Loading...
  • myeloid
  • Activating mutations in this gene are associated with gastrointestinal stromal tumors, testicular seminoma, mast cell disease, melanoma, acute myeloid leukemia, while inactivating mutations are associated with the genetic defect piebaldism. (wikipedia.org)
  • Stem cells decrease in number and tend to lose the ability to differentiate into progenies or lymphoid lineages and myeloid lineages. (wikipedia.org)
  • While some other authors have contested these, and maintained that they are true EPCs, many investigators have begun to term these cells colony forming unit-Hill cells (CFU-Hill) or circulating angiogenic cells (CAC) instead (depending on the method of isolation), highlighting their role as hematopoietic myeloid cells involved in promoting new vessel growth. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ligand
  • Indeed, stimulation of osteoclasts activity by Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor Kappa-B Ligand (RANKL) increases HSPC mobilization through secretion of cathepsin K, which cleaves c-Kit-ligand and Stromal Cell-Derived Factor 1 (SDF-1), required for maintenance of endosteal niches. (hindawi.com)
  • Stem cell factor (also known as SCF, KIT-ligand, KL, or steel factor) is a cytokine that binds to the c-KIT receptor (CD117). (wikipedia.org)
  • Quiescent
  • Moreover, they can make this transition even in the absence of noticeable injuries and are capable of replenishing entire gastric units, in essence serving as quiescent "reserve" stem cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • cytokines
  • Several factors are important to regulate stem-cell characteristics within the niche: cell-cell interactions between stem cells, as well as interactions between stem cells and neighbouring differentiated cells, interactions between stem cells and adhesion molecules, extracellular matrix components, the oxygen tension, growth factors, cytokines, and the physicochemical nature of the environment including the pH, ionic strength (e.g. (wikipedia.org)
  • apheresis
  • 1.5 x 10 6 CD34+ cells are collected, patients undergo a second day of apheresis. (confex.com)
  • A total of 15.3, 5.6, and 9.0 x 10 6 CD34+ cells/kg were collected in a single day of apheresis, and no subsequent apheresis or mobilization was required. (confex.com)
  • The mobilization and apheresis procedures had an acceptable toxicity profile. (confex.com)
  • On day 5, daily apheresis started and was continued for up to 4 days, or until ≥ 5 × 10 6 CD34+ cells/kg was collected. (springer.com)
  • In the GP arm, 9/16 patients (56.3%) achieved collection of ≥ 5 × 10 6 CD34+ cells/kg in ≤ 4 days of apheresis, while 1/16 patient (6.3%) achieved this target in the G arm. (springer.com)
  • Intravenous dosing of AMD3100 may result in a faster rise in peripheral CD34+ cell count, so that the drug can be administered the same day as apheresis. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Intravenous dosing may also increase the peak CD34+ cell count, improving the number of CD34+ cells collected via apheresis. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • The cells will be recollected from peripheral blood by apheresis and refrigerated. (bioportfolio.com)
  • receptor
  • 6 , 7 These mice were generated fortuitously when mice transgenic for a T-cell receptor recognizing an epitope of bovine RNase (C57BL/6.KRN, herein KRN) were bred onto an NOD background. (bloodjournal.org)
  • Melanoblasts express the KIT receptor, and it is believed that SCF guides these cells to their terminal locations. (wikipedia.org)
  • CD117 is a cytokine receptor expressed on the surface of hematopoietic stem cells as well as other cell types. (wikipedia.org)
  • When this receptor binds to stem cell factor (SCF) it forms a dimer that activates its intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity, that in turn phosphorylates and activates signal transduction molecules that propagate the signal in the cell. (wikipedia.org)
  • Their atomic investigation of mutant KIT receptor which emphasized on the EAL region provided a better insight into the understanding of the sunitinib resistance mechanism of the KIT receptor and could help to discover new therapeutics for KIT-based resistant tumor cells in GIST therapy. (wikipedia.org)
  • This receptor has a wide cellular distribution, with expression on most immature and mature hematopoietic cell types (e.g. neutrophils, monocytes, T and B cells, dendritic cells, Langerhans cells and macrophages). (wikipedia.org)
  • The chemokine receptor CXCR5 is expressed on B cells and CD4+ Tfh cells and is involved in lymphocyte homing and the development of normal lymphoid tissue. (wikipedia.org)
  • This receptor has also been identified on memory B cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • CXCL2 mobilizes cells by interacting with a cell surface chemokine receptor called CXCR2. (wikipedia.org)
  • Colony-stimulating factors (CSFs) are secreted glycoproteins that bind to receptor proteins on the surfaces of hemopoietic stem cells, thereby activating intracellular signaling pathways that can cause the cells to proliferate and differentiate into a specific kind of blood cell (usually white blood cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • HSPCs
  • Interactions between HSPCs and their niches are altered during mobilization and must be reestablished during BM homing and repopulation. (hindawi.com)
  • tissues
  • Under steady-state conditions, a small amount of hematopoietic stem cells constantly leave the BM and penetrate tissues, returning to the BM or peripheral niches via the blood or lymphatic system [ 2 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • B cell-attracting chemokine 1, a human CXC chemokine expressed in lymphoid tissues, selectively attracts B lymphocytes via BLR1/CXCR5. (wikipedia.org)
