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  • Obama
  • You would think that's a concept fiscal conservatives would applaud, but they're more intent on blocking any expansion of the federal role in health care - and on thwarting President Barack Obama. (juneauempire.com)
  • Judicial Watch has also obtained internal Justice Department documents that suggest Supreme Court Justice Elena Kagan helped coordinate the Obama Administration's legal defense of the healthcare law while she served as Solicitor General. (judicialwatch.org)
  • I'm writing in response to John Lengemann's recent editorial in the Oct. 27 issue under 'Letters to the Editor' and his opinion regarding health care and the potential for rationing under the Obama health care plan. (tricitytimes-online.com)
  • insurers
  • What the scaremongers don't like to talk about is how much our private insurers ration now -- mostly for the sake of their own profits. (chicagotribune.com)
  • Even with the ACA, insurers have many ways to limit choice and access to care, including high-deductible plans (annual deductibles of5,000 for an individual and10,000 for families are part of bronze policies), narrow networks without coverage of out-of-network costs, high co-insurance for specialty drugs, restrictive definitions of medical necessity, and denial of services. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • We resist rationing because someone else (insurers, the government) usually pays for it, and we want everything to be available for ourselves and our families. (chron.com)
  • elderly
  • The Democratic National Committee responded to Palin's most recent treatise with a point-by-point rebuttal of what they called her "absurd" claims that the government wants to create "death panels" and ration care for the elderly. (cnn.com)
  • Oftentimes health bloggers rage about the 'fruitless end-of-life' attempts where people in terminal disease or the extreme elderly have full code status. (blogspot.com)
  • When Globerman surveyed people at the forum--about 85 attended including hospital reps, health care professionals, elderly people, and family members of elderly patients--100 percent responded affirmatively to the question: "Do you believe that some health care providers would have treated you (or a senior you know) better if you or they had been younger? (blindcanadians.ca)
  • Other speakers talked of substandard care in nursing homes, with elderly relatives left to lie in their own waste or vomit and going for days or even weeks without baths or showers. (blindcanadians.ca)
  • In some, if not many cases, the care and treatment of elderly people in hospitals and nursing homes "is not meeting acceptable standards," he says. (blindcanadians.ca)
  • Globerman's goal for Running To Daylight is not only to continue questioning standards for the care and treatment of elderly people, but also to provide independent patient advocates for them. (blindcanadians.ca)
  • To me, the health of our elderly is much more important that spending billions on war. (cityprofile.com)
  • ethics
  • Justice in healthcare is a substantial part of ethics in medicine, here we will cover some of the distinctive aspects of justice-based concerns and some basic ethics language to help wade through these interesting ethical issues. (uw.edu)
  • patients
  • Simply put if you add 50 million more patients on the same number of doctors that we currently have it is NOT possible to avoid longer waits and some form of rationing. (cnn.com)
  • By changing that, we'll save billions of dollars while improving the quality of care for patients. (freerepublic.com)
  • These things aren't "rationing" in the old-fashioned sense, but as far as patients are concerned (to quote Kyl), "it's the same result. (juneauempire.com)
  • It's not exactly rationing - but as far as patients are concerned, "it's the same result. (juneauempire.com)
  • He found that uninsured patients stayed in hospitals for less time, received 20 percent less care and died at a rate 37 percent higher than the insured. (juneauempire.com)
  • In ten groups of about six people, members of the public are asked to discuss a hypothetical rationing choice, concerning four identified patients who are described in general terms but without detailed information. (lse.ac.uk)
  • Drug companies are charging high prices without any restrictions by government, while states with their limited budgets are looking at treating just some of the sicker patients, leaving the rest of the population with hepatitis C untreated and a public health threat. (huffpost.com)
  • He knew that failing to take the medication could cause graft rejection, so he made an appointment with Dr. Roberts, a nephrologist at a local academic center who specialized in care of renal transplant patients. (uw.edu)
