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  • diastolic blood pr
  • Taken together, a low salt diet (median of approximately 4.4 g/day - approx 1800 mg Sodium) in hypertensive people resulted in a decrease in systolic blood pressure by 4.2 mmHg, and in diastolic blood pressure by 2.1 mmHg. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pulmonary
  • Each of our physicians in the UPMC Comprehensive Pulmonary Hypertension Program have deep expertise in their specialty, but they also work closely with other cardiologists, cardiac surgeons and experts within the UPMC Heart and Vascular Institute . (upmc.com)
  • Influence of bronchial blood flow and conductance on pulmonary function in stable systolic heart failure. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Diastole is the cardiac cycle phase during which the heart is relaxing and filling with incoming blood that is being returned from the body through the inferior (IVC) and superior (SVC) venae cavae to the right atrium and from lungs through pulmonary veins to the left atrium. (wikipedia.org)
  • echocardiographic
  • Objective To test the hypothesis that gouty arthritis (gout) is a risk factor for incidence of heart failure and for echocardiographic measures signifying subclinical heart failure. (bmj.com)
  • Effects of istaroxime on diastolic stiffness in acute heart failure syndromes: Results from the Hemodynamic, Echocardiographic, and Neurohormonal Effects of Istaroxime, a Novel Intravenous Inotropic and Lusitropic Agent: a Randomized Controlled Trial in Patients Hospitalized with Heart Failure (HORIZON-HF) trial. (wikipedia.org)
  • sodium
  • Adrenal infiltration may be harder to appreciate given that its symptoms of orthostatic hypotension and low blood sodium concentration may be attributed to autonomic neuropathy and heart failure. (wikipedia.org)
  • Health Canada Sodium Working Group Heart Failure Society of America, How to follow a low sodium diet Implementing recommendations for dietary salt reduction: Where are we? (wikipedia.org)
  • Weight gain of more than 2 pounds is associated with admission to the hospital for heart failure Sodium restriction - excessive sodium intake may precipitate or exacerbate heart failure, thus a "no added salt" diet (60-100 mmol total daily intake) is recommended for patients with CHF. (wikipedia.org)
  • Heart failure also limits the kidneys' ability to dispose of sodium and water, which further increases edema. (wikipedia.org)
  • myocardial
  • Heart failure is not the same as myocardial infarction (in which part of the heart muscle dies) or cardiac arrest (in which blood flow stops altogether). (wikipedia.org)
  • This causes a decrease in heart rate while myocardial oxygen consumption is unaffected. (wikipedia.org)
  • As such, it can be caused by a wide number of conditions, including myocardial infarction (in which the heart muscle is starved of oxygen and dies), hypertension (which increases the force of contraction needed to pump blood) and amyloidosis (in which misfolded proteins are deposited in the heart muscle, causing it to stiffen). (wikipedia.org)
  • blood pressure
  • this lowers your blood pressure and reduces the stress on your heart. (simstat.com)
  • High blood pressure makes heart work hard to pump out blood. (onlymyhealth.com)
  • A beta-blocker decelerates the heart rate and lowers your blood pressure, to put brakes on the progression of heart failure. (onlymyhealth.com)
  • Enalapril, sold under the brand name Vasotec among others, is a medication used to treat high blood pressure, diabetic kidney disease, and heart failure. (wikipedia.org)
  • This has a reason: the finger closest to the heart is used to occlude the pulse pressure, the middle finger is used get a crude estimate of the blood pressure, and the finger most distal to the heart (usually the ring finger) is used to nullify the effect of the ulnar pulse as the two arteries are connected via the palmar arches (superficial and deep). (wikipedia.org)
  • The pulse is an expedient tactile method of determination of systolic blood pressure to a trained observer. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is a rough measure of systolic blood pressure. (wikipedia.org)
  • Initially, this helps compensate for heart failure by maintaining blood pressure and perfusion, but places further strain on the myocardium, increasing coronary perfusion requirements, which can lead to worsening of ischemic heart disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • This helps restore blood pressure but also increases the total peripheral resistance, increasing the workload of the heart. (wikipedia.org)