  • The stem cell theory of aging postulates that the aging process is the result of the inability of various types of stem cells to continue to replenish the tissues of an organism with functional differentiated cells capable of maintaining that tissue's (or organ's) original function. (wikipedia.org)
  • There are also several challenges when it comes to therapeutic use of stem cells and their ability to replenish organs and tissues. (wikipedia.org)
  • Isolation of cells from some tissues may be improved by oxygenating the solution. (wikipedia.org)
  • More recently, mesoangioblasts have been theorized as a cell giving rise to multiple mesodermal tissues. (wikipedia.org)
  • regimen
  • The patients will receive a nonmyeloablative conditioning regimen with cyclophosphamide and fludarabine, and after this, the cells will be injected intravenously. (bioportfolio.com)
  • stimulation
  • The same paper suggested that FLT3L release was caused by stimulation of mast cells with uric acid, produced from a precursor secreted by the plasmodium parasite. (wikipedia.org)
  • niches
  • citation needed] A Nature Insight review defines niche as follows: "Stem-cell populations are established in 'niches' - specific anatomic locations that regulate how they participate in tissue generation, maintenance and repair. (wikipedia.org)
  • adult
  • One example is the transformation of iris cells to lens cells in the process of maturation and transformation of retinal pigment epithelium cells into the neural retina during regeneration in adult newt eyes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some types of mature, specialized adult cells can naturally revert to stem cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • For instance, multilineage-differentiating stress-enduring (Muse) cells are stress-tolerant adult human stem cells that can self-renew. (wikipedia.org)
  • By method of isolation and cell function, three main populations of putative adult EPCs have been described. (wikipedia.org)
  • Adult stem cells remain in an undifferentiated state throughout adult life. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is believed that correct culturing conditions of adult stem cells needs to be improved so that adult stem cells can maintain their stemness over time. (wikipedia.org)
  • mast
  • Mice with SCF or c-Kit mutations have severe defects in the production of mast cells, having less than 1% of the normal levels of mast cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Conversely, the injection of SCF increases mast cell numbers near the site of injection by over 100 times. (wikipedia.org)
  • In addition, mast cells, melanocytes in the skin, and interstitial cells of Cajal in the digestive tract express CD117. (wikipedia.org)
  • In strains of plasmodium, FLT3L was shown to be released from mast cells and cause the expansion of dendritic cells, leading to the activation of CD8+ T cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • diseases
  • Diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, end-stage renal failure and heart disease are caused by different mechanisms that are not related to stem cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • tumor cells
  • Another explanation of this observation is provided by a study that shows the ability of CXCL12 (and CCL2) producing tumors to entrain neutrophils that inhibit seeding of tumor cells in the lung. (wikipedia.org)
  • involves
  • This damage response involves the proteolysis of type XVII collagen by neutrophil elastase in response to the DNA damage in the hair follicle stem cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • A simple technique for dissociating cells involves cutting the tissue into small chunk before agitating the chunks in a solution using a pipette. (wikipedia.org)
  • The process involves sucking out the nucleus of a somatic (body) cell and injecting it into an oocyte that has had its nucleus removed Using an approach based on the protocol outlined by Tachibana et al. (wikipedia.org)
  • decrease
  • Furthermore, the osteoclast inhibiting hormone calcitonin was reported to decrease HSPC mobilization in response to LPS injection [ 11 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • induces
  • Discovery of thalicthuberine as a novel antimitotic agent from nature that disrupts microtubule dynamics and induces apoptosis in prostate cancer cells. (abcam.com)
  • niche
  • During this time, the field exploded with studies aimed at determining the components of the "hematopoietic stem cell niche" that made this possible. (wikipedia.org)
  • The stem cells and niche may induce each other during development and reciprocally signal to maintain each other during adulthood. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] A Nature Insight review defines niche as follows: "Stem-cell populations are established in 'niches' - specific anatomic locations that regulate how they participate in tissue generation, maintenance and repair. (wikipedia.org)
  • Yet the niche may also induce pathologies by imposing aberrant function on stem cells or other targets. (wikipedia.org)
  • The simple location of stem cells is not sufficient to define a niche. (wikipedia.org)
  • Though the concept of stem cell niche was prevailing in vertebrates, the first characterization of stem cell niche in vivo was worked out in Drosophila germinal development. (wikipedia.org)