  • Further, Dr. Roberts was wary because purchasing organs was illegal in the U.S. Having worked in the transplant field for several decades and witnessed numerous changes in the regulations about and care of transplant patients, Dr. Roberts understood how difficult it was to secure an organ, but didn't want to be perceived as condoning Mr. Lawrence's actions. (uw.edu)
  • National Right to Life Executive Director, David N. O'Steen, Ph.D, says, "This is the cruelest and most effective way to ensure that doctors are forced to ration care for their senior citizen patients. (blogspot.com)
  • We urge you to ensure that this year's budget provides the NHS with the funding it needs to deliver the standards of care patients expect. (wmuk.org.uk)
  • In fact, studies show that patients want 40 percent less care than is sometimes recommended by a physician. (chron.com)
  • It is time to begin open discussions about how to deal with expensive, minimally effective, medical care with patients, families, professionals and ethicists and not the medical industrialists who gain from prolonging life at every expense. (chron.com)
  • physicians
  • His physicians advise him that he could be on the list for up to 3 years and that his health during that time would not be jeopardized, aside from the risks and inconveniences associated with long-term dialysis. (uw.edu)
  • Primary care physicians are the ones who traditionally focus on personal care. (normanmakous.com)
  • deny
  • And, although Sarah's insurer may deny it, we also ration it to those who are lucky enough to have access to the big soapbox that she happens to have. (chicagotribune.com)
  • Their bills set up a council on "comparative effectiveness research" to study which forms of care are cost-effective and which are wasteful, but they insist the board won't have power to deny payment for inefficient practices - at least, not now. (juneauempire.com)
  • What we have to identify are marginally beneficial, non-cost-worthy health care options that we would be willing to deny to our future selves to guarantee we have sufficient resources to provide health care to everyone," he said. (medicalxpress.com)
  • Instead of continuing to deny that we have had and still have rationing, and that it must continue, the necessity for rationing should be admitted. (normanmakous.com)
  • debate
  • Rationing" is one of the scariest words in the health-care debate. (chicagotribune.com)
  • Newsweek Managing Editor Daniel Klaidman explains that his magazine decided to ask Sen. Ted Kennedy to author a cover piece on health care, because 'his absence during this historic debate had been so palpable, yet here was a way for this respected voice on health care to weigh in and be part of the national conversation at a critical moment. (freerepublic.com)
  • Discussions are chaired by an academic specialising in health policy, whose role is to encourage debate but not actively to participate. (lse.ac.uk)
  • Rationing, the hated R-word, evokes widespread resentment and debate whenever mentioned in connection with health care in the U. S. There are many who hold that we don't ration care now, never want to, and that the free market will work its magic and be fair to all without rationing if we just keep the government out of health care. (huffpost.com)
  • private
  • Many others see that private markets already ration care based on ability to pay, and support the role of government providing for the common good, in this case by assuring access to care based on medical need. (huffpost.com)
  • The reaction so far in both the private and public sectors is to continue business as usual without recognizing trade-offs that would be necessary to avoid another huge escalation of health care costs. (huffpost.com)
  • Emanuel
  • This is, Emanuel noted, a form of de facto rationing that stems from legislated attempts to constrain market forces that might otherwise have worked to make generic drugs more profitable. (nationalanalysts.com)
  • medical care
  • Therefore, the cost of medical care will be greatly reduced since the amount of medical care will be greatly reduced. (csmonitor.com)
  • That doctor is the first to assess their problems and manage their medical care. (normanmakous.com)
  • Today, many regard medical care as the applied science of statistically derived, evidence-based medicine based upon practices shown to be effective for the majority of a group. (normanmakous.com)
  • Medical care should be more than individual care. (normanmakous.com)
  • I want to emphasize that personal medical care should not be confused with personal-ized medical care, a term hijacked by geneticists and deceptively used starting 10 years ago. (normanmakous.com)
