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  • triggers
  • Hot coffee is the most problematic source of hot flashes because you are dealing with two triggers, a hot beverage and caffeine. (livestrong.com)
  • Hot flashes can be stopped through hormone therapy or can be prevented by avoiding the triggers, such as cigarette smoke, stress, alcohol, spicy foods, caffeine, tight clothing and heat. (reference.com)
  • As a result, though both processes involve the hypothalamus, ovulation is associated with a rise in estrogen, not the estrogen drop that often triggers hot flashes. (livestrong.com)
  • nonhormonal
  • In fact, from 50% to 80% of perimenopausal women try nonhormonal therapies for hot flashes, but without any real guidance on what works (and what doesn't), woman experiment with different products, often delaying their chance at finding effective treatment, wasting capital, or they suffer in silence. (menopause.org)
  • A number of nonhormonal products and techniques are promoted for hot flashes, but they are often untested and unproven. (menopause.org)
  • Our findings suggest that among healthy women, 10 to 20 mg/d of escitalopram provides a nonhormonal, off-label option that is effective and well-tolerated in the management of menopausal hot flashes. (psychcentral.com)
  • placebo
  • At 24 weeks, 48% of the women who got Paxil had a 50% or higher reduction in hot flashes compared to 36% of the women who got the placebo. (breastcancer.org)
  • The second study was very similar to the first (the women were having the same number of hot flashes and were randomly selected to receive the same dose of Paxil or placebo), but lasted only 12 weeks. (breastcancer.org)
  • At 12 weeks, hot flashes were reduced by about 58% in women who got Paxil and 49% in women who got the placebo. (breastcancer.org)
  • Women taking a placebo medication reported a 40% to 48% reduction in hot flashes, so the panel was skeptical that the further reduction reported by women taking paroxetine was "clinically meaningful. (latimes.com)
  • A few small studies suggested that this treatment had potential, but this is the first study to show that this hot flash treatment really is better than placebo. (innovations-report.com)
  • The 3-week postintervention follow-up demonstrated that hot flashes increased after cessation of escitalopram but not after cessation of placebo, providing further evidence of escitalopram's effects," the authors write. (psychcentral.com)
  • gabapentin
  • How bad is it to take gabapentin for hot flashes whatch has become unbearable since breast cancer? (drugs.com)
  • The same committee also recommended against approval of an antiseizure drug, gabapentin (known commercially as Neurontin) for hot flashes. (latimes.com)
  • SSRIs
  • Selective serotonin and serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs and SNRIs) have been investigated for hot flash treatment with mixed results. (psychcentral.com)
  • treatments
  • In the meantime, there are treatments for hot flashes. (webmd.com)
  • Hormonal treatments had been the predominant therapy for menopausal hot flashes, but their use decreased substantially after the Women's Health Initiative Estrogen plus Progestin study found that the benefits did not necessarily outweight the risks associated with serious side effects. (psychcentral.com)
  • No other treatments have U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval for menopausal hot flashes, and the efficacy of alternative pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic agents is inconclusive, according to the article. (psychcentral.com)
  • Physiologically
  • No one knows for sure what happens physiologically when you get a hot flash, but some say it probably starts with increased blood flow in the heat regulatory part of the brain. (livestrong.com)
  • Physiologically, a hot flash happens for the same reason that you sweat in a sauna… the body is trying to cool down. (everydayhealth.com)
  • sweats
  • The flashes and sweats are thought to result from dilation of the blood vessels close to the skin . (webmd.com)