.com)
  • There are various studies where the importance of these cells and their regenerative capacity has been demonstrated. (wikipedia.org)
  • This allows embryonic stem cells to be employed as useful tools for both research and regenerative medicine, because they can produce limitless numbers of themselves for continued research or clinical use. (wikipedia.org)
  • Marrow nucleated cells are used every day in regenerative orthopedics. (wikipedia.org)
  • He is Professor and Vice-Chair of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences and Professor of Cell Biology and Physiology at the University of Pittsburgh, where he is also Director of the Division of Developmental and Regenerative Medicine at the university's School of Medicine. (wikipedia.org)
  • researchers
  • However, because iPS can sometimes cause unexpected mutations in the cells, researchers have been seeking alternative methods. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Researchers around the world have been studying stem cells from various sources for more than a decade, hoping to capitalize on their ability to transform into a wide variety of other kinds of cell to treat a range of health conditions. (reuters.com)
  • When they transplanted them into mice, the researchers found the human liver buds matured, the human blood vessels connected to the mouse host's blood vessels and they began to perform many of the functions of mature human liver cells. (reuters.com)
  • Dieter Egli was just about to start graduate school in 1998 when researchers first worked out how to derive human embryonic stem cells. (nature.com)
  • It should be noted that no babies were born as a result of this research, and the researchers had no intention of producing a live cloned human being. (www.nhs.uk)
  • Researchers have been looking into ways of using a patient's own cells to create embryonic stem cells, as this would ensure that the genetic material in any cells used therapeutically would match the patient's DNA. (www.nhs.uk)
  • The researchers report that previous attempts to produce embryonic stem cells using this technique have failed, as the cells stopped dividing before they reached an advanced enough stage. (www.nhs.uk)
  • During their experiments, researchers identified two reasons for this inability to sufficiently grow the cells and developed techniques to overcome these limiting factors. (www.nhs.uk)
  • This study will no doubt be very exciting for researchers working with stem cells, but we're still a long way from the findings of this study being translated into new treatments for conditions such as Parkinson's disease or heart disease . (www.nhs.uk)
  • The researchers used a technique called somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) to transfer genetic material from adult human skin cells into a human egg cell in order to produce embryonic stem cells. (www.nhs.uk)
  • Researchers then optimised methods to prompt the egg cell to start and continue to divide using electricity and chemical compounds, including caffeine. (www.nhs.uk)
  • Researchers from Japan have reportedly used human stem cells to create functional human liver precursors similar to those found in fetuses, various media outlets reported on Wednesday. (redorbit.com)
  • Because taking blood is safe, fast and efficient compared to current stem cell harvesting methods, some of which include biopsies and pretreatments with drugs, researchers hope that blood-derived stem cells could one day be used to study and treat diseases - though major safety hurdles remain. (wired.com)
  • Researchers are still a long way off from transplanting such stem cells or their mature offspring into people safely. (wired.com)
  • Batches of cells can then be separated from the cell line and distributed to researchers. (virginia.edu)
  • Researchers say that if they can build a string of such successes in a range of animal models, they can make a stronger case for testing the cells in people. (scientificamerican.com)
  • The researchers found no sign of tumor growth in the brains of the healed rats or after stem cell injections into the bodies of healthy rats. (scientificamerican.com)
  • Some stem cell researchers are working to develop techniques of isolating stem cells that are as potent as embryonic stem cells, but do not require a human embryo. (wikipedia.org)
  • NYSCF established the first privately funded stem cell laboratory in New York City, where NYSCF researchers and scientific collaborators conduct advanced stem cell investigations. (wikipedia.org)
  • Specifically, the team removed the nucleus of an unfertilized egg cell and replaced it with the nucleus of another donor's egg cell, but, unlike the work of previous groups, the researchers lowered the temperature of the egg, increasing transfer success rate. (wikipedia.org)
  • China's distinctive attitude toward the embryo, combined with its lax regulatory system, could help its researchers leap the gap between laboratory science and medical application in stem cell therapy developments. (wikipedia.org)
