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  • flaps
  • These valves have tissue flaps that open and close with each heartbeat. (nih.gov)
  • Prolapse" is when the flaps of the valve flop or bulge back into an upper heart chamber during a heartbeat. (nih.gov)
  • Stenosis occurs if the flaps of a valve thicken, stiffen, or fuse together. (nih.gov)
  • These valves may not have enough tissue flaps, they may be the wrong size or shape, or they may lack an opening through which blood can flow properly. (nih.gov)
  • leak
  • Birth defects, age-related changes, infections, or other conditions can cause one or more of your heart valves to not open fully or to let blood leak back into the heart chambers. (nih.gov)
  • atria
  • As the blood builds up in the atria, these valves open to allow blood to flow into the ventricles (the heart's two lower chambers). (nih.gov)
  • flows
  • The blue arrow shows the direction in which oxygen-poor blood flows through the heart to the lungs. (nih.gov)
  • The red arrow shows the direction in which oxygen-rich blood flows from the lungs into the heart and then out to the body. (nih.gov)
  • As a result, not enough blood flows through the valve. (nih.gov)