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  • hazards
  • This activity sheet outlines the hazards that apply to any response and recovery worker involved in recovering human remains and transferring them to a mortuary service facility for identification. (osha.gov)
  • The Matrix captures major activities involved in hurricane response and recovery, highlights many of the hazards associated with them, and recommends beneficial work practices, personal protective equipment (PPE), and other exposure control methods. (osha.gov)
  • The following information is intended to provide a general overview of potential inhalation hazards during hurricane cleanup. (ohsonline.com)
  • Use of a properly qualified contractor to handle and remove common cleanup hazards may be necessary to minimize exposures and resulting adverse health effects. (ohsonline.com)
  • Such a surveillance program will help CDC and state and local public health officials refine the guidelines for exposure avoidance, personal protection, and clean-up and assist health departments to identify unrecognized hazards. (cdc.gov)
  • To apply and advance methods for human health risk modeling to predict hazards and risks for individual chemicals, defined mixtures, and environmental mixtures. (sra.org)
  • Research demonstrates that vulnerability is registered not by exposure to hazards (perturbations and stresses) alone but also resides in the sensitivity and resilience of the system experiencing such hazards. (pnas.org)
  • These small non-coding ribose nucleic acids function to regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level and have been shown to participate in multiple disease pathways including cancer, heart disease, apoptosis, as well as immune responses to microbial hazards and occupational allergens. (frontiersin.org)
  • Earthquakes, tsunamis, hurricanes, volcano eruptions and tornados have been the causes of many devastating World Conference on Natural Disaster Reduction, Technical Committee Session C: In the first part of this document, four authors give presentations on the Natural Hazards: Causes and Effects Study Guide for Disaster Management Prepared by Don Schramm and Robert Dries To be used in conjunction with Natural Hazards Natural Hazards and Natural Disasters. (firstour.pt)
  • disasters
  • The arts bring people together and can help families and communities cope with and recover from natural or human-caused disasters. (nih.gov)
  • This position offers excellent exposure to inter-/trans-disciplinary team science, integrating data and expertise across the source-to-outcome continuum to address the critical emerging risk of catastrophic chemical contamination events caused by natural and man-made disasters. (sra.org)
  • Essay The total deaths caused by natural disasters last year was 9,656 human conflicts or the effects of a disaster, Institute of Hazard, Risk and An easy-to-understand overview of the causes, symptoms, and treatment of children who have experienced a natural or man-made disaster. (firstour.pt)
  • 1 Elements of a major chemical Every year, millions of people are affected by both human-caused and natural disasters. (firstour.pt)
  • through dissemination of micro-organism or toxins in food or water or insect vector or by aerosol to harm human population, food crops and livestock to cause Biological disasters define the devastating effects caused by an enormous spread of a certain kind of living organism - that may the spread a disease, virus, or an epidemic. (firstour.pt)
  • Indirect effects of warmer temperatures include weakening human immune systems after droughts or flooding, and disruptions to the health care system following disasters such as hurricanes and floods. (medicalxpress.com)
  • carbon monoxide exposure
  • Visits were included if "carbon monoxide exposure" or "carbon monoxide poisoning" was listed as the chief complaint and/or ICD-9-CM code 986 was listed as either a working or a final diagnosis. (cdc.gov)
  • He has also prepared engineering reports and provided testimony as an expert witness on behalf of fuel companies, equipment manufacturers, and others on issues that include combustion forensics, product liability, carbon monoxide exposure, fires, fuel oil leaks, equipment malfunctions, soot damage, and personal injury. (lawsonline.com)
  • Impacts
  • The newly established Texas A&M University Superfund Research Center ( https://superfund.tamu.edu/ ) investigates the impacts of environmental emergency-related contamination events, such as those that occurred after Hurricanes Harvey and Irma. (sra.org)
  • A central lesson of this work recognizes that a focus limited to perturbations and stressors is insufficient for understanding the impacts on and responses of the affected system or its components ( 15 - 17 ). (pnas.org)
  • Numerous other trends are addressed with regard to technology, emissions controls, vehicle operations, emission measurements, impacts on exposure, and impacts on public health. (thisisms.com)
  • Findings
  • Recent findings include the increased growth of allergenic plants in response to higher carbon dioxide levels and warmer temperatures. (springer.com)