  • By continuous intravital imaging in mice, researchers were able to explore the structure of the stem cell niche and to obtain the fate of individual stem cells (SCs) and their progeny over time in vivo. (wikipedia.org)
  • In January 2007, researchers at Wake Forest University reported that "stem cells drawn from amniotic fluid donated by pregnant women hold much of the same promise as embryonic stem cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • vitro
  • However, limited availability of such in vitro fertilization samples and the inability to perform mechanistic analyses in this type of model continue to hinder studies of peri-implantation human development. (rupress.org)
  • They showed that opposing gradients of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and Nodal, two transforming growth factor family members that act as morphogens, are sufficient to induce molecular and cellular mechanisms required to organize, in vivo or in vitro, uncommitted cells of the zebrafish blastula animal pole into a well-developed embryo. (wikipedia.org)
  • The word 'niche' can be in reference to the in vivo or in vitro stem-cell microenvironment. (wikipedia.org)
  • Five years later, the first successful human in vitro fertilization resulted in the birth of Louise Brown in England. (wikipedia.org)
  • nucleus
  • SCNT involves removing the nucleus of a donor cell and transferring it to an egg cell that has had its nucleus removed. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • SCNT involved taking the nucleus (the part of a cell containing most of the genetic information) from a person's skin cells, inserting its cells into a donor's unfertilised egg cell that had its nucleus removed. (www.nhs.uk)
  • The skin cell nucleus was then fused with the donor egg cell. (www.nhs.uk)
  • The process involves sucking out the nucleus of a somatic (body) cell and injecting it into an oocyte that has had its nucleus removed Using an approach based on the protocol outlined by Tachibana et al. (wikipedia.org)
  • Eukaryotic organisms (animals, plants, fungi and protists) store most of their DNA inside the cell nucleus and some of their DNA in organelles, such as mitochondria or chloroplasts. (wikipedia.org)
  • Oogonial nuclei contain randomly dispersed fibrillar and granular material whereas the somatic cells have a more condensed nucleus that creates a darker outline under the microscope. (wikipedia.org)
  • Osteoblasts (from the Greek combining forms for "bone", ὀστέο-, osteo- and βλαστάνω, blastanō "germinate") are cells with a single nucleus that synthesize bone. (wikipedia.org)
  • Fibroblasts
  • What's more, inducing fibroblasts to form stem cells can take about a month in the lab, during which mutations can accumulate. (wired.com)
  • hESCs can be generated by SCNT using dermal fibroblasts nuclei from both a middle-aged 35-year-old male and an elderly, 75-year-old male, suggesting that age-associated changes are not necessarily an impediment to SCNT-based nuclear reprogramming of human cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • ethical
  • However, because of ethical concerns, this event remains difficult to study in the human embryo. (rupress.org)
  • Is human cloning ethical? (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • His wide-ranging research established him as a leader in embryonic stem-cell biology, a field challenged by restricted funding and an enthusiasm for competing technologies that don't carry the same ethical baggage. (nature.com)
  • Regulatory issues are addressed in discussions of the ethical debate surrounding the derivation of human embryonic stem cells and the current policies governing their use in the United States and abroad, including the rules and conditions regulating federal funding and questions of intellectual property. (springer.com)
  • However, there remain ethical concerns over the implications of using SCNT to develop stem cells. (www.nhs.uk)
  • As a result of the increased interest in this field of research, in 2003, the People's Republic of China Ministry of Science and Technology and Ministry of Health issued official ethical guidelines for human embryonic stem cell research in its territories. (wikipedia.org)
  • The National Academies called for the establishment of Embryonic Stem Cell Research Oversight (ESCRO) Committees in its 2005 Guidelines for Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research to manage the ethical and legal concerns in human embryonic stem cell research. (wikipedia.org)
  • The composition of ESCRO committees was specified to include representatives of the public and people with expertise in developmental biology, stem cell research, molecular biology, assisted reproduction, and ethical and legal issues in human embryonic stem cell research. (wikipedia.org)
  • Research
