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  • stem cell lines
  • We started last year in September and by mid-December we had already established some stem cell lines. (abc.net.au)
  • Although it was possible to do cloning and make stem cell lines using cloning in other species, it proved very, very difficult to do in humans," he told AM. (abc.net.au)
  • The university's nine-member investigative panel said it could not find any of the 11 stem cell lines matched to patients, as Hwang had reported in that research. (semissourian.com)
  • Woo Suk Hwang, of Seoul National University, South Korea and colleagues used an improved technique for cloning embryos to create stem cell lines for 11 patients with various diseases or injuries. (kurzweilai.net)
  • While being charged with fraud and embezzlement, he has kept a relatively low profile at the Sooam Bioengineering Research Institute in Yongin, Gyeonggi Province, where he currently leads research efforts on creating cloned pig embryos and using them to make embryonic stem-cell lines. (wikipedia.org)
  • Furthermore, they specifically proposed hESC research should steer away from attempting to produce viable offspring, focusing efforts on the use of cloned embryos as a viable source for deriving stem cell lines instead. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hwang claimed to have created eleven different patent-specific stem cell lines. (wikipedia.org)
  • Four embryonic stem cell lines from human fetal somatic cells were derived from those blastocysts. (wikipedia.org)
  • The disease specific stem cell lines could then be studied in order to better understand the condition. (wikipedia.org)
  • Another application of SCNT stem cell research is using the patient specific stem cell lines to generate tissues or even organs for transplant into the specific patient. (wikipedia.org)
  • In February 2001, George W. Bush requested a review of the NIH's guidelines, and after a policy discussion within his circle of supporters, implemented a policy in August of that year to limit the number of embryonic stem cell lines that could be used for research. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2001
  • When the editors of Time screamed on the cover of their February 19, 2001 issue, "Human Cloning is Closer than You Think! (apologeticspress.org)
  • The United Nations began considering a global convention banning human cloning in 2001 but has twice delayed a vote because the issue of stem-cell research has been so emotional and divisive. (orlandosentinel.com)
  • 1997-2001: Professor and Vice-Chair of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the Oregon Health & Science University and Professor of Cell and Developmental Biology. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2001 - present: Professor and Vice-Chair of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences and Professor of Cell Biology and Physiology at the University of Pittsburgh, where he is also Director of the Division of Developmental and Regenerative Medicine at the School of Medicine. (wikipedia.org)
  • The International Society for Stem Cell Research was officially incorporated on March 30, 2001, to foster the exchange of information on stem cell research. (wikipedia.org)
  • On 14 January 2001 the British government passed The Human Fertilisation and Embryology (Research Purposes) Regulations 2001 to amend the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 1990 by extending allowable reasons for embryo research to permit research around stem cells and cell nuclear replacement, thus allowing therapeutic cloning. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, on 15 November 2001, a pro-life group won a High Court legal challenge, which struck down the regulation and effectively left all forms of cloning unregulated in the UK. (wikipedia.org)
  • Parliament was quick to pass the Human Reproductive Cloning Act 2001 in order to explicitly prohibit reproductive cloning. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2001, he was also the first to clone an endangered species (a Gaur), and in 2003, he cloned an endangered wild ox (a Banteng) from the frozen skin cells of an animal that had died at the San Diego Zoo nearly a quarter-of-a-century earlier. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mitalipov
  • Dr Mitalipov said that since the reprogrammed cells use genetic material from the patient, there was no concern about transplant rejection. (abc.net.au)
  • Mitalipov claims the problems in the paper were innocent mistakes made because he rushed to publish the findings in the journal Cell . (wyomingpublicmedia.org)
  • In 2013, Mitalipov was the first to derive stem cells from human embryos created by cloning adult cells . (newscientist.com)
  • After the fall of the Soviet Union in 1991 funding for stem cell research was scarce, so Mitalipov applied for and won a fellowship at Utah State University in 1995. (wikipedia.org)
  • A therapy for mitochondrial diseases that Mitalipov discovered, the "spindle transfer" technique, involves removing the nucleus from a human egg and placing it into another. (wikipedia.org)
  • In May 2013, Mitalipov and his team published a study in Cell that describes a new process for creating human stem cells from skin cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • In July 2017, Mitalipov and his team performed the first known successful attempt at creating genetically modified human embryos, using the CRISPR/Cas9 gene modifying tool. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mitalipov and his team experimented upon a larger number of embryos, and further demonstrated the possibility of safely and efficiently correcting defective genes that cause inherited diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • breakthrough
  • WASHINGTON - A way of fighting cancer that turns the body's immune cells into targeted tumor killers was named the breakthrough of the year by the US journal Science on Thursday. (inquirer.net)
  • This would have been the first major breakthrough in human cloning. (wikipedia.org)
  • ethics
  • While nuclear transfer breakthroughs often lead to a public discussion about the ethics of human cloning, this is not our focus, nor do we believe our findings might be used by others to advance the possibility of human reproductive cloning," they said. (abc.net.au)
  • This was all done before much debate had been had over the ethics of human cloning. (scribd.com)
  • Courtney Campbell, director of the Program for Ethics, Science and the Environment at Oregon State University, says, "Some traditions and leading figures in conservative Protestantism who were opposed to human cloning for reproductive reasons have come to see that given the ambiguity about their own views about the status of embryonic life, and given the potential for health benefits, they could be opposed to reproductive cloning, but affirm therapeutic cloning. (wikipedia.org)
  • The possibility of using the procedure on human eggs has raised safety and ethics questions. (wikipedia.org)