  • These findings underscore the need for effective prevention messages during storm preparation, warnings, and response periods regarding the correct use of generators and the installation and maintenance of battery-powered CO detectors. (cdc.gov)
  • NIEHS
  • NIEHS research uses state-of-the-art science and technology to investigate the interplay between environmental exposures, human biology, genetics, and common diseases to help prevent disease and improve human health. (nih.gov)
  • The vision of the NIEHS is to use environmental health sciences to understand human disease and improve human health. (nih.gov)
  • The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) is expanding and accelerating its contributions to scientific knowledge of human health and the environment, and to the health and well-being of people everywhere. (nih.gov)
  • NIEHS sponsored a table-top disaster response exercise April 7 in Los Angeles in order to prepare researchers to take action in case of a tsunami. (nih.gov)
  • NOTE: The NIEHS will be holding an informational meeting at the Battle House in Mobile, Alabama on November 23 for those interested in submitting an application in response to this FOA. (nih.gov)
  • formaldehyde
  • To cite one infamous example, people exposed to the known carcinogen formaldehyde in FEMA trailers after Hurricane Katrina suffered headaches, nosebleeds and difficulty breathing. (inthesetimes.com)
  • formaldehyde levels found in some travel trailers and mobile homes were higher than typical U.S. indoor levels, and at levels found in some trailers and mobile homes, formaldehyde exposure could affect health. (cdc.gov)
  • CDC recommended that FEMA relocate residents before the temperatures in the region increased, with priority given to occupants suffering symptoms potentially attributable to formaldehyde exposure, and to vulnerable populations such as children, elderly persons, and persons with chronic respiratory illnesses, and persons living in trailer types that have higher formaldehyde levels. (cdc.gov)
  • fungal
  • When mold spores are present in abnormally high quantities, they can present especially hazardous health risks to humans after prolonged exposure, including allergic reactions or poisoning by mycotoxins , or causing fungal infection ( mycosis ). (wikipedia.org)
  • Other problems are respiratory and/or immune system responses including respiratory symptoms, respiratory infections, exacerbation of asthma, and rarely hypersensitivity pneumonitis , allergic alveolitis, chronic rhinosinusitis and allergic fungal sinusitis . (wikipedia.org)
  • Infants may develop respiratory symptoms as a result of exposure to a specific type of fungal mold, called Penicillium . (wikipedia.org)
  • Fungal bioaerosols are ubiquitous in the environment and human exposure can result in a variety of health effects ranging from systemic, subcutaneous, and cutaneous infections to respiratory morbidity including allergy, asthma, and hypersensitivity pneumonitis. (frontiersin.org)
  • Recent research has focused on the role of microRNAs (miRNAs) following fungal exposure and is overlooked, yet important, group of regulators capable of influencing fungal immune responses through a variety of cellular mechanisms. (frontiersin.org)
  • Interestingly, the few studies have assessed that the miRNA profiles following fungal exposure have identified the same critical miRNAs that have been characterized in other inflammatory-mediated and allergy-induced experimental models. (frontiersin.org)
  • To assist in navigating this rapidly evolving field, the aim of this review is to describe miRNAs in the framework of host recognition mechanisms and provide initial insight into the regulatory pathways in response to fungal exposure. (frontiersin.org)
  • vectors
  • Exposure to ticks and mosquitoes is the single greatest risk factor for emerging vector borne diseases , and the introduction of these vectors to new geographic areas has been a key contributing factor in the emergence of these diseases. (medicalxpress.com)
  • Climate change can shape the rates of emerging disease by various processes including a direct effect on mosquito and tick vectors, and indirect effects on human vulnerability to emerging VBDs . (medicalxpress.com)
  • The environments characteristic of most suburban residential properties are enticing habitat for these vectors, which might explain why more ticks and human infections with emerging VBDs are increasingly reported from residential areas. (medicalxpress.com)
  • Many scientists consider this indirect mechanism, where exceptional climatic conditions affect people's behavior and increase exposure to vectors, to explain much of how climate change affects the spread of emerging VBDs. (medicalxpress.com)
  • Populations
  • Public health officials use emerging vector-borne diseases (VBDs) in this context to refer to diseases or pathogenic agents transmitted by mosquitoes and ticks that have recently entered human populations for the first time. (medicalxpress.com)
  • toxic