  • A major breakthrough has just been achieved in stem cell research. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • The course would be applicable for those in industry aiming to work on stem research and bioprocessing. (ucl.ac.uk)
  • BD Biosciences: Diverse set of tools for stem cell research. (ucl.ac.uk)
  • The promise of an off-the-shelf liver seems much closer than one could hope even a year ago," said Dusko Illic, a stem cell expert at King's College London who was not directly involved in the research but praised its success. (reuters.com)
  • Malcolm Allison, a stem cell expert at Queen Mary University of London, who was not involved in the research, said the study's results offered "the distinct possibility of being able to create mini livers from the skin cells of a patient dying of liver failure" and transplant them to boost the failing organ. (reuters.com)
  • That livers and other organs may one day be made from iPS cells is an "exciting" prospect, said Matthew Smalley of Cardiff University's European Cancer Stem Cell Research Institute. (reuters.com)
  • They soon recognized the research potential of these intriguing entities, which can both replicate themselves and be nudged into becoming any of the body's 200-plus cell types 3 , 4 . (nature.com)
  • In 2001, US President George W. Bush restricted government funding to research on just a few existing ES-cell lines. (nature.com)
  • The decision effectively forced those intent on carrying out the research in the United States to seek private or state funding , and often to create duplicate laboratories - one for ES-cell research and another for work funded by the US federal government. (nature.com)
  • Although there is great interest in the potential for using stem cells as cell replacements and other treatments for diseases that currently have no cure, research on the biology of human embryonic stem cells is still in its infancy. (springer.com)
  • These headlines are based on newly published research into the use of a technique known as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) as part of embryonic stem cell research. (www.nhs.uk)
  • This research is the first time the technique has been successful using human cells. (www.nhs.uk)
  • Media coverage of this study was as varied as people's feelings are about stem cell research. (www.nhs.uk)
  • Dr. Matthew Smalley , a senior lecturer at Cardiff University's European Cancer Stem Cell Research Institute who was not involved in the study, told Lopatto the research "holds out real promise for a viable alternative approach to human organ transplants. (redorbit.com)
  • The potential of embryonic stem cell research. (virginia.edu)
  • To create embryonic stem cells for research, a 'stem cell line' must be created from the inner cell mass of a week-old embryo. (virginia.edu)
  • To fulfill this intent, a diverse group of 13 national and international specialists were enlisted to serve on a Human Stem Cell Research (HSCR) Advisory Committee established to advise the Department in the development of statewide guidelines for human stem cell research and the update of these guidelines. (ca.gov)
  • The California Department of Public Health will monitor human stem cell research conducted within the State by collecting reporting forms from all Stem Cell Research Oversight (SCRO) Committees overseeing human embryonic stem cell research that is not fully funded by CIRM. (ca.gov)
  • Studies of human brain development are critical as research on neurological disorders have been progressively advanced. (hindawi.com)
  • However, the derivation of such cell types from ESs is not without obstacles and hence current research is focused on overcoming these barriers. (wikipedia.org)
  • For many decades, stem cells have played an important role in medical research, beginning in 1868 when Ernst Haeckel first used the phrase to describe the fertilized egg which eventually gestates into an organism. (wikipedia.org)
  • This paved the way for Mario Capecchi, Martin Evans, and Oliver Smithies to create the first knockout mouse, ushering in a whole new era of research on human disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • Great levels of success and potential have been realized from research using adult stem cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Political leaders are debating how to regulate and fund research studies that involve the techniques used to remove the embryo cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • The New York Stem Cell Foundation (NYSCF) is an American 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, founded in the Spring of 2005, with the mission "accelerating cures for the major diseases of our time through stem cell research. (wikipedia.org)
  • The foundation supports stem cell scientists through the NYSCF Innovator Program, and it engages the academic, medical, pharmaceutical, and biotechnology communities by hosting the annual translational stem cell research conference and other symposia throughout the year. (wikipedia.org)
