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  • poisons
  • could involve the spread of radioactive poisons over large areas, killing thousands immediately, killing others through increasing susceptibility to cancer, risking genetic defects that could affect future generations, and, possibly contaminating for future habitation or cultivation, large land areas ( Ontario, 1979b , pp. 9- 10). (ccnr.org)
  • emission
  • The tasks of disaster response technical workers in Fukushima Dai-ichi NPP after the tsunami were to restore the cooling of reactors and the fuel pools, containment and treatment of water contaminated by radioactive materials, and mitigation of radioactive materials emission in the environment eventually achieving the cold shutdown of the NPP. (bmj.com)
  • plutonium
  • Without a monitoring capability, DOE faces increased risks of an accidental plutonium release that could harm workers, the public, and the environment. (gao.gov)
  • Tom Carpenter, executive director of another watchdog group, the Hanford Challenge in central Washington state, said that the Energy Department as recently as last year released an unknown quantity of radioactive particles during demolition of a shuttered weapons factory, the Plutonium Finishing Plant. (latimes.com)
  • involve
  • Working conditions at the GDPs involve both radiological and non-radiological occupational hazards. (osha.gov)
  • Frequently, conditions involve a combination of these hazards. (osha.gov)
  • Detection
  • A dirty bomb uses conventional explosives to disperse radioactive material across a wide area, although slower and less dramatic methods are possible and may escape detection. (safecastle.com)
  • material
  • The area affected by a radiological attack could be fairly small-a few blocks-or could cover hundreds of square kilometers with low-level radiation, depending primarily on the type and amount of radioactive material used. (safecastle.com)
  • Inhaled radioactive material can be deposited in the lungs and will continue to expose the individual to radiation for as long as the material remains in the lungs, which can be many years. (safecastle.com)
  • The truck was carrying a radioactive material called packaged fissile, Highway Patrol spokesman Lt. Everett Clendenin said. (wise-uranium.org)
  • emergency
  • The CDW, which usually warns of a specific hazard and gives specific protective action, has a higher priority than the Local Area Emergency (LAE). (weather.gov)
  • The CEM is a higher priority message than the Local Area Emergency (LAE), but the hazard is less specific then the Civil Danger Warning (CDW). (weather.gov)
  • shut
  • After a series of three releases during 2017, the Energy Department shut down the demolition and has yet to resume it. (latimes.com)
  • control
  • The findings provide troubling new evidence that the federal government is losing control of at least some of the radioactive byproducts of the country's weapons program. (latimes.com)
  • However
  • By the same token, however, little of that gas will be released if one simply drills a well into the shale. (i-sis.org.uk)
  • However, there were four major hazards identified: radiation, heat, stress and machine operation and manual handling. (bmj.com)