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  • genetic
  • This is hailed as a genetic breakthrough for mammal cloning. (infoplease.com)
  • Nobel Prize-winning geneticist Joshua Lederberg advocated cloning and genetic engineering in an article in The American Naturalist in 1966 and again, the following year, in The Washington Post . (wikipedia.org)
  • And while the document supports somatic cell gene therapy -- that is, in cells other than reproductive cells -- it comes down against genetic modifications of the reproductive cell lines 'in the present state of research' because they are too risky and would be transmitted to potential offspring. (scientificamerican.com)
  • After all, argue proponents, if an infertile couple desires to pass on their genetic inheritance by producing clones of one or both partners, shouldn't they be able to exercise their right of choice in the newly emerging biotech marketplace? (alternet.org)
  • Moreover, we are told not to be overly concerned, because even though the clone will have the exact same genetic makeup as the original, it will develop differently because its social and environmental context will be different from that of the donor. (alternet.org)
  • The concept of producing these sheep-human hybrids for the purpose of organ farming may appear enticing at first, but these developments have the potential to have large effects even outside the medical community… In 1996, genetic engineers managed to produce the first successful clone of a mammal: Dolly the sheep. (physiciansforlife.org)
  • At other times, embryos are frozen in order to be transferred into a surrogate mother who carries the pregnancy to term for another couple, or to give sufficient time for genetic examination of some of the embryonic cells for the purpose of transferring only high quality embryos through the elimination of those found defective, or lastly in order to store valuable living ceils for experimental use or other instrumental purposes. (physiciansforlife.org)
  • The new technologies of human genetic engineering are among the most consequential technologies ever developed. (geneticsandsociety.org)
  • We strongly urge as well that the United States join with other countries, under the auspices of the United Nations, to work towards an international convention that would ban dangerous applications of the new genetic technologies, while encouraging the many applications judged to contribute to the improvement of human well-being. (geneticsandsociety.org)
  • The Bush stem cell lines were derived more than eight years ago using old-fashioned techniques and have since then accrued many serious genetic abnormalities. (thehastingscenter.org)
  • As a noun, a clone is an identical genetic copy of either a piece of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), a cell, or a whole organism. (encyclopedia.com)
  • As a verb, "to clone" means to produce identical genetic copies of either pieces of DNA, cells, or whole organisms. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Typically, along with genetic engineering and cloning, these technologies constitute the kind of 21st century advances that make this the century of Biology. (stemcellclinic.net)
  • An alternative is to take the stem cells from embryos that carry a genetic defect for specific diseases. (fightaging.org)
  • Those cells could regenerate, for example, spinal-cord cells that are a patient's identical genetic match, cells that, in theory, wouldn't be rejected by the immune system. (seattletimes.com)
  • 2002
  • The New York Times reported March 16 that lawmakers in at least six states were considering bills similar to the 2002 legislation in California authorizing research for therapeutic cloning of embryonic stem cells. (ethicsdaily.com)
  • Here are some text from the company called Clonaid and they blatantly told you that they have cloned people from 2002. (auricmedia.net)
  • I'm glad his interest in cloning is being revealed now, since he was a pioneer in his views about it back in 2002 and his fans ought to know about it. (auricmedia.net)
  • The announcement, which came after more than a year of study, reinforces a vote taken by the German parliament in 2002 that outlaws cloning. (dw.com)
  • The National Ethics Council had been set the task of investigating the nature of stem cell research by Chancellor Gerhard Schröder in late 2002. (dw.com)
  • In 2002, a bizarre sect of spaceship-worshipping Raelians claimed that "Baby Eve," the clone, had already been born. (whyfiles.org)
  • The study leader and iPS cell pioneer, Shinya Yamanaka, has told me he was inspired by a nonfederally funded study conducted at Harvard in 2002 in which somatic cells were fused to human embryonic stem cells and subsequently began to develop pluripotent characteristics. (thehastingscenter.org)
