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  • peripheral
  • As a result, the delivery of oxygen and nutrients to cells and tissues is strongly impaired, causing a multitude of health problems, such as kidney failure, heart attacks, strokes, blindness, and peripheral artery disease, leading to amputations. (eurostemcell.org)
  • This protocol explains the isolation of CD34 + cells from peripheral blood using magnetic bead separation technique. (bio-protocol.org)
  • This is a case of clinically importance for two reason, firstly it will help clinicians save a broad differential diagnosis when attending to evaluate analogous cases and secondly, it may confirm the role of autologous peripheral blood stem cells (PB-SCs) in enhancing auto-immune response against parasitic infection and in regulating insulin uptake in diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2). (cuni.cz)
  • tissue
  • Blood drawn with a simple needle stick can be coaxed into producing stem cells that may have the ability to form any type of tissue in the body, three independent papers report in the July 2 Cell Stem Cell . (wired.com)
  • More research is needed to determine whether these cells can be further coaxed to form fully functional tissue, says Rudolf Jaenisch of MIT and the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research in Cambridge, Massachusetts, who led one of the studies. (wired.com)
  • The concern is that if these cells retain traces of memory from their previous lives as blood cells, they may not be good at forming other tissue types. (wired.com)
  • Under tissue culture hood, add equal volume of 2% dextran solution and blood sample and incubate it at room temperature for 45 min (elimination of majority of erythrocytes). (bio-protocol.org)
  • Cell replacement strategies using stem cells (SCs) as donor tissue have emerged as a promising approach for restoration of function in neurodegenerative diseases [ 14 - 19 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • Scientists
  • The new technique will allow scientists to tap a large, readily available source of personalized stem cells. (wired.com)
  • Scientists' manipulations turned the stem cells in the new studies into several types of mature blood cells, including infection-fighting T cells. (wired.com)
  • For the first time, scientists managed to grow perfect human blood vessels as organoids in a petri dish. (eurostemcell.org)
  • Dr. Dick works out of UHN's Ontario Cancer Institute (OCI) - the venerable institution where stem-cell science began in 1961 with the original discovery of Drs. James Till and Ernest McCulloch - and McEwen Centre for Regenerative Medicine with the next generation of stem-cell scientists focused on developing better and more effective treatments for heart disease, diabetes, respiratory disease and spinal cord injury. (healthcanal.com)
  • Now, stem-cell scientists can start mapping the molecular switches that guide how "normal" stem cells behave and endure, and also characterize the core properties that distinguish them from all other blood cell types. (healthcanal.com)
  • In one of the biggest breakthroughs in stem cell technology in recent years, scientists in the U.S have found a way to create human blood stem cells in a laboratory. (ajanreginald.com)
  • Paraplegic rats regained the ability to walk and sensation was restored in their hindquarters after Israeli scientists implanted human stem cells along their severed spinal cords , according to research published this week. (inlander.com)
  • Medical Xpress) -- Scientists at the University of Birmingham have demonstrated for the first time that human brain cells can become infected with the Hepatitis C virus (HCV), it is reported today. (medicalxpress.com)
  • OCT4 and SOX2
  • After 48 hr, imaging is performed and single-cell OCT4 and SOX2 expression levels are quantified. (nih.gov)
  • behavior
  • The viruses used to deliver genes into the cells may have unintended consequences, and the cells' long-term behavior is still unknown. (wired.com)
  • The findings also suggest that changes in the expression of genes associated with universal cell signaling pathways can have a substantial impact on human stem cell behavior. (news-medical.net)
  • Because HES-1 and HLF impact HSC function via two different mechanisms involving integral pathways common to all human cells, the authors suggest that HSC behavior may be controlled by general rather than HSC-specific genes. (news-medical.net)
  • Our report identifies regulatory factors involved in HSC function that elicit their effect through independent systems and suggest that a unique orchestration of pathways fundamental to all human cells is capable of controlling stem cell behavior," explains Dr. Bhatia. (news-medical.net)
  • Researchers