  • The foundation focuses on three areas: NYSCF Research and Laboratory - Supports non-government funded advanced stem cell research, in the NYSCF Research Institute laboratory and through collaborations with medical research institutions worldwide. (wikipedia.org)
  • NYSCF awards an annual prize to honor the most significant achievement in translational stem cell research. (wikipedia.org)
  • NYSCF Conference and Symposia - Convenes the annual translational stem cell research conference and on-going programs for scientists, policymakers and the public. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2006, NYSCF established its own laboratory, which is now one of the largest private stem cell laboratories in the United States, now referred to as The NYSCF Research Institute. (wikipedia.org)
  • NYSCF channels private philanthropy toward stem cell research. (wikipedia.org)
  • NYSCF has raised nearly $100 million for stem cell research both in its own laboratory and in the major medical institutions around the world that it continues to support. (wikipedia.org)
  • The laws and policies regarding stem cell research in the People's Republic of China are relatively relaxed in comparison to that of other nations. (wikipedia.org)
  • China has one of the most unrestrictive embryonic stem cell research policies in the world. (wikipedia.org)
  • In recent years, seeing the research opportunities that China's lax regulations provide, many expatriate Chinese scientists from the West are returning to China to establish stem cell research centers and laboratories there. (wikipedia.org)
  • American scientific journals Science and Nature have both reported in recent years that China's stem cell programs hold potential, and in 2004 a delegation from Britain's Department of Trade and Industry concluded more emphatically that Chinese research in the field was already world-class. (wikipedia.org)
  • Funding for stem cell research by the Chinese government is extremely limited compared to Western nations, with the Chinese Ministry of Science and Technology planning to devote between US$33 million and US$132 million on stem cell research during the next 5 years. (wikipedia.org)
  • By contrast, the state of California alone has earmarked US$3 billion to fund stem cell research at California institutions during the next decade. (wikipedia.org)
  • Perhaps more importantly, the cultural and national attitude on stem cell research differs greatly between China and the West. (wikipedia.org)
  • Stem cell research in China thus is unlikely ever to be prone to the intense moral politicking that characterizes the field in the West. (wikipedia.org)
  • CS1 maint: Uses editors parameter (link) Kerstin Klein, Illiberal Biopolitics and 'Embryonic Life': The Governance of Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research in China. (wikipedia.org)
  • Of note, this may be one of the reasons that commercially available centrifuge systems that concentrate marrow nucleated cells have not shown as much promise in animal research for cartilage repair as have approaches where MSC's are expanded in culture to greater numbers. (wikipedia.org)
  • Research is underway to develop various sources for stem cells, and to apply stem-cell treatments for neurodegenerative diseases and conditions such as diabetes, heart disease, and other conditions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Research has been conducted on the effects of stem cells on animal models of brain degeneration, such as in Parkinson's, Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Alzheimer's disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • At Adelaide, Rathjen headed a research group looking at embryonic stem cells and protein signals which determine the final type of cells to be formed. (wikipedia.org)
  • Here he was also director of the Integrated Microscopy Resource and Senior Scientist at the Wisconsin National Primate Research Center and at the Waisman Center for Human Development. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2000, the NIH, under the administration of President Bill Clinton, issued "guidelines that allow federal funding of embryonic stem-cell research. (wikipedia.org)
  • At this point, the Congress intervened and passed the Dickey-Wicker Amendment in 1995 (the final bill, which included the Dickey Amendment, was signed into law by Bill Clinton) which prohibited any federal funding for the Department of Health and Human Services be used for research that resulted in the destruction of an embryo regardless of the source of that embryo. (wikipedia.org)
  • No federal law ever did ban stem cell research in the United States, but only placed restrictions on funding and use, under Congress's power to spend. (wikipedia.org)
