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  • Great Plains
  • Those known today as Sioux (the Dakota, the Lakota, and the Nakota), living primarily in the upper Great Plains region, are among the best-known Indians within American popular culture due to their participation in what Americans perceive to have been dramatic events within their own history, such as the Battle of the Little Big Horn in the late nineteenth century. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Tribal
  • Chestnut Global Partners (CGP) and One Feather Consulting today announce a joint venture providing Native American-sensitive EAP and disease management services targeting more than 1,000 tribal nations and bands across North America. (prweb.com)
  • This, combined with their world-class infrastructure, enables us to serve the broad range of tribal workforces across North America with the resources and responsiveness of a large EAP, while providing a comfort level of an EAP with roots in their community. (prweb.com)
  • Many Siouan-language peoples are no longer identified as Sioux , but have evolved their own separate tribal identities centuries ago, long before contact with non-Indians. (encyclopedia.com)
  • continents
  • The native religions of North America, like those of other continents, by and large rely on oral rather than written transmission, which is why they are sometimes called preliterate, or primal, acknowledging their ancient status (the term "primitive" is no longer applied, because of its pejorative connotation). (wisdompills.com)
  • 21st
  • Under colonial authorities and later under national and state governments, native peoples were subject to discriminatory political and legal policies well into the 20th, and even the 21st, century. (britannica.com)
  • bodies
  • One of these is the "firewater" myth-a common stereotype suggesting that "Indians can't hold their liquor" because their bodies metabolize alcohol differently. (nih.gov)
  • The astronomer Thomas Harriot , who accompanied Sir Richard Grenville on his 1585 expedition to Roanoke Island , explains that the plant "openeth all the pores and passages of the body" so that the natives' "bodies are notably preserved in health, and know not many grievous diseases, wherewithal we in England are often times afflicted. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nations
  • Later, Native Americans in Canada began to refer to themselves as First Nations. (britannica.com)
  • One Feather Consulting brings more than ten years of experience providing EAP services to Native Nations and the Indian gaming industry. (prweb.com)
  • Sioux writers, poets, and political leaders are today among the most influential leaders in the North American Native American community of nations, and the Sioux religion can be found to have an influence far beyond the Sioux people. (encyclopedia.com)
  • In the East and Southeast, from early colonial times, there was much disagreement regarding the nature of the relations with the Indian nations. (encyclopedia.com)
  • There was also a constant need to have allies among the Indian nations during the period of European colonial rivalry on the North American continent, a need that the newly formed United States felt with great urgency during the first generation of its existence. (encyclopedia.com)
  • It was the discovery of gold in 1828, however, at the far southern end of the Cherokee Nation near the border with Georgia that set off a Southern gold rush and brought an urgency to long-debated questions of what the nature of relations with the Indian nations should be. (encyclopedia.com)
  • The Sioux had no way of knowing about the process that had worked itself out in the East and Southeast, whereby, in direct contravention of a U.S. Supreme Court decision ( Worchester vs. Georgia ), Indians would no longer be dealt with as sovereign nations. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Many Eastern and Southern Indian nations were uprooted and forced to remove themselves beyond the Mississippi River . (encyclopedia.com)
  • epidemic
  • One of the curious - and historically fortunate - details revealed by this record is that it contains no mention of the smallpox epidemic of 1781-82, suggesting that this small band of Sioux, at least, managed to escape the contagion which destroyed fully half of all the Indian population of North America," wrote Native American art authority Michael Cowdrey, who examined the Rosebud winter count shortly after it was discovered. (sbsun.com)
  • California
  • allele, however, was found in a small proportion of a group of Southwest California Indians and had a protective effect against alcoholism in that population. (nih.gov)
  • allele was found in a similar proportion of Southwest California Indians and also was associated with a protective effect. (nih.gov)
  • This article explores to what extent the presence of certain variants of alcohol-metabolizing enzymes may, or may not, account for the high rates of alcohol use and AUDs in a select group of Indians residing in southwestern California (Mission Indians), for whom high rates of alcohol dependence have been reported (i.e., up to 72 percent for men and 53 percent for women) (Ehlers et al. (nih.gov)
  • comprise
  • The Siouan-language peoples comprise one of the largest language groups north of Mexico, second only to the Algonquian family of languages. (encyclopedia.com)
  • lands
  • In their letter of endorsement, they do indeed point out the problems of the term, 'Occupy,' which has historically been connected with the theft of Native American lands," he said. (theatlantic.com)
  • The lands of the Sioux have also been a focal point for some of the most dramatic events in the American Indian Movement of recent times, especially the 71-day occupation of Wounded Knee, South Dakota , in 1973, which brought national media attention to the Pine Ridge Reservation. (encyclopedia.com)
  • tend
  • Native Americans tend to experience higher rates of alcoholism per population sample than other demographic subsets. (allstarrchiro.net)
  • But the sentence that really got my attention was this: "Many families here belong to 100 or so Melungeon clans of Portuguese and American Indian descent, who tend to be suspicious of change and have a history of self-reliance. (melungeon.org)
  • sovereign