  • Because taking blood is safe, fast and efficient compared to current stem cell harvesting methods, some of which include biopsies and pretreatments with drugs, researchers hope that blood-derived stem cells could one day be used to study and treat diseases - though major safety hurdles remain. (wired.com)
  • Researchers are still a long way off from transplanting such stem cells or their mature offspring into people safely. (wired.com)
  • After studying the genes involved in blood production, the researchers identified proteins that control these genes and applied them to their stem cells. (newscientist.com)
  • The researchers identified two genes that act independently to enhance cell-cycle progression and inhibit cell death specifically in HSCs. (news-medical.net)
  • The researchers note that while hESCs have been successfully co-cultured using human fetal muscle and skin cells , adult fallopian tube epithelial cells, foreskin cells, and bone marrow stem cells, their study used hUCMScs to create a co-culture. (phys.org)
  • However, according to the researchers, when using various mouse or primate tissues, and even when using human tissues for co-cultures, tumor-like formations called "teratomas" - growths containing tissues belonging to all three germ layers - often form. (phys.org)
  • A protein that helps maintain mouse stem cell pluripotency has been identified by researchers at the RIKEN Omics Science Center. (phys.org)
  • Researchers reviewed hundreds of cases of leukemia as well as other blood disorders. (hemacare.com)
  • Now, however, the blood-brain barrier may be poised to give up some of its secrets as researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have created in the laboratory dish the cells that make up the brain's protective barrier. (medicalxpress.com)
  • MSCs
  • In this study, we examined the ability of cryopreserved UCB harvests to produce cells with characteristics of MSCs. (semanticscholar.org)
  • In MSCs-transplanted group, TUNEL-positive cells were decreased and BrdU-positive cells were significantly increased rats compared with control group. (hindawi.com)
  • neural
  • Thus, after exposure to different agents, these cells are able to express antigens of diverse cellular lineages, including the neural type [ 26 - 31 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • regenerative
  • This discovery means we now have an increasingly detailed road map of the human blood development system including the much sought after stem cell," says principal investigator John Dick, who holds a Canada Research Chair in Stem Cell Biology and is a Senior Scientist at the McEwen Centre for Regenerative Medicine and the Ontario Cancer Institute, University Health Network (UHN). (healthcanal.com)
  • These new findings are a major step to generate sufficient quantities of stem cells to enable greater clinical use and thus move closer to realizing the promise of regenerative medicine for patients. (healthcanal.com)
  • The paper was co-authored by Stephen Chang, PhD, Vice President, Research and Development of The New York Stem Cell Foundation and Mahendra Rao, PhD, Director of the Center for Regenerative Medicine at the National Institutes of Health. (nyscf.org)
  • angiogenic
  • In this study the authors evaluate the results of intramyocardial injection of human resident cardiac stem cells and blood derived circulatory angiogenic cells in a mouse myocardial infarction model, comparing the effect on ventricular function and myocardial repair of combined and individual administration of the cells. (ctsnet.org)
  • Rats
  • Intravenous administered HuUCBMCs reached the cerebellum and brain stem of 3-AP ataxic rats. (hindawi.com)
  • In addition, HuUCBMCs upregulated the expression of proteins that are critical for cell survival, such as phospho-Akt and Bcl-2, in the cerebellum and brain stem of 3-AP ataxic rats. (hindawi.com)
  • Three weeks after introduction of the stem cells, 42 percent of the implanted paraplegic rats showed a markedly improved ability to support weight on their hind limbs and walk. (inlander.com)
  • In contrast, control paraplegic rats that did not receive stem cells showed no improved mobility or sensory responses," says the study's lead researcher. (inlander.com)
  • Research is ongoing to determine why some rats didn't respond: "Although there is still some way to go before it can be applied in humans, this research gives hope. (inlander.com)
  • genes
  • A study published in the May issue of Developmental Cell identifies specific genes that appear to be key players in the regulation of human-blood stem cells. (news-medical.net)
  • They then identified proteins which control the genes involved in blood production, and applied them to the stem cells. (ajanreginald.com)