  • In February 2001, George W. Bush requested a review of the NIH's guidelines, and after a policy discussion within his circle of supporters, implemented a policy in August of that year to limit the number of embryonic stem cell lines that could be used for research. (wikipedia.org)
  • In April 2004, 206 members of Congress, including many moderate Republicans, signed a letter urging President Bush to expand federal funding of embryonic stem cell research beyond what Bush had already supported. (wikipedia.org)
  • On July 29, 2005, Senate Majority Leader William H. Frist (R-TN), announced that he too favored loosening restrictions on federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. (wikipedia.org)
  • On July 18, 2006, the Senate passed three different bills concerning stem cell research. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cell Research (2008) 18:s39. (wikipedia.org)
  • Because of the complexity and novelty of many of the issues involved in that research, the Guidelines committee believes that all research institutions engaged in human embryonic stem cell research should create and maintain these committees at the local level. (wikipedia.org)
  • The composition and responsibilities of ESCRO committees was further clarified in the Amendments to the National Academies' Guidelines for Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research, released in February 2007. (wikipedia.org)
  • The National Academies' Guidelines make clear that activities related to human embryonic stem cell research should be overseen by an ESCRO committee. (wikipedia.org)
  • Guidelines for Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research 2007 Amendments to the National Academies' Guidelines for Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research 2007 Amendments Hanna, K.E. (2007). (wikipedia.org)
  • 2007). Establishing institutional oversight for human embryonic stem cell research: Creating an ESCRO Committee. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2007). Establishing procedures for institutional oversight of stem cell research. (wikipedia.org)
  • Stanford University
  • Stanford University stem cell biologist Marius Wernig points out that the new method is still less efficient than the fibroblast technique. (wired.com)
  • This is really exciting, just to overcome this obstacle of tumorigenicity,' says Stanford University stem cell biologist Marcel Daadi, a co-author of the study. (scientificamerican.com)
  • Developmental Biology
  • He graduated with an A.B. in Zoology from the University of California, Berkeley in 1971, where he also obtained his Ph.D. in Cell and Developmental Biology. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1997-2001: Professor and Vice-Chair of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the Oregon Health & Science University and Professor of Cell and Developmental Biology. (wikipedia.org)
  • primordial germ
  • In spermatogenesis, c-KIT is expressed in primordial germ cells, spermatogonia, and in primordial oocytes. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is also expressed in the primordial germ cells of females. (wikipedia.org)
  • During foetal development gonocytes develop from primordial germ cells and following this SSCs develop from gonocytes in the testis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Oogonia are formed in large numbers by mitosis early in fetal development from primordial germ cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • This is where the primordial germ cells collect. (wikipedia.org)
  • This is in contrast to male primordial germ cells which are arrested in the spermatogonial stage at birth and do not enter into spermatogenesis and meiosis to produce primary spermatocytes until puberty in the adult male. (wikipedia.org)
  • diseases
  • Such stem cells can regenerate and replace those damaged cells and tissues and alleviate diseases that affect millions of people. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • SCNT has been used to clone animals before, and is thought to have potential applications in the study and treatment of human diseases. (www.nhs.uk)
  • But even if the cells won't be put directly into patients, Jaenisch says that the new method "opens up access to enormous resources of collected cells from patients" that can be used to study diseases. (wired.com)
  • But the ongoing scientific challenge is to harness those cells' ability to morph into the different adult cell types and thereby develop new treatments for debilitating diseases such as stroke, which strikes about 700,000 Americans every year, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (scientificamerican.com)
  • Interestingly, iPSCs derived from patients, containing donor genetic background, have offered a breakthrough approach to study human genetics of neurodegenerative diseases. (hindawi.com)
  • These stem cells developed from a singular patient would also be able to be used to produce cells affected in the above mentioned diseases. (wikipedia.org)