  • But when it comes to expensive, marginally effective medical care, we feel differently. (chron.com)
  • services
  • It is useful and necessary to "ration" services that are not efficacious or cost effective based on scientific evidence, as is done successfully by such countries as the United Kingdom, with their National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE). (huffingtonpost.com)
  • The second definition of rationing is the type that one might be familiar with from World War II, where the government passed laws prohibiting people from purchasing more than a certain minimum amount of goods and services deemed essential to the war - such as gasoline and sugar. (blogspot.com)
  • However, proof that the government is going to engage in this second type of rationing requires evidence that the government is going to prohibit people from buying particular goods and services. (blogspot.com)
  • Social Policy and the Rationing of Medical Services. (annals.org)
  • Resources (or goods and services) are rationed to those willing and able to meet the established market price. (annals.org)
  • Some fear that this initiative will lead to rationing certain medical services. (chron.com)
  • Drugs
  • The result: more than 8,300 people - a record number - are on waiting lists in 13 states to get antiretrovirals and other drugs used to treat HIV and AIDS or the side effects, mental health conditions or opportunistic infections. (medicynic.com)
  • HIV drugs are of course the tip of this health care rationing iceberg. (medicynic.com)
  • refuse
  • This is the 'just caring' problem: Why should anyone else pay attention to my demands for justice in meeting my health needs when I refuse to pay attention to their demands for justice in meeting their health needs? (medicalxpress.com)
  • ethical
  • This small-scale study develops a new methodology for investigating which ethical principles of health care rationing the public support after discussion and deliberation. (lse.ac.uk)
  • On the basis of an innovative qualitative data analysis, which translates what people say into ethical principles identified in the theoretical literature, the public appear to support three main rationing principles: (1) a broad 'rule of rescue' that gives priority to those in immediate need, (2) health maximisation and (3) equalisation of lifetime health. (lse.ac.uk)
  • choice
  • Then it will kill ANY freedom of choice individuals once exercised for their health care, then it will kill the flow of the current resources to those who are unfairly obtaining it so that they can be redistributed in a more just and fair manner. (freerepublic.com)
  • One proposal provides everyone, whether insured or uninsured, an additional choice: the option of a public health plan that people can count on to cover what they need at more affordable rates. (legalinsurrection.com)
  • people
  • Let spell this one out for you - this explicitly means that health care resources will be denied in specified areas so that they can then be freely provided to Illegal Aliens and people who vote for 0bama. (freerepublic.com)
  • If it were a child receiving the same care, there's no way that people would accept it. (blindcanadians.ca)
  • Some people like to think of health care and education of basic human rights. (blogspot.com)
  • In a country that already spends more than 16 percent of each GDP dollar on health care ( PDF ), it's easy to see why so many people believe there's simply not enough of it to go around. (unsilentgeneration.net)
  • cost
  • In other words, there is nothing in the bill that outlaws price rationing, where those with an interest in these high-cost, low-benefit procedures can pay for them out of their own pocket, provided they have deep enough pockets. (blogspot.com)
  • She is saying that the cost of her children care and needs are supposed to be laid upon others. (cnn.com)
  • Shouldn't we foster the same kind of comparisons in health care as we do for a brand of shirt in order to know which is the best in terms of cost and quality? (chron.com)
  • Currently, the cost of health care is too high, leading to more uninsured, global noncompetitiveness and budget deficits. (chron.com)
  • policy
  • Health Policy, 49 (1-2). (lse.ac.uk)
  • Garson, former dean of academic operations at Baylor College of Medicine , is director of the Center for Health Policy at the University of Virginia . (chron.com)
  • Engelhard is director of the Health Policy Program, Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Virginia. (chron.com)
  • shortage
  • Since America's real shortage when it comes to delivering health care is a fiscal one, a collective discussion needs to be launched to come up with socially acceptable guidelines, states Fleck's book. (medicalxpress.com)