  • One Feather Consulting ( http://www.onefeatherconsulting.com ) is a majority Native American owned company with its administrative office based from the sovereign territory of the Seneca Nation of Indians (New York). (prweb.com)
  • Sioux
  • It's called a winter count, a virtual picture history of a Sioux or Lakota Indian tribe. (sbsun.com)
  • theories
  • Over the years, several popular theories and myths have arisen concerning alcohol use and its consequences in Native American communities. (nih.gov)
  • For more details on theories of Paleo-Indians migration, see Models of migration to the New World . (thefullwiki.org)
  • Korea
  • In the Korean War , which began in 1950 and ended in 1953, the United States entered into military engagement not only with Communist North Korea but also with the far stronger People's Republic of China. (encyclopedia.com)
  • continent
  • The immense geographical spread of Siouan-language peoples, from the Rocky Mountains to the Atlantic Ocean , from the Great Lakes to the Gulf of Mexico, attests to their importance in the history of the North American continent - most of that history having occurred before the arrival of non-Indians. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Free-ranging horses ( Equus caballus ) in North America are considered to be feral animals since they are descendents of non-native domestic horses introduced to the continent. (biomedcentral.com)
  • found
  • Suburban San Bernardino County is hardly the locale you'd expect for a great archeological discovery, but in that trunk - ignored for many years while there - a priceless relic of Native American heritage was found in 1998. (sbsun.com)
  • and within a generation they found themselves paupers in their native land, with no alternative but to accept reservation life. (encyclopedia.com)
  • years
  • For years the standard view of North America before Columbus's arrival was as a vast, grassy expanse teeming with game and all but empty of people. (nielsenhayden.com)
  • Tackett's family had lived in Pomona, Ontario and Upland before his mother moved north, bringing along the old trunk that his aunt, Myrtle Miller Anderson, had when she lived her last years with them. (sbsun.com)
  • As you probably know, North America had horses millions of years ago, but they disappeared around 10,000 years back. (hubpages.com)
  • although
  • 1999). Moreover, although alcohol consumption has taken a greater toll on Native American men than on women, alcohol-related death rates in Native American women still are 3 to 10 times higher, depending on age, than in women in the general population. (nih.gov)
  • Although labeled Hindu, the majority of Indians were Sikh. (wikipedia.org)
  • eastern
  • Utterly without fear, Soto brushed past the Indian force into what is now eastern Arkansas, through thickly settled land-"very well peopled with large towns," one of his men later recalled, "two or three of which were to be seen from one town. (nielsenhayden.com)
  • The presence of Indian-Americans also helped develop interest in Eastern religions in the US and would result in its influence on American philosophies such as Transcendentalism . (wikipedia.org)
  • diversity
  • Ethnic diversity is not what comes immediately to mind when we think of the American South - perhaps especially not when we think of the Southern mountains. (melungeon.org)
  • life
  • Anderson, a native of Sweden, was also a photographer whose pictures provided rare views of everyday Indian life during the half century he was at the reservation. (sbsun.com)
  • Included is a work/life module that provides specialized resources to support Native American employees and their families in everything from eldercare to financial planning. (prweb.com)
  • culture
  • They have worked for the revitalization of traditional culture by encouraging the use of native languages. (britannica.com)
  • While anti-Asian racism was embedded in U.S. politics and culture in the early 20th century, Indians were also racialized for their anticolonialism, with U.S. officials, casting them as a "Hindu" menace, pushing for Western imperial expansion abroad. (wikipedia.org)
  • As a Native-owned EAP, we understand the diverse social structures, traditions, and environmental culture of Native Peoples, and bring a deep familiarity of the issues, dynamics, and what it takes to overcome the barriers to EAP counseling," said Dr. Rodney Haring, Founder and CEO of One Feather Consulting. (prweb.com)
  • As American Indians emerged during the past century from the controlling influence of Christian missionaries on the reservations, they have fought to reclaim their religious heritage and to guard it from distortion by the dominant white culture of North America. (wisdompills.com)
  • primarily
  • Certain ancillary and specialty services were not always available to the Native Americans served by the 13 facilities, primarily because of gaps in the services offered by the facilities. (gao.gov)
  • race
  • He used the 1924 Racial Integrity Act to classify Virginia Indians and mixed-race individuals as "colored," and therefore denied basic civil rights under Virginia's system of segregation. (melungeon.org)
  • Indian Americans comprising 3,456,447 alone and 4,121,994 including mixed race Indian Americans are the country's third-largest Asian group alone or in combination with other races after Chinese Americans and Filipino Americans , according to 2016 American Community Survey data. (wikipedia.org)
  • Health Service
  • This is the accessible text file for GAO report number GAO-05-789 entitled 'Indian Health Service: Health Care Services Are Not Always Available to Native Americans' which was released on September 30, 2005. (gao.gov)
  • It has also provided much-needed revenue to Indian Health Service (IHS) and Tribally operated facilities, allowing them to expand services and hire and retain more staff. (cbpp.org)
  • Indian Health Service reports of age-adjusted death rates attributed to alcohol are more than five times higher than those for the general U.S. population (Shalala et al. (nih.gov)
  • Disease
  • Incidence data were collected by the National Cancer Institute (Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results [SEER] Program), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (National Program of Cancer Registries), and the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries. (las.ac.cn)