  • "From a mechanistic point of view, the fact that cord blood-derived iPS cells could be generated by activating only two genes is a crucial point that offers new possibilities for investigating the molecular basis of the reprogramming process," concludes Dr. Izpisúa Belmonte. (blogspot.com)
  • Therapy
  • Better post-infarct ventricular function and myocardial repair were observed with combination therapy than when either type of cell was given alone. (ctsnet.org)
  • Thus, their potential for clinical use as a cell-based therapy should be focused and observation. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • As all these effects were accompanied by a temporal but significant improvement in motor coordination, HuUCBMCs grafts can be considered as an effective cell replacement therapy for cerebellar disorders. (hindawi.com)
  • In the June issue of Expert Opinion on Biological Therapy, Monica Zhou, PhD, published a paper assessing the current and potential applications for human umbilical cord blood in treating disease. (nyscf.org)
  • Hence, tumor-specific T SCM have become potential candidate for adoptive T cell therapy of cancer. (biomedcentral.com)
  • diseases
  • But even if the cells won't be put directly into patients, Jaenisch says that the new method "opens up access to enormous resources of collected cells from patients" that can be used to study diseases. (wired.com)
  • This breakthrough opens the door to harnessing the power of these life-producing cells to treat cancer and other debilitating diseases more effectively. (healthcanal.com)
  • This could mean a huge step forward for the treatment of blood diseases and leukaemia in the future. (ajanreginald.com)
  • The results of the study could be monumental in the treatment of blood diseases and leukaemia. (ajanreginald.com)
  • mutations
  • What's more, inducing fibroblasts to form stem cells can take about a month in the lab, during which mutations can accumulate. (wired.com)
  • Evidence for MPL W515L/K mutations in hematopoietic stem cells in primitive myelofibrosis. (semanticscholar.org)
  • However, issues related to difficulty harvesting adult cells, inefficient reprogramming and the accumulation of genetic errors (mutations) that may contribute to an increased risk for cancer and diminished cellular functionality have presented formidable challenges. (blogspot.com)
  • Both research groups highlight the substantial clinical convenience of the existing networks for banking human cord blood and the theoretical advantage of these "young" cells in that they may have a decreased risk of having accumulated damaging genetic mutations associated with adult cells. (blogspot.com)
  • research
  • The role of one gene, HES-1, ties in with previous research pointing to the importance of the cell-cycle-associated Notch signaling pathway. (news-medical.net)
  • As well as being a Senior Scientist at UHN's Princess Margaret and Toronto General Hospitals, he is a Professor in the Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Toronto, and Director of the Cancer Stem Cell Program at the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research. (healthcanal.com)
  • Purified stem cells are utilized for research and are available to investigators (both on- and off-campus) for a fee. (augusta.edu)
  • therapies
  • Dr. Zhou and her team are also exploring cord blood's potential to offer new treatment options for non-blood related disorders, as iPS cells derived from cord blood could potentially be used for a variety of cell therapies without risk of immune rejection to the patient. (nyscf.org)
  • Our findings should facilitate the clinical translation of iPS cell-based therapies," says Dr. Izpisúa Belmonte. (blogspot.com)
  • pluripotentiality
  • A population of lymphocytes, separable from the great majority by virtue of their larger size and their failure to exhibit the rosetting characteristics of thymus-dependent lymphocytes and bursa-equivalent cells, possess true pluripotentiality. (sciencemag.org)
  • organs
  • Our entire body is nurtured by a huge vascular tree consisting of larger blood vessels that bring blood to organs, so called arteries, capillaries where blood flow slows down and oxygen exchange happens, and veins that recirculate the blood back to the lungs and heart", says lead author Josef Penninger. (eurostemcell.org)
  • laboratory
  • The human vascular organoids that were made "diabetic" in the laboratory recapitulate those basement membrane changes and can now be used as diabetic model in the lab to identify novel therapeutics. (eurostemcell.org)
  • This BSL-2 laboratory is staffed with a full-time manager, is approved for human samples and is licensed by the International Council for Commonality in Blood Banking Automation. (augusta.edu)