  • genetic material
  • Actually the nice thing about this is that if you had some genetic disease(like cystic fibrosis) you could take the genetic material out of one of your skin cells, correct it, and then use that with this process to make an embryo. (slashdot.org)
  • Next, they removed most of the DNA from each egg and replaced the genetic material with DNA from other peoples' skin cells. (kwit.org)
  • Scottish embryologist Ian Wilmut and his colleagues had taken a mammary gland cell from a six-year-old Scottish Finn Dorset ewe and, via a process known as "nuclear transfer," succeeded in placing the genetic material from that cell into a hollowed-out egg cell from a Scottish Blackface sheep. (apologeticspress.org)
  • The offspring having all of the mother's genetic material are called full clones and those having only half are called half clones. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cryoconservation of animal genetic resources is a practice in which animal germplasms, such as embryos are collected and stored at low temperatures with the intent of conserving the genetic material. (wikipedia.org)
  • eggs
  • It's a problem with human cloneing, because human eggs are expensive - the only way to get them is to pump a woman full of hormones to induce many ovulations at once. (slashdot.org)
  • One sure way to prevent it would be to edit the genes of sperm or eggs rather than of embryos . (newscientist.com)
  • In May, the government withdrew its opposition in a draft fertility bill and now seeks to outlaw only embryos created by mixing sperm and eggs from humans and animals. (physiciansforlife.org)
  • Hwang explained that his team used 242 eggs to create a single cell line. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dr. Wood and a colleague donated skin cells and the DNA from those cells was transferred into human eggs. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dr. Wood and a colleague donated skin cells, and DNA from those cells was transferred to human eggs. (wikipedia.org)
  • To understand the normal biologic role of reverse transcriptase, Kiessling began to study eggs and early cleaving embryos. (wikipedia.org)
  • genome
  • In the August and September 2000 issues, I penned two articles on "Cracking the Code-The Human Genome Project in Perspective. (apologeticspress.org)
  • This occurs when genome editing does not take place until after the DNA of a fertilised egg has begun to divide, meaning only some cells in the resulting embryo have the desired change, and any resulting children might still develop the disease that was supposed to be prevented. (newscientist.com)
  • Because the cloned animals are normal, our experiment also shows that [some] brain functions do not involve genetic alterations of the neuron s genome," said Jaenisch. (innovations-report.com)
  • Development will ensue normally and after many mitotic divisions, this single cell forms a blastocyst (an early stage embryo with about 100 cells) with an identical genome to the original organism (i.e. a clone). (wikipedia.org)
  • Article 11 of UNESCO's Universal Declaration on the Human Genome and Human Rights asserts that the reproductive cloning of human beings is contrary to human dignity, that a potential life represented by the embryo is destroyed when embryonic cells are used, and there is a significant likelihood that cloned individuals would be biologically damaged, due to the inherent unreliability of cloning technology. (wikipedia.org)
  • IRX5 human gene location in the UCSC Genome Browser. (wikipedia.org)
  • nucleus
  • A scientist removes the nucleus from a human egg using a pipette. (kwit.org)
  • The nucleus of a body cell is removed and inserted into an egg cell which has had its nucleus removed. (abc.net.au)
  • In this case, each embryo was created by taking a nucleus from a skin cell (donated by Wood and a colleague) and inserting it into a human egg from which the nucleus had been removed. (wikipedia.org)
  • mammalian
  • He was the first to apply clonal analysis to study cell fate and potency in mammals, and used this strategy to provide conclusive evidence against early segregation of the mammalian germline. (wikipedia.org)
  • His group has demonstrated the importance of the sperm centrosome-centriole complex during mammalian fertilization (including humans), with the unexpected exception of rodents in which the centrosome is of maternal origin (see Selected Publications). (wikipedia.org)
  • While a PhD candidate in the 1960s, Brinster developed the first reliable in vitro culture system for early mammalian embryos. (wikipedia.org)
  • genes
  • A fourth paper describing attempts to correct defective genes in human embryos using CRISPR is about to be published. (newscientist.com)
  • According to Axel, the cloning achievement eliminates one potential mechanism and narrows the possible ways in which a cell chooses one of thousands of receptor genes. (innovations-report.com)
  • This report pioneered the importance of naturally occurring retrovirus sequences in human genes, now thought to be important to the genetic plasticity involved in human evolution and biology. (wikipedia.org)
  • A potential use of stem cells genetically matched to a patient would be to create cell lines that have genes linked to a patient's particular disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • germ
  • Clonal analysis of X-chromosome inactivation and the origin of the germ line in the mouse embryo. (wikipedia.org)
  • The position and arrangement of the germ layers are highly species-specific, however, depending on the type of embryo produced. (wikipedia.org)
  • In vertebrates, a special population of embryonic cells called the neural crest has been proposed as a "fourth germ layer", and is thought to have been an important novelty in the evolution of head structures. (wikipedia.org)
  • In recent years, Brinster has continued to advance the field of stem cell biology, having made a series of catalyzing, transformational discoveries utilizing male germ line stem cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • with Mario Capecchi and Oliver Smithies 2003 Selected for the Hall of Honor National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (15 members, total) 2006 Gairdner Foundation International Award, Canada "for pioneering discoveries in germ line modification in mammals. (wikipedia.org)
  • or Germ cells voluntarily donated. (wikipedia.org)
  • sperm
  • Then, after a long search, they finally found the best way to stimulate each egg so that it would develop into an embryo without the need to be fertilized with sperm. (kwit.org)
  • That zygote-which then contained the full complement of 54 chromosomes (as if it had been fertilized by a sperm cell)-was placed into the uterus of a second Scottish Blackface sheep that served as a surrogate mother. (apologeticspress.org)
  • Other hybrid embryos, such as those created by fertilising an animal egg with human sperm, or vice versa, were less well supported. (physiciansforlife.org)