  • usually
  • The most common form of amyloidoses, AA amyloidosis, usually spares the heart. (wikipedia.org)
  • AA amyloidosis usually spares the heart. (wikipedia.org)
  • Several classes are used, with combinations reserved for severe heart failure: Loop diuretics (e.g. furosemide, bumetanide) - most commonly used class in CHF, usually for moderate CHF Thiazide diuretics (e.g. hydrochlorothiazide, chlorthalidone, chlorthiazide) - may be useful for mild CHF, but typically used in severe CHF in combination with loop diuretics, resulting in a synergistic effect. (wikipedia.org)
  • contractility
  • This is caused by the terminally differentiated heart muscle fibers increasing in size in an attempt to improve contractility. (wikipedia.org)
  • myosin
  • The availability of cTnI148-159 depends on the blocked-closed-open equilibrium of tropomyosin on actin, which can be impacted by any interactions involving the thin filament, including actin-myosin cross-bridging and length dependent activation (also known as stretch activation or the Frank Starling law of the heart). (wikipedia.org)
  • This is due to reduced ability to cross-link actin and myosin filaments in over-stretched heart muscle. (wikipedia.org)
  • amyloidosis
  • Cardiac amyloidosis is any of several forms of amyloidosis (the accumulation of inappropriately folded proteins) in or affecting the heart. (wikipedia.org)
  • The most common form of amyloidoses, AA amyloidosis, usually spares the heart. (wikipedia.org)
  • Types of cardiac amyloidosis include cardiac manifestations of AL amyloidosis and amyloidosis, cardiac manifestations of transthyretin-related hereditary amyloidosis, and isolated atrial amyloidosis, a form of amyloidosis affecting the atria of the heart. (wikipedia.org)
  • AA amyloidosis usually spares the heart. (wikipedia.org)
  • decrease
  • This causes a decrease in heart rate while myocardial oxygen consumption is unaffected. (wikipedia.org)
  • ACEIs and ARBs decrease afterload by antagonizing the vasopressor effect of angiotensin, thereby decreasing the amount of work the heart must perform. (wikipedia.org)
  • atrial fibrillation
  • An irregular pulse may be due to sinus arrhythmia, ectopic beats, atrial fibrillation, paroxysmal atrial tachycardia, atrial flutter, partial heart block etc. (wikipedia.org)
  • kidneys
  • It has been proven to protect the function of the kidneys in hypertension, heart failure, and diabetes, and may be used in the absence of hypertension for its kidney protective effects. (wikipedia.org)
  • commonly
  • In people with chronic stable mild heart failure, treatment commonly consists of lifestyle modifications such as stopping smoking, physical exercise, and dietary changes, as well as medications. (wikipedia.org)
  • This contributes to the exercise intolerance commonly seen in heart failure. (wikipedia.org)
  • normal
  • Normal pulse rates at rest, in beats per minute (BPM): The pulse rate can be used to check overall heart health and fitness level. (wikipedia.org)
  • As the heart works harder to meet normal metabolic demands, the amount cardiac output can increase in times of increased oxygen demand (e.g., exercise) is reduced. (wikipedia.org)
  • Since the heart has to work harder to meet the normal metabolic demands, it is incapable of meeting the metabolic demands of the body during exercise. (wikipedia.org)
  • calcium
  • Istaroxime, a Stimulator of Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Calcium Adenosine Triphosphatase Isoform 2a Activity, as a Novel Therapeutic Approach to Heart Failure. (wikipedia.org)
  • pressure
  • Dilated ("remodeled") hearts have increased volume relative to the amount of diastolic pressure, and therefore have increased (not decreased) distensibility. (wikipedia.org)
  • rate
  • Pulse (or the count of arterial pulse per minute) is equivalent to measuring the heart rate. (wikipedia.org)
  • The heart rate can also be measured by listening to the heart beat by auscultation, traditionally using a stethoscope and counting it for a minute. (wikipedia.org)
  • The heart rate may be greater or lesser than the pulse rate depending upon physiologic demand. (wikipedia.org)
  • In this case, the heart rate is determined by auscultation or audible sounds at the heart apex, in which case it is not the pulse. (wikipedia.org)