• Diseases where leech therapy was indicated were skin diseases, sciatica, and musculoskeletal pains In medieval and early modern medicine, the medicinal leech (Hirudo medicinalis and its congeners Hirudo verbana, Hirudo troctina, and Hirudo orientalis) was used to remove blood from a patient as part of a process to balance the humors that, according to Galen, must be kept in balance for the human body to function properly. (wikipedia.org)
  • Here we report the cloning of two innexins from the leech Hirudo medicinalis . (jneurosci.org)
  • The medicinal leech (Hirudo medicinalis) has a slightly flattened cylindrical body, divided into 33 or 34 segments. (arkive.org)
  • Leech plush doll is based on Hirudo medicinalis. (giantmicrobes.com)
  • While sharp instruments were commonly used to initiate the required blood flow, the use of leeches for this purpose was very wide spread as well - and the medical leech Hirudo medicinalis was particularly useful for the task because its saliva contains hirudin, a powerful anti-clotting substance. (giantmicrobes.com)
  • The cocoon looks like those produced by living leeches, such as the medicinal leech Hirudo medicinalis . (mnn.com)
  • Freeze-fracture studies on the nerve cord of the leech Hirudo medicinalis reveal that the plasma membranes of various cells, including glial and muscle cells, contain at least two distinct types of aggregated intramembrane particles, identified as hemidesmosomes and gap junctions. (elsevier.com)
  • It is doubtful whether the medicinal leech, Hirudo medicinalis, which is rarer in England than on the continent of Europe, or the horse leech, Aulastoma gulo, often confused with it, has the best right to the original possession of this name. (yourdictionary.com)
  • Since the 1970s, Hirudo medicinalis, better known as the European medicinal leech has been routinely used to drain blood after reconstructive surgery, particularly in finger reattachment and reconstructive surgery of the ear, nose, lip, and eyelid. (houseofnames.com)