  • Studies have shown that people who are atopic (sensitive), already suffer from allergies , asthma , or compromised immune systems and occupy damp or moldy buildings are at an increased risk of health problems such as inflammatory and toxic responses to mold spores, metabolites and other components. (wikipedia.org)
  • If I were to count all the toxic garbage that we are exposed to then that would take me a very looong time indeed and the list will never be complete because every day we humans are adding more toxic stuff to the list. (infiniteunknown.net)
  • It will shape how government agencies regulate chemicals for decades to come: how toxic waste sites are cleaned up, how pesticides are regulated, how workers are protected from toxic exposure and what chemicals are permitted in household items. (inthesetimes.com)
  • dispersants
  • The toxicity of the combined oil and dispersants and their effect on human health has yet to be determined. (wordpress.com)
  • In addition to the potential for exposure to oil, dispersants and other chemical mixtures, residents in the Gulf region are experiencing economic hardship, job loss, resettlements and other forms of psychological distress which may all adversely impact health and quality of life. (nih.gov)
  • pathways
  • Real-time imaging of the living human brain during different behavioral states has promoted our understanding of the links between human behavior and basic neurochemical processes or specific neuroanatomic pathways. (nih.gov)
  • The primary and secondary effects of the stress response constitute the biologic pathways along which a person's experiences, living and working conditions, interpersonal relations, lifestyle, diet, personality traits, and general socioeconomic status can affect the body. (nih.gov)
  • harm
  • Vulnerability is the degree to which a system, subsystem, or system component is likely to experience harm due to exposure to a hazard, either a perturbation or stress/stressor. (pnas.org)
  • Physiological
  • A characteristic set of physiological effects-the "stress response" -has been identified and investigated in humans and animals ( Chrousos, 1998 ). (nih.gov)
  • The stress response consists of many coadapted and simultaneous shifts in the physiological functioning of the cardiovascular, respiratory, muscular, metabolic, immune, and central nervous systems. (nih.gov)
  • Physiological changes can be accompanied by altered emotional responses, enhanced vigilance, heightened appraisal of risk, enhanced memory storage and retrieval, and changes in motivation. (nih.gov)
  • asthma
  • In North Carolina, a reported increase in persons presenting with asthma symptoms was postulated to be caused by exposure to mold ( 2 ). (cdc.gov)
  • Studies have shown that a correlation exists between the probability of developing asthma and increased exposure to Penicillium . (wikipedia.org)
  • Dr. Alexis leads the Sample Acquisition and Repository Core for the University of North Carolina Center for Environmental Medicine, Asthma and Lung Biology, where he uses induced sputum to study inflammation in the lung associated with air pollution exposure, in close collaboration with the Environmental Protection Agency. (asthmaallergieschildren.com)
  • Dr. Ellis and Dr. North have established a birth cohort in Kingston, Ontario, of approximately 400 mother/child pairs, to examine the connection between environmental exposures and the developmental origins of asthma/allergies. (asthmaallergieschildren.com)
  • Persons
  • This report describes the results of that analysis, which indicated that one data source, Texas poison centers, received reports of 54 persons with storm-related CO exposures during the surveillance period. (cdc.gov)
  • respiratory
  • Finally, increased exposure to smoke and particles from wild fires, resulting from heat waves, will contribute to the general increase in respiratory disease. (springer.com)
  • Increasing hurricane activity means a continuing need for respiratory protection. (ohsonline.com)
  • Another study found that these respiratory symptoms were positively associated with exposure to water damaged homes, exposure included being inside without participating in clean up. (wikipedia.org)
  • dose-response
  • These include use of computational and probabilistic dose-response methods to improve upon existing toxicity values, working with the Center's Exposure Science Core to convert between environmental concentrations and population exposures, working with the Center's Data Science Core to develop computational read-across approaches, and supporting economic impact modeling conducted by collaborators at the University of North Carolina. (sra.org)
  • Foundational RH models ( Fig. 1 ) sought to understand the impact of a hazard as a function of exposure to the hazard event and the dose-response (sensitivity) of the entity exposed ( 18 , 19 ). (pnas.org)
  • Molds
  • The vast majority of molds are not hazardous to humans, and reaction to molds can vary between individuals with relatively minor allergic reactions being the most common. (wikipedia.org)
  • deaths