  • There is every indication that 2002 will be the year of the clones," said Panos Zavos, boldly. (discovermagazine.com)
  • Catholics
  • Though many Christian denominations are opposed to the cloning of embryonic cells, Catholics, who believe in the sanctity of life even in the unfertilized human egg, have been the most vocal about the issue. (synonym.com)
  • Roman Catholics, evangelicals and many mainline Protestant churches oppose cloning for a variety of reasons. (nytimes.com)
  • opposition
  • The first principle is well known for driving opposition to abortion and embryonic stem cell research. (scientificamerican.com)
  • But for many in Congress, and in the scientific community and the biotech industry as well, opposition is solely based on the fact that the cloning technique is still unsafe and could pose a risk of producing a malformed baby. (alternet.org)
  • What unites social conservatives and progressives on cloning issues is their commitment to the intrinsic value of life and their opposition to what they perceive to be a purely utilitarian perspective on biotech issues. (alternet.org)
  • Both groups come together in opposition to cloning -- but for different reasons. (alternet.org)
  • The Catholic Church, in particular, has voiced strong opposition against cloning. (synonym.com)
  • make
  • While embryonic stem cell research is 'a grave moral disorder,' the document notes that parents may make use of a 'vaccine which was developed using cell lines of illicit origin' when the health of a child is at stake as long as they voice their disapproval and request alternatives. (scientificamerican.com)
  • That they are just clones, elites clones to make money for them They can be scrapped and placed with a new one if they don't dance with their pipes. (auricmedia.net)
  • A moratorium would allow time for alternatives to research cloning to be investigated, for policy makers and the public to make informed judgments, and for regulatory structures to be established to oversee applications that society might decide are acceptable. (geneticsandsociety.org)
  • to use cloning to make a new animal. (whyfiles.org)
  • This firm is working on genetically educating cows to make human antibodies (see #1 in the bibliography ) in their milk. (whyfiles.org)
  • One of the headaches for the advocates of NT-hESC is that potentially each advance in making NT-hESC (therapeutic cloning) could unintentionally also make it easier for some crazy folks to try to actually clone a person (reproductive cloning or "Star Wars" type cloning). (ipscell.com)
  • On the other hand, some Christians cite the teachings of Jesus and say that cloning could be the way to heal the sick and make the blind see. (synonym.com)
  • I hope that whatever the outcome is with stem cell research that we can find a way to pass a complete ban on human cloning to make clear that this should be illegal. (votesmart.org)
  • The panel's chair -- Dr. Leon Kass, a bioethicist on leave from the University of Chicago who is now affiliated with the conservative think tank American Enterprise Institute --said that the panel will not rush to make a recommendation on cloning regulations, despite the fact that the Senate is scheduled to debate legislation banning the procedure this spring. (californiahealthline.org)
  • clonal human embryos
  • They are also concerned about the increasing bioindustrialization of life by the scientific community and life science companies and are shocked that clonal human embryos have been patented and declared to be human inventions. (alternet.org)
  • vitro
  • Human embryos, conceived in vitro and in numbers exceeding the possibility of simultaneous transfer into the mother's body (so-called 'surplus' embryos), are frozen to allow for possible repetition of the embryo transfer in the not infrequent case of failure on the first attempt or in those cases where it is postponed. (physiciansforlife.org)
  • But the success of an in vitro procedure is far from guaranteed, especially when the mother is in her mid-thirties or older, so cloning one of the parents may be their final hope for having a child with a biological tie. (discovermagazine.com)
  • cures
  • Q: Are adult stem cells currently providing cures for disease? (marymeetsdolly.com)
  • I'd say just as a very clear comment, we are all for cures and everybody is for cures of ailments that are affecting human society, that are affecting people in this country and around the world. (votesmart.org)
  • And I'm fearful that in the great intent that people have in moving forward with human cloning that what they're failing to do is to look at the human species as having inherent dignity and something that's worth standing up for and worth fighting for, instead -- in looking for cures, turning people into property and into research animals and spare parts. (votesmart.org)