  • By continuous intravital imaging in mice, researchers were able to explore the structure of the stem cell niche and to obtain the fate of individual stem cells (SCs) and their progeny over time in vivo. (wikipedia.org)
  • In particular in intestinal crypt, two distinct groups of SCs have been identified: the "border stem cells" located in the upper part of the niche at the interface with transit amplifying cells (TAs), and "central stem cells" located at the crypt base. (wikipedia.org)
  • This bi-compartmental structure of stem cell niche has been mathematically modeled to obtain the optimal architecture that leads to the maximum delay in double-hit mutant production. (wikipedia.org)
  • CD34
  • EPCs were isolated by cell sorting of the Flk1 and CD34 double-positive population 11-13 and cultured in endothelial cell basal medium-2 (Clonetics) with supplementation as previously described. (ahajournals.org)
  • Investigators found that live kinase B1 (LKB1) was upregulated in CD34 + CD38 − acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells. (hematopoiesisnews.com)
  • signals
  • However, the signals that mediate trafficking and recruitment of these cells are not well understood. (ahajournals.org)
  • It constitutes a basic unit of tissue physiology, integrating signals that mediate the balanced response of stem cells to the needs of organisms. (wikipedia.org)
  • vitro
  • Bradley TR, Metcalf D. The growth of mouse bone marrow cells in vitro. (springer.com)
  • They showed that opposing gradients of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and Nodal, two transforming growth factor family members that act as morphogens, are sufficient to induce molecular and cellular mechanisms required to organize, in vivo or in vitro, uncommitted cells of the zebrafish blastula animal pole into a well-developed embryo. (wikipedia.org)
  • They form characteristic cell clusters in suspension culture that express a set of genes associated with pluripotency and can differentiate into endodermal, ectodermal and mesodermal cells both in vitro and in vivo. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hematopoietic progenitor cells have also been shown to migrate towards a higher concentration gradient of SCF in vitro, which suggests that SCF is involved in chemotaxis for these cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Blood
  • This phase II trial studies how well tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil works in preventing graft-versus-host disease in patients who have undergone total-body irradiation (TBI) with or without fludarabine phosphate followed by donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant for hematologic cancer. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • 4,5 Moreover, pilot trials using progenitor cells acquired from bone marrow or peripheral blood have shown benefit in improving blood supply of the ischemic tissue. (ahajournals.org)
  • G-CSF stimulates the production of granulocytes, a type of white blood cell. (wikipedia.org)
  • While some types of cell naturally exist in a separated form, for example blood cells, other cell types that are found in solid tissue requiring specific techniques to separate into individual cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Circulating cells such as blood cells or some tumour cells can be isolated by taking a blood sample. (wikipedia.org)
  • As blood samples contain a mixture of many different cell types, a method of separating out cells into different types must be used. (wikipedia.org)
  • For red blood cell formation, see erythropoietin). (wikipedia.org)
  • Hematopoietic progenitor cells are normally present in the blood at low levels. (wikipedia.org)
  • Evans syndrome is an autoimmune disease in which an individual's antibodies attack their own red blood cells and platelets. (wikipedia.org)
  • Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a condition in which the red blood cells that normally carry oxygen and carbon dioxide are destroyed by an autoimmune process. (wikipedia.org)
  • As these cells are short-lived, there needs to be a steady turnover of new blood cells and the maintenance of an HSC pool. (wikipedia.org)
  • The pioneering work of Till and McCulloch in 1961 experimentally confirmed the development of blood cells from a single precursor hematopoietic stem cell (HSC), creating the framework for the field of hematopoiesis to be studied over the following decades. (wikipedia.org)
  • As the embryo requires rapid oxygenation due to its high mitotic activity, these islands are the main source of red blood cell (RBC) production via fusing endothelial cells (ECs) with the developing embryonic circulation. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, Ueno and Weissman provided the earliest contradiction to the hemangioblast theory when they saw that distinct ES cells mixed into a blastocyst resulted in more than 1 ES cell contributing to the majority of the blood islands found in the resultant embryo. (wikipedia.org)
  • This cytokine plays an important role in hematopoiesis (formation of blood cells), spermatogenesis, and melanogenesis. (wikipedia.org)
  • quiescent
  • Moreover, they can make this transition even in the absence of noticeable injuries and are capable of replenishing entire gastric units, in essence serving as quiescent "reserve" stem cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • hematopoiesis
  • During the last ten years, mounting evidence implicates the family of lysine-specific histone demethylases as critical regulators of normal hematopoiesis, whereas their deregulation is found in a broad spectrum of hematopoietic malignancies. (hematopoiesisnews.com)