  • Only poison center calls and deaths associated with CO exposures deemed to be unintentional were included in this analysis. (cdc.gov)
  • In addition to providing poison center call data, TDSHS also provided CDC with information on storm-related deaths with CO exposure listed as the cause of death. (cdc.gov)
  • environmental
  • In particular, Center project teams will work to measure "known-unknown" or "unknown-unknown" contaminants in and around the Houston/Galveston Bay area, expanding the current understanding of environmental exposures. (sra.org)
  • Research on global environmental change has significantly improved our understanding of the structure and function of the biosphere and the human impress on both ( 1 ). (pnas.org)
  • It directs attention to such questions as: Who and what are vulnerable to the multiple environmental and human changes underway, and where? (pnas.org)
  • How are these changes and their consequences attenuated or amplified by different human and environmental conditions? (pnas.org)
  • temperatures
  • Emberlin J, Detandt M, Gehrig R, Jaeger S, Nolard N, Rantio-Lehtimäki A. Responses in the start of Betula (birch) pollen seasons to recent changes in spring temperatures across Europe. (springer.com)
  • In 2006, sea surface temperatures of Atlantic waters, where many hurricanes form, were a record 1.7 degrees above the 1901-1970 average. (ohsonline.com)
  • risk
  • During power outages after hurricanes, survivors can be at risk for carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning if they use portable generators improperly ( 1 ). (cdc.gov)
  • New areas of risk management began to emerge in the 1990s, providing managers with more options to protect their companies against new kinds of exposures. (encyclopedia.com)
  • diseases
  • In some cases these diseases have historically been present in humans but have increased in frequency, geographic range or both. (medicalxpress.com)
  • natural
  • According to a recent study by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), global warming accounted for about half of the hurricane-fueling warmth in Atlantic waters, while natural cycles were a smaller factor. (ohsonline.com)
  • studies
  • This article does not contain any studies with human or animal subjects performed by any of the authors. (springer.com)
  • Evidence
  • For this analysis, a storm-related CO exposure was defined as evidence of inhalation of CO (e.g., self-reported activation of a CO detector) that was related to the storm. (cdc.gov)
  • Stress
  • The stress response is a rapid and pervasive adjustment of internal states to prepare an organism to adapt to a threat-to respond to the rigors of "fight or flight" ( Chrousos, 1998 ). (nih.gov)
  • Many aspects of the stress response, however, are inappropriate or maladaptive in the context of modern postindustrial societies. (nih.gov)
  • Nevertheless, the ancient physiologic stress response is triggered when one experiences, for example, a threat to social position, damage to important interpersonal relationships, loss of possessions, or barriers to the achievement of goals. (nih.gov)
  • levels
  • Exposure to high levels of mycotoxins can lead to neurological problems and in some cases death. (wikipedia.org)
  • the levels measured probably under-represented long-term exposures since levels tend to be higher in newly constructed travel trailers and during warmer weather. (cdc.gov)
  • potential
  • Aremu DA, Madejczyk MS, Ballatori N. N-acetylcysteine as a potential antidote and biomonitoring agent of methylmercury exposure. (autism.com)
  • builds
  • The emergence of "sustainability science" ( 2 - 4 ) builds toward an understanding of the human-environment condition with the dual objectives of meeting the needs of society while sustaining the life support systems of the planet. (pnas.org)
  • I'm talking about an ongoing low level of exposure that builds up over time, not an emergency level at any one time. (infiniteunknown.net)
  • vulnerability
  • This recognition requires revisions and enlargements in the basic design of vulnerability assessments, including the capacity to treat coupled human-environment systems and those linkages within and without the systems that affect their vulnerability. (pnas.org)
  • The vulnerability of coupled human-environment systems is one of the central elements of this dialogue and sustainability research ( 6 , 9 - 11 ). (pnas.org)
  • Answers to these and related questions require conceptual frameworks that account for the vulnerability of coupled human-environment systems with diverse and complex linkages. (pnas.org)
  • chronic
  • Instead, contemporary humans face ill-defined, diffuse, often chronic threats that cannot be resolved by fight or flight. (nih.gov)
  • study
  • During this second investigation at the site, Hurricane Andrew destroyed much of the facility and the surrounding community, thus limiting the study. (cdc.gov)
  • Residents
  • CDC also recommended that while residents await relocation they take certain steps to reduce exposure, such as spending time outdoors and maintaining indoor temperature at the lowest comfortable level. (cdc.gov)